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I was looking to see what would be the best way to handle errors from functions. Is the "DIE" method appropriate?

ie. php function calls another, for example:

function login(){
     $result = verifyDetails("bob", "password123");
     if($result == "accepted"){
          echo "Welcome bob";
     }else{
          echo "Error!! \n";
          echo $result;
     }
}

function verifyDetails($user, $pass){
     if(empty($user) || empty($pass)){
          die("cannot be empty");
     }

     if($user == "bob" && $pass == "password"){
          return "accepted";
     }else{
          die("username or password incorrect");
     }
}

does the "DIE" method return the message or does everything come to a standstill?

thanks in advance


UPDATE

what if the output is not known?

for example. in the above example I have placed "accepted" as the only correct answer.

What if the return is a name or id number.. then you cant really separate the error and correct returns.

thanks again.


UPDATE / Possible Solution

function login(){
     $result = verifyDetails("bob", "password123");
     if($result[0] == "SUCCESS"){
          echo "Welcome bob";
     }else if($result[0] == "ERROR"){
          echo "Error!! \n";
          echo $result;
     }else{
          echo "Unknown Error!!";
     }

}

function verifyDetails($user, $pass){
     $msg = array();

     if(empty($user) || empty($pass)){
          $msg[0] = "ERROR";
          $msg[1] = "cannot be empty"
          return $msg;
     }

     if($user == "bob" && $pass == "password"){
          //say $customerID is extracted from a db
          $msg[0] = "SUCCESS";
          $msg[1] = $customerID
          return $msg;
     }else{
          $msg[0] = "ERROR";
          $msg[1] = "username or password incorrect"
          return $msg;
     }
}

ideas & suggestions on the above "possible" solution are welcome


UPDATE

Check Shikiryu update 2 answer below for a cleaner version using arrays

share|improve this question
    
You may want to read about Exceptions. Using die() is a relatively good solution when you must terminate the script execution. –  mailo Feb 28 '11 at 13:42
    
@mailo exceptions shouldn't be used to handle application logic. –  Your Common Sense Feb 28 '11 at 13:45
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

die() just echo your message and stop the script because die() is an alias of exit().

In your case, since the password isn't password but password123, the script will stop just displaying "username or password incorrect".

But as I can see here, you want a return "cannot be empty";, so that it'll display :

Error!! username or password incorrect

(and optionally the rest of the html which die() won't)


Update 2 (ugly way) :

function login(){
     $result = verifyDetails("bob", "password123");
     if(isset($result['success']){ // verifyDetails return true?
          echo $result['success'];
     }else{
          echo "Error!! \n";
          echo $result['error']; // Display the error verifyDetails throws
          // You may want to check if $result['error'] exists.
     }
}

function verifyDetails($user, $pass){
     if(empty($user) || empty($pass)){
          return array('error'=>"cannot be empty");
     }

     if($user == "bob" && $pass == "password"){
          return array('success'=>"Welcome bob");
     }else{
          return array('error'=>"username or password incorrect");
     }
}
share|improve this answer
    
updated question –  Stevanicus Feb 28 '11 at 14:10
    
@Stevanicus : updated answer –  Shikiryu Feb 28 '11 at 14:33
    
thanks... the only problem I have if the "return true" is any unknown value... like a customerID or first name" hard to pick what is an error message and what isnt –  Stevanicus Feb 28 '11 at 14:38
    
@Stevanicus : I updated but I'm not quite satisfied. It works, but looks ugly to me. –  Shikiryu Feb 28 '11 at 14:45
    
yea that what I put as my possible solution... yours looks cleaner than mine atleast :D but same idea. Like you im not quite satisfied either. –  Stevanicus Feb 28 '11 at 14:54
add comment

die terminates the execution of the PHP script at the line it is called. Therefore, your message would no be returned.

You might want to simply use return instead of die;

share|improve this answer
    
updated question –  Stevanicus Feb 28 '11 at 14:11
add comment

Yes, you could use die() to debug.

does the "DIE" method return the message or does everything come to a standstill?

Yes, it returns the error message and yes, the script will stop continuing.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Well the only acceptable way in your case is return FALSE

if these functions are really methods of some class, use class variable to store actual errors. if these functions belongs to no class, I wouldn't use them at all, but write it in plain code

 if($user == "bob" && $pass = "password"){
      echo "Welcome bob";
 }else{
       echo "incorrect username or password");
 }

updated answer

Well there is nothing to invent. Just follow the way PHP goes:
Make your function return either value or FALSE

however, for the validation purpose you have to make it this way:

function validSomething($val){
  return (bool)rand(0,1);
}
$err = array();
if (!validSomething($var)) {
  $err[] = "Whatever error";
}

i.e. function returns only boolean values and actual error message being added by application logic.

However, in your example user-defined functions are totally misused.

share|improve this answer
    
updated question –  Stevanicus Feb 28 '11 at 14:09
    
the problem with just returning false is that, you wont know where the error is –  Stevanicus Feb 28 '11 at 14:17
    
@Stevanicus see updated answer. make your validation functions check one parameter at a time - so, you will always know. However, talking of such imaginary example a pain. I'd prefer real case to discuss. –  Your Common Sense Feb 28 '11 at 14:21
    
$pass = "password" should be $pass == "password" here, typo ;) ? –  Shikiryu Feb 28 '11 at 14:27
    
Ouch typo by the OP, my bad :) –  Shikiryu Feb 28 '11 at 14:28
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