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DON'T ASK WHY but...

I have a regex that needs to be case insensitive if run on windows BUT case sensitive when run on *nix.

Here is an example snippet of what I am kind-of doing at the moment.

sub relative_path 
{
    my ($root, $path) = @_;

    if ($os eq "windows")
    {
        # case insensitive with regex option 'i'
        if ($path !~ /^\Q$root\E[\\\/](.*)$/i)
        {
            print "\tFAIL:$root not in $path\n";
        }
        else
        {
            return $1;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        # case sensitive
        if ($path !~ /^\Q$root\E[\\\/](.*)$/)
        {
            print "\tFAIL:$root not in $path\n";
        }
        else
        {
            return $1;
        }
    }
    return "";
}

Argh! The repetition hurts my OCD but my perl-fu is weak. Somehow I want to make the regex option 'i' for case-insensitive conditional but I don't now how?

share|improve this question
3  
you can programmatically determine if the OS is windows with: my $is_windows = $^O =~ /mswin/i; –  Eric Strom Feb 28 '11 at 19:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can create patterns and store them in scalars using the qr operator:

sub relative_path 
{
    my ($root, $path) = @_;

    my $pattern = ($os eq "windows") ? qr/^\Q$root\E[\\\/](.*)$/i : qr/^\Q$root\E[\\\/](.*)$/;

    if ($path !~ $pattern)
    {
        print "\tFAIL:$root not in $path\n";
    }
    else
    {
        return $1;
    }
}

This might not be 100% perfect, but hopefully you should get the idea.

Make sure to check out the section "Quote and Quote-Like Operators" in perlop.


EDIT: Okay, here's a DRY solution since people are complaining about it.

sub relative_path 
{
    my ($root, $path) = @_;

    my $base_pattern = qr/^\Q$root\E[\\\/](.*)$/;
    my $pattern = ($os eq "windows") ? qr/$base_pattern/i : $base_pattern;

    if ($path !~ $pattern)
    {
        print "\tFAIL:$root not in $path\n";
    }
    else
    {
        return $1;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I golf'd the $pattern definition logic a bit-- you can use if-else if you prefer. You'll still get a MASSIVE win on saving code repetition and LOC. –  Platinum Azure Feb 28 '11 at 17:15
    
Aha the Quote Regex like operators were what I was missing! perldoc.perl.org/perlop.html#Regexp-Quote-Like-Operators –  Simon Peverett Feb 28 '11 at 17:20
    
@Pev: Yeah. Oops, I should have linked you to that section instead :-) –  Platinum Azure Feb 28 '11 at 17:28
    
I went with this one. –  Simon Peverett Feb 28 '11 at 17:36
    
The disadvantage of this solution is that it violates DRY (don't repeat yourself). You still need to change the regex in two places, if you want to change it... –  markijbema Mar 1 '11 at 14:32

You can use an extended construct to specify the option. For example:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use warnings; use strict;

my $s = 'S';

print check($s, 'i'), "\n";
print check($s, '-i'), "\n";

sub check {
    my ($s, $opt) = @_;
    return "Matched" if $s =~ /(?$opt)^s\z/;
    return "Did not match";
}

See perldoc perlre.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. This might be the better/more extensible answer for if you want to have lots of conditional options (besides case sensitivity). –  Platinum Azure Feb 28 '11 at 17:18
2  
+1 because of DRY. I want to point out that (?p does not work on perl 5.8.9, and it is not mentioned in the perlre doc for that version. It does seem to work without the p on 5.8.9, however. My guess is that ?p was added in 5.10 –  toolic Feb 28 '11 at 18:00
1  
(?p) turns on the /p modifier, which preserves the string matched such that ${^PREMATCH}, ${^MATCH}, and ${^POSTMATCH} are available for use after matching. I don't see any reason why you'd want that turned on in this case. Just use (?$opt). –  cjm Feb 28 '11 at 19:04
1  
@cjm: I copied and pasted too fast. In fact, p is an option I have never used before, so I did not notice it. Correcting my post now. –  Sinan Ünür Feb 28 '11 at 19:17
    
Aha! I wondered why it didn't work for me, stuck as I am with 5.8.9. –  Simon Peverett Mar 1 '11 at 8:23

In addition to achieving the stated objective, this properly handles volumes unlike the regex patterns previously posted.

use Path::Class qw( dir );

sub relative_path {
   my ($root, $path) = @_;

   if ($^O =~ /Win32/) {
      require Win32;
      $root = Win32::GetLongPathName($root);
      $path = Win32::GetLongPathName($path);
   }

   $root = dir($root);
   $path = dir($path);

   if ($root->subsumes($path)) {
      return $path->relative($root);
   } else {
      print "\tFAIL:$root not in $path\n";
      return "";
   }
}

By the way, it's not very appropriate to handle the error there. The function should return an error signal (return undef, throw an exception, etc) and the caller should handle it as it sees fit. Separations of concerns.

share|improve this answer

You can also do it using local modifiers (perl extended regexes option):

sub relative_path 
{
    my ($root, $path) = @_;

    my $pattern = "^\Q$root\E[\\\/](.*)$";
    $pattern = "(?i)$pattern" if ($os eq "windows");
    if ($path =~ /$pattern/)
    {
        return $1;
    }
    else
    {
        print "\tFAIL:$root not in $path\n";
    }
}

(after I typed my answer I saw that Sinan also suggested it, but I decided to post my answer as well, since it gives a concreter answer to the question)

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 The reason I did not use the OP's patterns is simple: I do not understand what it is doing and I strongly suspect there is a better way to do this than using regular expressions ;-) –  Sinan Ünür Mar 1 '11 at 3:08
    
Heh, you're right. I must admit I did not really try to look at the problem at hand. I just refactored the code ;) Most of the time that is a useful step though when you have code which is not up to scratch, because if the code is also very long, and duplicated, it's harder to see the intention. I think ikegami's solution looks rather neat :) –  markijbema Mar 1 '11 at 9:39

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