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I have the following class (doesn't compile):

public class Field {
    public string fldName { get; set; }
    public object fldValue { get; set; }
    public Field() { }
    public Field(string name, object value) {
        fldName = name;
        Type type = Type.GetType(value);
        fldValue = Activator.CreateInstance(type);
        if (value == null) fldValue = ""; // forces object to be a string
    }
}

I'm trying to get this to work with passing in either a string or another class I created. If I set:

fldValue = value;

It only copies the object by reference instead of instantiating a new class. I'm not sure whether I need a generic here or not but would prefer to do without. I'm also unsure of whether or not I need to deep copy the argument object to the new instance object if this code did work.

The properties of the class I want to copy into fldValue besides a string looks like this:

 public class DateReminder {
            public DateTime reminderDate {get; set;}
            public bool remindDate { get; set; }
            public int warningTime {get; set;}
            public bool remindWarn { get; set; }
    }

For anyone interested, solved by doing the following:

 public class Field {

        public string fldName { get; set; }
        [XmlElement( typeof(string))]
        [XmlElement(typeof(DateReminder))]
        public object fldValue { get; set; }

        public Field() { }

        public Field(Field inField) {
            this.fldName = inField.fldName;
            if (inField.fldValue.GetType() == typeof(DateReminder)) {
                fldValue = (DateReminder)inField.fldValue;
            }
            else fldValue = inField.fldValue;
        }

        public Field(string name, object value) {
            if (value == null) {
                value = "";
            }
            fldName = name;
            fldValue = value;
        }
    }

and DateReminder has its own copy constructor.

share|improve this question
    
FYI there's no such thing as "C#.NET". It's just "C#". –  John Saunders Feb 28 '11 at 17:04
    
The point about whether to deep copy is one that you're going to have to answer. The value parameter is passed by reference, so you're going to have to decide for yourself whether you want to clone it, and the way that you do that is going to depend on the type of the object being passed in. Is there any way you can constrain it a bit more? –  Mel Harbour Feb 28 '11 at 17:05
    
Can you be more specific about what you're asking? I'm not sure of the question. Also, you might think about different overloads for your constructor, one if it's passed a string and the other if it's passed a plain old object. Having your constructor perform logic to distinguish between them makes it hard for the compiler (and the programmer) to know what's going on. –  Jeremy Todd Feb 28 '11 at 17:08
    
I suppose I do want to deep copy the class into the object fldValue. I just tried making a copy constructor on the DateReminder class and doing just fldValue=value but it did not work. –  Omar Feb 28 '11 at 17:26

1 Answer 1

It's important to understand that the value of the value variable is a reference, not an object. That value is copied directly into fldValue by the statement

fldValue = value;

So yes, fldValue will refer to whatever object value referred to.

I would suggest performing the copy in the calling code instead of in the constructor... otherwise you won't know whether you need to copy or not, or indeed how to create a copy.

What are you trying to achieve, ultimately, and what's not working for you?

share|improve this answer
    
I'm trying to use a Fields class to contain Fields that each have a name which will be a label on a WPF application. The fldValue will be either a string or a DateReminder class, both having their own control associated with it. It would be convenient to pass in any object to the fldValue and have it be a deep copy of whatever object it should be. –  Omar Feb 28 '11 at 17:13
    
@Omar: But how deep would you need it to be? That's the tricky bit. If nothing else is retaining a reference, copying is pointless. If it's actually immutable (like string), copying is pointless. If it's something like a FileStream, copying is probably meaningless. –  Jon Skeet Feb 28 '11 at 17:14
    
Also I'm not sure how I would even begin writing code to make a copy to an object. I'm familiar with copy constructors in the C++ sense, but do they work when you assign another object's type to an object? –  Omar Feb 28 '11 at 17:17
    
public class DateReminder { public DateTime reminderDate {get; set;} public bool remindDate { get; set; } public int warningTime {get; set;} public bool remindWarn { get; set; } } Sorry maybe having the properties for the class I want to copy might help? Having trouble with formatting, will put this in main question. –  Omar Feb 28 '11 at 17:18
    
@Omar: Any chance you could change DateReminder to be immutable instead? Pass the values into the constructor, and only provide "getter" access. (I'd also suggest you start following .NET naming conventions, where properties are in PascalCase.) –  Jon Skeet Feb 28 '11 at 17:25

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