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i = i + j ;
j = i - j ;
i = i - j ;

What the above code do ? Can someone write the same operation with other code ?

thnx.

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1  
appears to reverse the two numbers. (Try for yourself) –  Brad Christie Feb 28 '11 at 17:33
1  
standard answer to the question, "swap two integers without using intermediate temporary variable. –  Nishant Feb 28 '11 at 17:33
1  
above code does mathematical operations - namely addition, subtraction and assignment ;-) - writing same with other code may look like this - int temp = i; i = j; j = temp –  ring bearer Feb 28 '11 at 17:35
1  
before asking Qs like this, try running this code a few times with sample values and learn the pattern. –  asgs Feb 28 '11 at 17:37

10 Answers 10

up vote 12 down vote accepted

It swaps i and j. Assuming they have initial values of a and b, the lines evaluate to:

i = a + b;
j = (a + b) - b; // = a
i = (a + b) - a; // = b

To answer the second part of your question, an alternative (and more than likely, the approach that would be taken in real life, non-interview situations) would look something like the following:

int tmp = i;
i = j;
j = tmp;
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4  
To be pernickity, it swaps i and j assuming that they are integers and that either overflow does not occur or is handled appropriately by the language. If they are not integers then loss of precision can occur. –  DJClayworth Feb 28 '11 at 18:25
    
What do you mean by "handled appropriately"? Simply ignoring the overflow works fine. –  maaartinus Mar 1 '11 at 11:44
    
One of the 'appropriate' handlings (what you call 'ignoring') is to return the correct result missing any high level bits that cannot be represented. Most languages do that. However a language that returned the highest representable integer when overflow occurred, or one that threw an exception, would be an example of 'inappropriate' handling and would result in this code not working. –  DJClayworth Mar 2 '11 at 17:04

It's a technique to swap the values of i and j without creating a temporary variable. It's a form of memory optimization

If you're interested in learning about some of these things, I found a site about swapping values:

http://booleandreams.wordpress.com/2008/07/30/how-to-swap-values-of-two-variables-without-using-a-third-variable/

Another way to swap values is with the bitwise operator Exclusive Or (XOR)

a = a ^ b

b = a ^ b

a = a ^ b

This way is my favorite personally because it's more fun to think about conceptually. Integers are sets of bits, (ones and zeros)

a 64 bit integer has 64 "ones and zeros"

The ones and zeros are binary.

1 = 1

10 = 2

11 = 3

100 = 4

101 = 5

111 = 6

That's an example of binary to decimal. Now the bitwise operator XOR works like flipping a switch. So:

2 ^ 1 = 3 :binary: 10 ^ 01 = 11

and

3 ^ 2 = 1 :binary: 11 ^ 10 = 01 = 1

Now now that you understand that, you can see how swapping variables with it might work out.

Let's set a = 3 and b = 2 (in binary) and try it

a = 100

b = 10

a = a ^ b :: a = 100 ^ 10 = 110

b = a ^ b :: b = 110 ^ 10 = 100

a = a ^ b :: a = 110 ^ 100 = 10

now a = 10 and b = 100 or a = 2 and b = 3

Welcome to bits!

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As I thought... And can you give an example of other code that do the same (of course not only change parameter's names)? Thanks ! –  Batman Feb 28 '11 at 17:36
    
@Mosh Sure, you mean another technique for swapping variables? –  Dbz Feb 28 '11 at 17:39

Temporary variable swap

And most used swap method involves using a temporary variable:

T swap = i;
i = j;
j = swap;
swap = null; // or let it fell out of scope

Aritmetical swap

i = i + j ;
j = i - j ; // i + j - j = i
i = i - j ; // i + j - (i + j - j) = j

This hack only works if:

  • i and j are integers and their sum is between 2147483647 and -2147483648.
  • i and j are longs and their sum is between 9223372036854775807 and -9223372036854775808.

xor swap

There is a similar xor swap hack

i = i ^ j;
j = i ^ j; // i ^ j ^ j = i
i = i ^ j; // i ^ j ^ i ^ j ^ j = j

And it's slight variation of:

a[i] = a[i] ^ a[j];
a[j] = a[i] ^ a[j]; 
a[i] = a[i] ^ a[j]; 

This hack only works if:

  • i != j, two indexes refer to the same element and thy cancel each-other out.
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Don't think the bit about them being equal is right. if this was the case then since all the bits are independent it wouldnt work for any number which had coincident 1 or 0 bits. pretty sure it does work if i = j –  aronp Feb 28 '11 at 18:40

The obvious way to do this with other code would be:

const int tmp = i;
i = j;
j = tmp;

This assumes that the type is int. Note that this swap trick is not safe if there is integer overflow/underflow risks in the computations. It's also not very clear, people who read it need to think pretty hard to understand what's going on (or ask someone).

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Over/underflow isn't a problem here, it'll work independent of that (at least as long as you use 2s complement). –  Voo Feb 28 '11 at 17:44
    
why use const here ? –  Batman Feb 28 '11 at 17:49

It swaps them - but it's easier to tell this if you use different variable names to keep things clear:

int originalI = ...;
int originalJ = ...;

int tmp = originalI + originalJ;
int newJ = tmp - originalJ;
int newI = tmp - newJ;

Now perform substitutions:

int originalI = ...;
int originalJ = ...;

int tmp = originalI + originalJ;
int newJ = originalI + originalJ - originalJ;
int newI = originalI + originalJ - (originalI + originalJ - originalJ);

... and simplify:

int originalI = ...;
int originalJ = ...;

int tmp = originalI + originalJ;
int newJ = originalI;
int newI = originalJ;

... and remove the temporary variable:

int originalI = ...;
int originalJ = ...;

int newJ = originalI;
int newI = originalJ;
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It looks like its swapping i and j.

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It swaps the variables.

Another way:

i ^= j;
j ^= i;
i ^= j;
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Assuming i and j are numeric primitives, assuming the operators operate like they do in Java, C++, or the like, and assuming the operators have not be redefined, then we can look at this line of code like this:

i = i + j;
j = i - j;
i = i - j;

Here, i becomes the sum of the two variables. In the second line of code though, we remove j from that sum and assign it to j. We can therefore reduce the first two lines to the following:

j = i;

Variable j now equals our original i. But currently, i doesn't have the same value it started with. Right now, i is equivalent to the sum of the original two values. In the next line of code, we say:
i = i - j, which in pseudocode is equivalent to:
i = originalSum - originalValueOf_i; //The original j.

So, basically, all of the original code is equivalent to a swapping routine, i.e.:

tempVal = i;
i = j;
j = tempVal;


We can even try an example involving positive and negative values to see that this is true:

i = -24.3;
j = 10.4;
//Original code:
i = i + j; //i now equals -13.9
j = i - j; //j now equals -13.9 - 10.4, which is -24.3 (our original i value).
i = i - j; //i now equals -13.9 - (-24.3), which is 10.4 (our original j).


Someone may have written the swap you posted in the way he/she did to avoid method call overhead, declaring new variables, etc., but if you're going to be swapping values a lot, using the code you posted over and over could get icky. A swap routine like the one shown above is fairly common.

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i gets j's value. And j keeps it's value.

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That would be i = j; –  Dbz Feb 28 '11 at 18:10
    
but ofcourse, one of the operators he gave there is wrong, I had this question once. –  Cu7l4ss Feb 28 '11 at 19:26

It switches the values of i and j:

i = i+j;
j = (original_i + j) - j = original_i;
i = original_i + original_j - original_i = original_j;

Yes, there are other ways to do this operation.

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