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I like some features of D, but would be interested if they come with a runtime penalty?

To compare, I implemented a simple program that computes scalar products of many short vectors both in C++ and in D. The result is surprising:

  • D: 18.9 s [see below for final runtime]
  • C++: 3.8 s

Is C++ really almost five times as fast or did I make a mistake in the D program (it is my first one, please forgive me)?


Summary of answers: D is as fast as C++ (for numerical computations) if

  1. one uses the correct optimization options (-O -release -inline -m64)
  2. uses gdc/gdmd instead of dmd
  3. uses correct D calling conventions (in vector_t x instead of const ref vector_t x in the arguments to function scalar_product below; --- while replacing the for loops by foreach looks nicer, but does not affect runtimes).

Here all the figures on my machine:

  • D (const ref arguments, dmd compiler, correct optimization): 9.6s
  • D (in arguments, dmd compiler, correct optimization): 6.1s
  • D (in arguments, gdmd compiler, correct optimization): 3.9s
  • C++: 3.8s

I used gdc/gdmd 4.3. The combination D(const ref arguments, gdmd compiler) did not compile and thus has not been tested. Aside: gdc/gdmd did not have the datetime library yet and compiling it from sources failed for me, so it seems not as easy to handle as dmd right now.

Thanks CyberShadow and GMan and all others!


Continuation of original question:

I compiled C++ with g++ -O3 (gcc-snapshot 2011-02-19) and D with dmd -O (dmd 2.052) on a moderate recent linux desktop. The results are reproducible over several runs and standard deviations negligible.

Here the C++ program:

#include <iostream>
#include <random>
#include <chrono>
#include <string>

#include <vector>
#include <array>

typedef std::chrono::duration<long, std::ratio<1, 1000>> millisecs;
template <typename _T>
long time_since(std::chrono::time_point<_T>& time) {
      long tm = std::chrono::duration_cast<millisecs>( std::chrono::system_clock::now() - time).count();
  time = std::chrono::system_clock::now();
  return tm;
}

const long N = 20000;
const int size = 10;

typedef int value_type;
typedef long long result_type;
typedef std::vector<value_type> vector_t;
typedef typename vector_t::size_type size_type;

inline value_type scalar_product(const vector_t& x, const vector_t& y) {
  value_type res = 0;
  size_type siz = x.size();
  for (size_type i = 0; i < siz; ++i)
    res += x[i] * y[i];
  return res;
}

int main() {
  auto tm_before = std::chrono::system_clock::now();

  // 1. allocate and fill randomly many short vectors
  vector_t* xs = new vector_t [N];
  for (int i = 0; i < N; ++i) {
    xs[i] = vector_t(size);
      }
  std::cerr << "allocation: " << time_since(tm_before) << " ms" << std::endl;

  std::mt19937 rnd_engine;
  std::uniform_int_distribution<value_type> runif_gen(-1000, 1000);
  for (int i = 0; i < N; ++i)
    for (int j = 0; j < size; ++j)
      xs[i][j] = runif_gen(rnd_engine);
  std::cerr << "random generation: " << time_since(tm_before) << " ms" << std::endl;

  // 2. compute all pairwise scalar products:
  time_since(tm_before);
  result_type avg = 0;
  for (int i = 0; i < N; ++i)
    for (int j = 0; j < N; ++j) 
      avg += scalar_product(xs[i], xs[j]);
  avg = avg / N*N;
  auto time = time_since(tm_before);
  std::cout << "result: " << avg << std::endl;
  std::cout << "time: " << time << " ms" << std::endl;
}

And here the D version:

import std.stdio;
import std.datetime;
import std.random;

const long N = 20000;
const int size = 10;

alias int value_type;
alias long result_type;
alias value_type[] vector_t;
alias uint size_type;

value_type scalar_product(const ref vector_t x, const ref vector_t y) {
  value_type res = 0;
  size_type siz = x.length;
  for (size_type i = 0; i < siz; ++i)
    res += x[i] * y[i];
  return res;
}

int main() {   
  auto tm_before = Clock.currTime();

  // 1. allocate and fill randomly many short vectors
  vector_t[] xs;
  xs.length = N;
  for (int i = 0; i < N; ++i) {
    xs[i].length = size;
  }
  writefln("allocation: %i ", (Clock.currTime() - tm_before));
  tm_before = Clock.currTime();

  for (int i = 0; i < N; ++i)
    for (int j = 0; j < size; ++j)
      xs[i][j] = uniform(-1000, 1000);
  writefln("random: %i ", (Clock.currTime() - tm_before));
  tm_before = Clock.currTime();

  // 2. compute all pairwise scalar products:
  result_type avg = cast(result_type) 0;
  for (int i = 0; i < N; ++i)
    for (int j = 0; j < N; ++j) 
      avg += scalar_product(xs[i], xs[j]);
  avg = avg / N*N;
  writefln("result: %d", avg);
  auto time = Clock.currTime() - tm_before;
  writefln("scalar products: %i ", time);

  return 0;
}
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3  
By the way, your program has a bug on this line: avg = avg / N*N (order of operations). –  CyberShadow Feb 28 '11 at 14:05
4  
You can try to rewrite the code using array/vector operations digitalmars.com/d/2.0/arrays.html –  Michal Minich Feb 28 '11 at 16:17
7  
To provide a better comparison you should use the same compiler back-end. Either DMD and DMC++ or GDC and G++ –  he_the_great Feb 28 '11 at 19:38
1  
@Sion Sheevok Unfortunately, dmd profiling seems not to be available for Linux? (please correct me if I am wrong, but if I say dmd ... trace.def I get an error: unrecognized file extension def. And the dmd docs for optlink mention only Windows. –  Lars Feb 28 '11 at 23:03
1  
Ah, never cared about that .def file it spits out. Timings are inside the .log file. "It contains the list of the functions in the order the linker should link them" - maybe that helps optlink to optimize something? Also note that "In addition, ld fully supports the standard "*.def" files, which may be specified on the linker command line like an object file" - so you could try to pass trace.def via -L if you dearly want to. –  Trass3r Mar 3 '11 at 11:58
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7 Answers 7

up vote 33 down vote accepted

To enable all optimizations and disable all safety checks, compile your D program with the following DMD flags:

-O -inline -release -noboundscheck

EDIT: I've tried your programs with g++, dmd and gdc. dmd does lag behind, but gdc achieves performance very close to g++. The commandline I used was gdmd -O -release -inline (gdmd is a wrapper around gdc which accepts dmd options).

Looking at the assembler listing, it looks like neither dmd nor gdc inlined scalar_product, but g++/gdc did emit MMX instructions, so they might be auto-vectorizing the loop.

share|improve this answer
2  
@CyberShadow: but if you remove the safety check... aren't you losing some important features of D ? –  Matthieu M. Feb 28 '11 at 13:37
16  
You are losing features which C++ never had. Most languages don't give you a choice. –  CyberShadow Feb 28 '11 at 13:45
4  
@CyberShadow: can we think of this as a sort of a debug vs release build? –  Francesco Feb 28 '11 at 15:10
5  
@Bernard: in -release, bounds checking is turned off for all code except safe functions. to really turn off bounds checking use both -release and-noboundscheck. –  Michal Minich Feb 28 '11 at 16:06
2  
@CyberShadow Thanks! With these flags runtime improves considerably. Now D is at 12.9 s. But still runs more than 3 times as long. @Matthieu M. I would not mind to test a program with boundschecking in slow motion and once it is debugged let it do its computations without boundschecking. (I do the same with C++ now.) –  Lars Feb 28 '11 at 21:59
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One big thing that slows D down is a subpar garbage collection implementation. Benchmarks that don't heavily stress the GC will show very similar performance to C and C++ code compiled with the same compiler backend. Benchmarks that do heavily stress the GC will show that D performs abysmally. Rest assured, though, this is a single (albeit severe) quality-of-implementation issue, not a baked-in guarantee of slowness. Also, D gives you the ability to opt out of GC and tune memory management in performance-critical bits, while still using it in the less performance-critical 95% of your code.

I've put some effort into improving GC performance lately and the results have been rather dramatic, at least on synthetic benchmarks. Hopefully these changes will be integrated into one of the next few releases and will mitigate the issue.

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1  
I noticed one of your changes was a change from division to bit shift. Shouldn't that be something the compiler does? –  GManNickG Feb 28 '11 at 21:40
2  
@GMan: Yes, if the value you're dividing by is known at compile time. No, if the value is only known at runtime, which was the case where I made that optimization. –  dsimcha Feb 28 '11 at 21:46
    
@dsimcha: Hm. I figure if you know to make it, the compiler can too. Quality of implementation issue, or am I missing that some condition needs to be satisfied that the compiler cannot prove, but you know? (I'm learning D now, so these little things about the compiler are suddenly interesting to me. :)) –  GManNickG Feb 28 '11 at 21:53
5  
@GMan: Bit shifting only works if the number you're dividing by is a power of two. The compiler cannot prove this if the number is known only at runtime, and testing and branching would be slower than just using the div instruction. My case is unusual because the value is known only at runtime, but I know at compile time that it's going to be some power of two. –  dsimcha Feb 28 '11 at 21:56
6  
Note that the program posted in this example doesn't do allocation in the time-consuming portion. –  CyberShadow Feb 28 '11 at 23:25
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This is a very instructive thread, thanks for all the work to the OP and helpers.

One note - this test is not assessing the general question of abstraction/feature penalty or even that of backend quality. It focuses on virtually one optimization (loop optimization). I think it's fair to say that gcc's backend is somewhat more refined than dmd's, but it would be a mistake to assume that the gap between them is as large for all tasks.

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4  
I completely agree. As added later on, I am mainly interested in performance for numerical computations where loop optimization probably is the most important one. Which other optimizations do you think would be important for numerical computing? And which computations would test them? I would be interested to complement my test and implement some more tests (if they are roughly as simple). But evtl. this is another question in its own? –  Lars Mar 2 '11 at 21:41
1  
As an engineer that cut his teeth on C++, you are a hero of mine. Respectfully, however, this should be a comment, not an answer. –  Alan Mar 29 at 7:18
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dmd is the reference implementation of the language and thus most work is put into the frontend to fix bugs rather than optimizing the backend.

"in" is faster in your case cause you are using dynamic arrays which are reference types. With ref you introduce another level of indirection (which is normally used to alter the array itself and not only the contents).

Vectors are usually implemented with structs where const ref makes perfect sense. See smallptD vs. smallpt for a real-world example featuring loads of vector operations and randomness.

Note that 64-Bit can also make a difference. I once missed that on x64 gcc compiles 64-Bit code while dmd still defaults to 32 (will change when the 64-Bit codegen matures). There was a remarkable speedup with "dmd -m64 ...".

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Whether C++ or D is faster is likely to be highly dependent on what you're doing. I would think that when comparing well-written C++ to well-written D code, they would generally either be of similar speed, or C++ would be faster, but what the particular compiler manages to optimize could have a big effect completely aside from the language itself.

However, there are a few cases where D stands a good chance of beating C++ for speed. The main one which comes to mind would be string processing. Thanks to D's array slicing capabalities, strings (and arrays in general) can be processed much faster than you can readily do in C++. For D1, Tango's XML processor is extremely fast, thanks primarily to D's array slicing capabilities (and hopefully D2 will have a similarly fast XML parser once the one that's currently being worked on for Phobos has been completed). So, ultimately whether D or C++ is going to be faster is going to be very dependent on what you're doing.

Now, I am suprised that you're seeing such a difference in speed in this particular case, but it is the sort of thing that I would expect to improve as dmd improves. Using gdc might yield better results and would likely be a closer comparison of the language itself (rather than the backend) given that it's gcc-based. But it wouldn't surprise me at all if there are a number of things which could be done to speed up the code that dmd generates. I don't think that there's much question that gcc is more mature than dmd at this point. And code optimizations are one of the prime fruits of code maturity.

Ultimately, what matters is how well dmd performs for your particular application, but I do agree that it would definitely be nice to know how well C++ and D compare in general. In theory, they should be pretty much the same, but it really depends on the implementation. I think that a comprehensive set of benchmarks would be required to really test how well the two presently compare however.

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4  
Yes I would be surprised if input/output was significantly faster in either language, or if pure math were significantly faster in either language, but string operations, memory management, and a few other things could easily let one language shine. –  Max Lybbert Feb 28 '11 at 18:25
1  
It's easy to do better (faster) than C++ iostreams. But that's primarily a library implementation issue (on all known versions from the most popular vendors). –  Ben Voigt Feb 28 '11 at 23:41
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You can write C code is D so as far as which is faster, it will depend on a lot of things:

  • What compiler you use
  • What feature you use
  • how aggressively you optimize

Differences in the first aren't fair to drag in. The second might give C++ an advantage as it, if anything, has fewer heavy features. The third is the fun one: D code in some ways is easier to optimize because in general it is easier to understand. Also it has the ability to do a large degree of generative programing allowing things like verbose and repetitive but fast code to be written in a shorter forms.

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Seems like a quality of implementation issue. For example, here's what I've been testing with:

import std.datetime, std.stdio, std.random;

version = ManualInline;

immutable N = 20000;
immutable Size = 10;

alias int value_type;
alias long result_type;
alias value_type[] vector_type;

result_type scalar_product(in vector_type x, in vector_type y)
in
{
    assert(x.length == y.length);
}
body
{
    result_type result = 0;

    foreach(i; 0 .. x.length)
        result += x[i] * y[i];

    return result;
}

void main()
{   
    auto startTime = Clock.currTime();

    // 1. allocate vectors
    vector_type[] vectors = new vector_type[N];
    foreach(ref vec; vectors)
        vec = new value_type[Size];

    auto time = Clock.currTime() - startTime;
    writefln("allocation: %s ", time);
    startTime = Clock.currTime();

    // 2. randomize vectors
    foreach(ref vec; vectors)
        foreach(ref e; vec)
            e = uniform(-1000, 1000);

    time = Clock.currTime() - startTime;
    writefln("random: %s ", time);
    startTime = Clock.currTime();

    // 3. compute all pairwise scalar products
    result_type avg = 0;

    foreach(vecA; vectors)
        foreach(vecB; vectors)
        {
            version(ManualInline)
            {
                result_type result = 0;

                foreach(i; 0 .. vecA.length)
                    result += vecA[i] * vecB[i];

                avg += result;
            }
            else
            {
                avg += scalar_product(vecA, vecB);
            }
        }

    avg = avg / (N * N);

    time = Clock.currTime() - startTime;
    writefln("scalar products: %s ", time);
    writefln("result: %s", avg);
}

With ManualInline defined I get 28 seconds, but without I get 32. So the compiler isn't even inlining this simple function, which I think it's clear it should be.

(My command line is dmd -O -noboundscheck -inline -release ....)

share|improve this answer
    
Your timings are meaningless unless you give the comparison to your C++ timings also. –  Daniel Jun 22 '11 at 6:59
2  
@Daniel: You're missing the point. It was to demonstrate the D optimizations in isolation, namely for the conclusion I stated: "So the compiler isn't even inlining this simple function, which I think it's clear it should be." I'm even attempting to compare it to C++, as I clearly stated in the first sentence: "Seems like a quality of implementation issue." –  GManNickG Jun 22 '11 at 8:01
    
Ah true, sorry :). You'll also find the DMD compiler doesn't vectorise the loops at all either. –  Daniel Jun 22 '11 at 8:38
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