Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have something like this:

if (item.type == 'course') {

Problem is, if item.type is undefined, trying to check it would cause node.js to crash.

Is there a short way to get it to return false if undefined?

Thanks!

Edit: Sorry, item is undefined!

TypeError: Cannot read property 'type' of undefined
share|improve this question
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It crashes if item is undefined, not the property "type", because you try to access a property of a non-existing object.

Do this:

if (item && item.type === "course") {

}

(yes, THREE "=")

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, and it should not crash if item.type === undefined, but just return false. Why the triple equal? In this particular case I can't find an example where it would behave differently than double equal. I agree about making a habit of it though. –  silviot Feb 28 '11 at 17:23
2  
Try 3=="3" vs. 3==="3", == does an implicit type conversion. But you are right, here we compare with a definite fixed string. It's a personal habit of mine to always use === instead of trying to decide each and every single time I use a comparison - it's too easy to get it wrong in a big project. I follow most of Douglas Crockford's JS coding convention recommendations and this is one of them and it makes sense. In individual examples you can always argue, my policy makes sense in the context of projects, not individual cases. –  Mörre Feb 28 '11 at 17:24
    
I agree about following Crockford's suggestions: I do it myself. I was asking because the fact that you insisted about using triple in this case made me wonder that I was missing some particular case of this sample code. –  silviot Feb 28 '11 at 17:50
add comment

This should take care of it

if (typeof(item.type) != "undefined" && item.type == "course")
share|improve this answer
2  
typeof is an operator, so the parentheses around item.type are not required. –  davidchambers Apr 1 '11 at 16:43
add comment

You mention node.js, and I don't know much about that, but in standard javascript you won't get a crash when you access an undefined member variable. I ran the following in the Google Chrome javascript console:

> a = {}
Object
> a.type
undefined
> a.type == "course"
false
> a.type == undefined
true
> a.type = 1
1
> a.type == undefined
false
share|improve this answer
2  
Always use === when comparing to undefined, since null == undefined evaluates as true. –  davidchambers Apr 1 '11 at 16:45
add comment

If you are sure the object/instance item exists, this is a little trick to check for its property type:

if ((item||{}).type === 'course') {
  //do things ...
}

If item could exist in the global namespace (ie window) you could use:

if ((window.item||{}).type === 'course') {
  //do things ...
}

Otherwise something like

if ( !/undef/i.test(typeof item) && item.type === 'course')

will do

You could also use a little helper function to test for variable existence:

function exists(vartest){
    return !/undef/i.test(vartest);
}
//usage:
console.log(exists(typeof item));
share|improve this answer
add comment

You could also try this:

try {
  if (item.type == 'course') {
    ...
  }
  // add more sneaky code here
} catch (e) {
  // do you want to report something went wrong?
}
share|improve this answer
3  
NO. You should NOT use try-catch for "expected" errors - and this is one that can be expected in normal execution of the program. –  Mörre Feb 28 '11 at 17:22
    
Ouch, you're right. Duly noted! –  Federico Cáceres Feb 28 '11 at 17:25
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.