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I'm very new to Node.js and I'm sure there's an easy answer to this, I just can't find it :(

I'm using the filesystem to hold 'packages' (folders with a status extensions 'mypackage.idle') Users can perform actions on these which would cause the status to go to something like 'qa', or 'deploying' etc... If the server is accepting lots of requests and multiple requests come in for the same package how would I check the status and then perform an action, which would change the status, guaranteeing that another request didn't alter it before/during the action took place?

so in c# something like this

lock (someLock) { checkStatus(); performAction(); }

Thanks :)

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are no locks in node.js -- because you shouldn't need them. There's only one thread (the event loop) and your code is never interrupted unless you perform an asynchronous action like I/O. Hence your code should never block. You can't do any parallel code execution.

That said, your code could look something like this:

qa_action_performed = false
function handle_request() {
  if (check_status() == STATUS_QA && !qa_action_performed) {
    qa_action_performed = true
    perform_action()
  }
}

Between check_status() and perform_action() no other thread can interrupt because there is no I/O. As soon as you enter the if clause and set qa_action_performed = true, no other code will enter the if block and hence perform_action() is never executed twice, even if perform_action() takes time performing I/O.

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nice! thank you. So even though http.createServer could asynchronously handle hundreds of requests per second only one of those requests could enter the 'handle_request' function above at a time? –  Justin Feb 28 '11 at 20:36
1  
As the code stands above, yes. If you have async I/O in check_status(), e.g., because you need to access a DB or the file system, you would use a callback, like check_status(function(result) { if (result == STATUS_QA && ... }). In this case multiple requests can enter handle_request(), but with !qa_action_performed you are still protected against multiple execution sof perform_action(). –  alienhard Mar 1 '11 at 7:25
    
Nice! exactly what I was after. Thanks for your response/info on this :) –  Justin Mar 2 '11 at 17:00
4  
I find this "no parallel code execution" meme in Node.js to be perplexing. If you have two tasks (T1 and T2) and each one requires, say, 10 asynchronous callbacks to be chained together, then some callbacks for T2 will execute while T1 waits for an async operation to finish. Is this not T1 and T2 executing in "parallell"? If T1 and T2 have some shared, non-reentrant resource, do they not need to lock that resource to ensure these two tasks don't corrupt it? –  mehaase Nov 7 '13 at 16:33
4  
-1 for because you shouldn't need them. You absolutely do need them (as mentioned by @mehaase) unless your app is nothing more then a calculator. –  freakish Apr 15 '14 at 5:58

This is a bit misleading. There are many script languages that are suppose to be single threaded, but when sharing data from the same source this creates a problem. NodeJs might be single threaded when you are running a single request, but when you have multiple requests trying to access the same data, it just behaves as it creates kind of the same problem as if you were running a multithreaded language.

There is already an answer about this here : Locking on an object?

WATCH sentinel_key
GET value_of_interest
if (value_of_interest = FULL)
    MULTI
    SET sentinel_key = foo
    EXEC
    if (EXEC returned 1, i.e. succeeded)
        do_something();
    else
        do_nothing();
else
    UNWATCH
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9  
link provided is an exercise in recursion. –  Robert Martin Apr 24 '12 at 19:42
    
Ambiguous answer. If by "data" this is referring to filesystems, databases, and external processes then yes locking is still a problem. If this is referring to in-process data structures then locking is not a problem, as described by other answers here. –  Richard Marr Oct 26 '12 at 14:42
    
@RichardMarr Of course it is. If you have a function T that chains 10 asynchronous operations that alter shared data structure (all inside Node.js process) then what will happen if you run T twice in a row? There's a race condition. –  freakish Apr 15 '14 at 6:04
    
@freakish locking isn't a solution to race conditions. Race conditions are when memory is written in an unexpected order. Locking doesn't correct the order of writes, it just provides a way to make each thread wait for the previous thread to finish writing. The outcome of running T twice in parallel on Node will be exactly the same if you ran it in two threads on the JVM with appropriate threading and locking. Both would exhibit a race condition. –  Richard Marr Apr 15 '14 at 11:17
1  
-1 All this arguing, and nobody even mentions that @lac_dev answered a node.js question with an example written in CLIPS :) WTF –  mehaase Jun 14 '14 at 21:52

If checkStatus() and performAction() are synchronous functions called one after another, then as others mentioned earlier: their exectution will run uninterupted till completion. However, I suspect that in reality both of these functions are asynchoronous, and the realistic case of composing them is something like:

function checkStatus(callback){
  doSomeIOStuff(function(something){
    callback(something == ok);
  });
}

checkStatus(function(status){
  if(status == true){
    performAction();
  }
});

The above code is subject to race conditions, as when doSomeIOStuff is being perfomed instead of waiting for it new request can be served.

You may want to check https://www.npmjs.com/package/rwlock library.

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You don't have to worry about synchronization with Node.js since it's single threaded with an event loop. This is one of the advantage of the architecture that Node.js use.

Nothing will be executed between checkStatus() and performAction().

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1  
-1 Unless checkStatus() performs any async operations... –  mehaase Jun 14 '14 at 22:02

warning, node.js change semantic if you add a log entry beucause logging is IO bound.

if you change from

qa_action_performed = false
function handle_request() {
  if (check_status() == STATUS_QA && !qa_action_performed) {
    qa_action_performed = true
    perform_action()
  }
}

to

qa_action_performed = false
function handle_request() {
  if (check_status() == STATUS_QA && !qa_action_performed) {
    console.log("my log stuff");
    qa_action_performed = true
    perform_action()
  }
}

more than one thread can execute perform_action().

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1  
Can you provide more information about that? Doesn't seem to be the case from my sample code. process.nextTick(function(){ console.log('NEXT TICK'); }); for ( var i = 0; i < 10000; i++ ){ console.log(i) } –  Richard Marr Oct 26 '12 at 14:34
    
This is not correct. console.log is a blocking function. Even if it were not, the worst that could happen is the console output would be jumbled. –  jnylen May 14 '13 at 3:08

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