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Im new to programming and was wanting to ask, is the code shown below a good way to use the try catch within a boolean method?

Its just example code but I have many methods within my Presenter classes and was wondering the way I placed the catch just returning false, is this ok to do, or how else could I improve this

public bool TestMethod()
{
    try
    {
       if(true)
       { 
         //some random code
         return true;
       }
       else{return false;}
    }
    catch{return false;}
}

I just wanted to be sure it a good way to implement this, I would appreciate any feedback on how this could improved.

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1  
What code is inside the try block? Depending on what that code is, the best thing to do may be to remove the try/catch block entirely, and simply let it fail. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Feb 28 '11 at 11:43

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here are some points, which I find a bit discerning about the code in the question:

There are multiple return statements in the code at various places, this may be confusing to the reader of the code. We generally tend to follow a single return statement in a function. (All though there are some exceptions to rule, like an early return in case of some error condition)

Generally you should never hide an exception from the user (or some say "never swallow an exception"), you should either rethrow it or handle the exception and display it to the user.

In the least, there should be some log of the exception.

So with these points in mind, the above code can be written as:

public bool TestMethod()
{
    bool returnValue = false;
    try
    {
       if(true)
       { 
         //some random code
         returnValue = true;
       }       
    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    {
         // log the exception here, or rethrow it
    }

    return returnValue;
}
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1  
I agree, except with the fact that you're catching the base Exception class. You should only catch a more specific, derived exception that you are sure you can handle. There's no point in catching an exception just to rethrow it. –  Cody Gray Feb 28 '11 at 11:33
    
Agreed Cody. The code within is "random code"...so base Exception class :) –  Ngm Feb 28 '11 at 11:39
    
I thank you for that it makes alot of sense :) –  WisperWordsOfwisdom_code_in_c_ Feb 28 '11 at 11:41
    
Also to everyone here thank you I now have a much better understanding through all of your concepts, thank you! :D –  WisperWordsOfwisdom_code_in_c_ Feb 28 '11 at 11:42
2  
@Dave: There's absolutely no reason to throw an exception in the //some random code section, just to catch it below. That's an anti-pattern, it's called using exceptions to control the flow of your program. There are better ways to deal with that situation. Exceptions should be reserved for truly exceptional conditions, not just those you want to return false for. –  Cody Gray Feb 28 '11 at 11:45

Don't use a catch-all in such a way. Catching all exceptions is acceptable for the top level exception handler. But it shouldn't just swallow them. But log them and perhaps display an error.

For your code you should only catch the specific exception types you're expecting. And I'm not sure if in your example exceptions are a good idea at all.

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+1 for 'swallowing exceptions' - this is very bad practice. –  Dave Feb 28 '11 at 11:40

IMHO its not the purpose of the catch-block to return values. I'll use it this way:


public bool TestMethod()
{
    bool retVal = false;
    try
    {
        if (true)
        {
            //some random code
            retVal = true;
        }
        else{}
    }
    catch{}
    return retVal;
}

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Yeah, that's what I'd do. But that empty catch block still bothers me. A lot. That's a code smell that I can smell from here. –  Cody Gray Feb 28 '11 at 11:31
    
interesting I like that :D –  WisperWordsOfwisdom_code_in_c_ Feb 28 '11 at 11:33
    
one last thing please! I noticed in your catch{} its blank, is that ok to do? alot of my bool methods I have no exceptions to be caught, so is it ok to just leave like that? –  WisperWordsOfwisdom_code_in_c_ Feb 28 '11 at 11:36
    
@WisperWordsOfwisdom_code_in_c_: No, it is not OK. It would swallow all exceptions silently. –  Timwi Feb 28 '11 at 11:44
    
@Wisper: If you have no exceptions to be caught, you don't need a try-catch block in the first place. You shouldn't wrap all of your code with exception handling unless you have a very specific reason to do so. –  Cody Gray Feb 28 '11 at 11:47

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/0yd65esw%28v=vs.80%29.aspx

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This isn't a particularly helpful answer. I'm sure the asker could have referenced the documentation on her own. They've already written the code; they're asking for stylistic advice. –  Cody Gray Feb 28 '11 at 11:31

It depends on what you do in your if block. If you return false on an unexpected error, you'll never be able to know what went wrong. If your code is simple enough and you know for what went wrong, it is a good usage.

For example, it is a good approach for a method which checks if the given string is a valid number and multiplier of 5. If it is not a number, you'll get an exception and you don't need to log it or nothing else can cause an exception.

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I understand the concept and thank you for the guidance :) –  WisperWordsOfwisdom_code_in_c_ Feb 28 '11 at 11:33

The point here is readability and everybody has his style (this is not a matter of right and wrong). What I do is declaring a return value (as some guys did here like retVal, returnValue,...), my favorite is result which in your case should be a bool.

Then playing with this result variable in method body i.e inside try/catch and DO NOT return anything unless at the end of method where I return result. Personally use return where the remaining code (after return) should not be run.

This way the reader would not confused of so many returns. You may think about performance benefits of early returns which I doubt (if compiler optimization cannot do it for you) it has a little effect in the world of frameworks and layers, where we are sacrificing performance for design issues in a daily basis.

Finally, take the point CodeInChaos said seriously. If you don't know an exception reason and would not take care of it in a graceful fashion, leave it to be thrown. Exceptions are not bad things, they are like pain in medicine. A chronic diabetic person who has lost the pain in his feet, will not notice small injuries in his feet and a google search will should you the pictures resulting of ignoring painful signals.

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Erm, this was a good answer up until the very last. I think your analogy is a bit of a stretch. And it's carried a little too far with the graphic description/link. –  Cody Gray Feb 28 '11 at 12:47

It is certainly OK to return directly from inside a catch clause, if that’s what you’re asking. Otherwise the compiler would prohibit it; for example, you can’t return from inside a finally clause.

In your particular code example, however, the catch clause seems pointless, because the code inside the try is not going to throw any exceptions (except for system-level exceptions like OutOfMemoryException, but that’s... exceptional, anyway). It would make more sense if there were a throw statement inside it, or a call to a method that you think might throw (for example, File.Open could throw a FileNotFoundException).

Regarding code style, I would recommend that you use indentation a bit more:

public bool TestMethod()
{
    try
    {
        if (some_condition)
        { 
            //some random code
            return true;
        }
        else
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
    catch
    {
        return false;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much for the help, so may I ask, do you mean if I were using such file operations in my try{} then, I should implement the throw new exception within my catch? before I would return false? –  WisperWordsOfwisdom_code_in_c_ Feb 28 '11 at 11:29
    
I just wondering would throw new exceptions be placed in my try's else statement or within the catch statement :) –  WisperWordsOfwisdom_code_in_c_ Feb 28 '11 at 11:31
    
@WisperWordsOfwisdom_code_in_c_: I think there is a confusion somewhere. If you use the throw statement, then you are throwing an exception of your own. If you call File.Open, that might throw an exception of its own. Doing both makes no sense. — You can certainly use throw inside a catch (in which case a new exception will be thrown and the caught exception discarded), but in most cases you should probably not catch the exception in the first place unless you actually need to do something in response to it. –  Timwi Feb 28 '11 at 11:46

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