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In the piece of code that I'm working on, another developer's library fires off one of my object's methods on regular, scheduled intervals. I've run into problems where the previous call into my object's method has not completed at the time another interval is reached and a second call is made into my method to execute again - the two threads then end up stepping on each other. I'd like to be able to wrap the method's implementation with a check to see whether it is in the middle of processing and skip over the block if so.

A lock is similar to what I want, but doesn't quite cover it because a lock will block and the call into my method will pick up as soon as the previous instance releases the lock. That's not what I want to happen because I could potentially end up with a large number of these calls backed up and all waiting to process one by one. Instead, I'd like something similar to a lock, but without the block so that execution will continue after the block of code that would normally be surrounded by the lock.

What I came up with was a counter to be used with Interlocked.Increment and Interlocked.Decrement to allow me to use a simple if statement to determine whether execution on the method should continue.

public class Processor
{
    private long _numberOfThreadsRunning = 0;

    public void PerformProcessing()
    {
        long currentThreadNumber Interlocked.Increment(ref _numberOfThreadsRunning);
        if(currentThreadNumber == 1)
        {
            // Do something...
        }
        Interlocked.Decrement(ref _numberOfThreadsRunning);
    }
}

I feel like I'm overthinking this and there may be a simpler solution out there.

share|improve this question
    
could you just use a skipto? –  Chimoo Feb 28 '11 at 18:02
    
I'm not familiar with what a "skipto" is. –  carmbrester Feb 28 '11 at 18:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You could call Monitor.TryEnter and just continue if it returns false.

share|improve this answer
    
Perfect. Cleaner and makes much more sense than my original solution. –  carmbrester Feb 28 '11 at 18:33
public class Processor
{
    private readonly object lockObject = new object();

    public void PerformProcessing()
    {
        if (Monitor.TryEnter(lockObject) == true)
        {
            try
            {
                // Do something...
            }
            finally
            {
                Monitor.Exit(lockObject);
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

How about adding a flag to the object. In the method set the flag true to indicated the method is being executed. At the very end of the method, reset it to false. Then you could check the status of the flag to know if the method can be called.

share|improve this answer
    
My concern with this approach is being able to turn the checking of the flag and setting the flag into one atomic operation. –  carmbrester Feb 28 '11 at 18:31

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