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I have a Postgres DB, with a column named t_time of type timestamp with time zone.

When I use the psql tool to see the contents of the column, I get, for example:

select t_time from table1 where  ...

       t_time      
---------------------
 2011-02-28 14:09:25
 2011-02-28 14:09:23

This is the format I want.

However, when I run the same select query through my Java code, which uses Hibernate, I get the following:

 2011-02-28 14:09:25.0
 2011-02-28 14:09:23.0

As you can see, at the end a dot and a zero are added.

My question is - how do I specify the format I want to use?

Changing the query, for example like this,

select to_char(t_time, 'YYYY-MM-DD HH24:MI:ss') as t_time from table1 where ...

is possible, but less desired since I have a few places in the code that query for the data and I do not wish to change each of them, I would like the definition to be system-wide.

Thanks for your help.


EDIT:

I wanted to add a clarification: When I wrote this, I was thinking of the direction of editing the mapping file. I thought that there might be a way to define the format there. That would mean changing in one place only, and not relying on any default format.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
What is the hibernate java data type + mapping information? – Heiko Rupp Feb 28 '11 at 14:05
    
Are you happy to change your postgres schema, seeing as you do not want to change your code? – user533832 Feb 28 '11 at 14:25
    
@Heiko Rupp: the java data type is Timestamp. – Dikla Mar 1 '11 at 6:51
    
@JackPDouglas: no, I'd rather change the code on several locations than change the schema. – Dikla Mar 1 '11 at 6:55

I think the use of a date formatter is always a good idea.

Date t_time = table1Entity.t_time;
String t_time_str = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss").format(t_time);
share|improve this answer
    
the question says "I have a few places in the code that query for the data and I do not wish to change each of them" – user533832 Feb 28 '11 at 14:20
    
@JackPDouglas: Thanks for the hint. I've overlooked that. But the answer might be helpful to anyone who is overlooking that too. ;-) – splash Feb 28 '11 at 14:26
    
true enough :-) – user533832 Feb 28 '11 at 14:47

is possible, but less desired since I have a few places in the code that query for the data and I do not wish to change each of them, I would like the definition to be system-wide.

You have a timestamp in your database (non-varchar). You have a "timestamp" in your Java (non-String, probably a Date or Calendar). The difference is in the String/textual representation that the client is providing to you, be it psql, be it "toString()" method of your Java object. If you used a different database client, I bet the output would be a third variation :-)

My point is: you should not depend on the String representation of dates (or any other non-String object, for that matter). If any of your code depends on that, I'd say it's wrong. Period.

And if you need to touch more than one file to change how a date is represented as text for your end-user, then I'd say that you have an opportunity for change there: externalize the date format and free your code from "fixed" configuration.

In short: use splash's approach.

share|improve this answer
    
I thought about changing the mapping to include the format, so I won't rely on any default representation. Is there such option? – Dikla Mar 1 '11 at 6:57
    
The correct representation of a timestamp in Java is a Date or Calendar object. Mapping a String representation for a database timestamp is suboptimal. But if you indeed need this, you can create your UserType and tell Hibernate to use it instead of the default type which handles timestamps. – jpkrohling Mar 1 '11 at 14:42
    
How do I do that? Do you have a link or some other information? Thanks! – Dikla Mar 2 '11 at 6:33
    
Look at the code from the test suite, here: github.com/hibernate/hibernate-core/tree/master/hibernate-core/… . Or, if you prefer, you can look at the actual implementation for the Timestamp type: github.com/hibernate/hibernate-core/blob/master/hibernate-core/… – jpkrohling Mar 2 '11 at 6:40

Hibernate doesn't have a datatype timestamp with time zone, it has timestamp and timezone but that takes two fields, not just one field.

http://www.java2s.com/Code/Java/Hibernate/JavaTypeVSHibernateType.htm

share|improve this answer
    
The mapping is to Timestamp. I don't care about the timezone here. Thanks. – Dikla Mar 1 '11 at 6:54

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