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I'm using JPA/Hibernate over PGSQL DB.

I have an entity in my application, and I want to persist another entity (of a different type) every time the first entity is persisted. For example, whenever an "ORDER" is created, I want to immediately persist an empty "ORDER_INVOICE" entity and connect it to the order. These reside in two different tables.

At first I thought about writing a @PostPersist function for the ORDER entity and persisting the ORDER_INVOICE in it, but my problem is that I don't have the Entity Manager in this context.

I'm looking to avoid remembering to persist the ORDER_INVOICE upon every ORDER persistence.

Is that the right way to go? If so, how do I get the EM into the PostPersist? And if not, what would be a better way?

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With "created" do you mean "persisted"? –  MRalwasser Feb 28 '11 at 12:03
    
@MRalwasser: Yes. –  Eldad Mor Feb 28 '11 at 12:24
    
There seems to be no standardized way for doing this: From the JPA 1.0 spec: "In general, portable applications should not invoke EntityManager or Query operations, access other entity instances, or modify relationships in a lifecycle callback method.". Maybe you can use a solution like @JB Nizet has stated. –  MRalwasser Feb 28 '11 at 12:53
    
@MRalwasser: thanks, that's very good to know, and JB Nizet's solution was indeed helpful. –  Eldad Mor Feb 28 '11 at 13:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Why don't you simply create it in the constructor of your master entity, and set cascade=persist on the relationship?

@Entity
public class Order {

    @OneToMany(mappedBy = "order", cascade=CascadeType.PERSIST)
    private List<Invoice> invoices = new ArrayList<Invoice>();

    public Order() {
        Invoice i = new Invoice();
        i.setOrder(this);
        this.invoices.add(i);
    }

    // ...
}

EDITED :

To avoid creating a new invoice each time the Order's constructor is invoked (by JPA, for example), you could use this kind of code :

@Entity
public class Order {

    @OneToMany(mappedBy = "order", cascade=CascadeType.PERSIST)
    private List<Invoice> invoices = new ArrayList<Invoice>();

    /**
     * Constructor called by JPA when an entity is loaded from DB
     */
    protected Order() {
    }

    /**
     * Factory method; which creates an order and its default invoice
     */
    public static Order createOrder() {
        Order o = new Order();
        Invoice i = new Invoice();
        i.setOrder(o);
        o.invoices.add(i);
    }

    // ...
}

If the order is persisted after having been instanciated by the factory method, then the invoice will be persisted as well (thanks to the cascade). If the order is not persisted, then it will be garbage collected at some point, and its default invoide as well.

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Because then every construction of the order will automatically create a new invoice, whereas I want it to only be created on persisting the order (which is done only once). Also, the order in my case doesn't know/care about the invoice (though this can be changed). –  Eldad Mor Feb 28 '11 at 12:17
1  
You could make your default constructor protected. It would still be called by your JPA engine when loading entities from the database. And you would add a static factory method which would create the order and its default invoice, as in my answer. –  JB Nizet Feb 28 '11 at 12:24
    
I see what you mean. So let me reiterate - I'll make a method that will: 1) create a new order 2) fill the order with all the needed data 3) persist the order 4) create the invoice 5) connect the invoice to the order 6) persist the invoice. That sounds good to me. Is that what you meant? –  Eldad Mor Feb 28 '11 at 12:32
    
I edited the answer to show you what I mean. The persistence of the order and its invoice doesn't have to be done in the factory method. If you persist the order, its invoice will be persisted as well, thanks to the cascade. –  JB Nizet Feb 28 '11 at 13:03
    
Oh I see. Thanks, that's helpful! –  Eldad Mor Feb 28 '11 at 13:11

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