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I'm using SQL Server 2005/2008. I need to add a column to a table if it does not yet exist. This will apply to all tables in a given database. I hoped I was close, but I'm having issues with this solution.

How can this be done?

Here's what I have:

EXEC sp_MSforeachtable '
    declare @tblname varchar(255);
    SET @tblname =  PARSENAME("?",1);

    if not exists (select column_name from INFORMATION_SCHEMA.columns 
                   where table_name = @tblname and column_name = ''CreatedOn'') 
    begin
        ALTER TABLE @tblname ADD CreatedOn datetime NOT NULL DEFAULT getdate();
    end
'

But I get errors:

Error 102: Incorrect syntax near '@tblname'.
Incorrect syntax near 'CreatedOn'.
Incorrect syntax near '@tblname'.
Incorrect syntax near 'CreatedOn'.
... and so on, for each table.
share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/1779743/… –  JAiro Feb 28 '11 at 18:38
    
@JAiro: That is definitely a relevant link, but the "if not exists" rule is important and makes it a little more complex. –  Scott Stafford Feb 28 '11 at 18:41
    
ok so you could complete the information with this : stackoverflow.com/questions/133031/… –  JAiro Feb 28 '11 at 18:44
    
Your root cause of the problem is relying on the INFORMATION_SCHEMA view and having to split the name into schema and object. Just use object_id(''?'') and you'll be fine. An even faster check is if COLUMNPROPERTY(object_id(''?''), ''CreatedOn'', ''ColumnId'') is null. –  Remus Rusanu Feb 28 '11 at 18:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You cannot use variables, like @tableName, in DDL. Besides, splinting the name into part and ignoring the schema can only result in bugs. You should just use the ''?'' replacement in the SQL batch parameter and rely on the MSforeachtable replacement:

EXEC sp_MSforeachtable '
if not exists (select * from sys.columns 
               where object_id = object_id(''?'')
               and name = ''CreatedOn'') 
begin
    ALTER TABLE ? ADD CreatedOn datetime NOT NULL DEFAULT getdate();
end';
share|improve this answer
    
Keep in mind that sp_msforeachtable is an unsupported stored procedure, so it should not be used for production code. Although it adds a few lines of code, if you use a cursor defined as a select from sys.schemas and sys.tables, you are using a documented part of T-SQL, you have the option of affecting all or some of the tables by merely changing a WHERE expression, and the performance is the same. Also, you have fewer name qualifiers to deal with if you use the quotename function. Lastly, you have more flexibility in using the schema/table names however you wish (i.e. for a log). –  Phil Helmer Mar 1 '11 at 7:01

You'll need to mix in a bit of dynamic SQL. This should work:

EXEC sp_MSforeachtable '
    declare @tblname varchar(255);
    SET @tblname =  PARSENAME("?",1);
    declare @sql nvarchar(1000);

    if not exists (select column_name from INFORMATION_SCHEMA.columns 
                   where table_name = @tblname and column_name = ''CreatedOn'') 
    begin
        set @sql = N''ALTER TABLE '' +  @tblname + N'' ADD CreatedOn datetime NOT NULL DEFAULT getdate();''
        exec sp_executesql @sql
    end
'
share|improve this answer
    
How about two tables with same name in different schemas? foo.t and bar.t... –  Remus Rusanu Feb 28 '11 at 18:53
    
@Remus: Yes, if OP is using schemas, then this becomes an issue. +1 to your answer. –  Joe Stefanelli Feb 28 '11 at 18:56

Maybe like this:

EXEC sp_MSforeachtable '
    declare @tblname varchar(255);
    SET @tblname =  PARSENAME("?",1);

    if not exists (select column_name from INFORMATION_SCHEMA.columns 
                   where table_name = @tblname and column_name = ''CreatedOn'') 
    begin
        ALTER TABLE [?] ADD CreatedOn datetime NOT NULL DEFAULT getdate();
    end
'

?

Or even like this:

EXEC sp_MSforeachtable '
    if not exists (select column_name from INFORMATION_SCHEMA.columns 
                   where table_name = ''?'' and column_name = ''CreatedOn'') 
    begin
        ALTER TABLE [?] ADD CreatedOn datetime NOT NULL DEFAULT getdate();
    end
'
share|improve this answer
2  
-1 obviously haven't tested this before posting. [?] adds bracket around around an already bracketed name, resulting in [[schemaname].[tablename]] which is incorrect. –  Remus Rusanu Feb 28 '11 at 18:52
    
@Remus Rusanu: I tested this: sp_MSforeachtable 'EXEC sp_help ?; EXEC sp_columns ?'. That gave a syntax error. I then changed it to sp_MSforeachtable 'EXEC sp_help [?]; EXEC sp_columns [?]', and it worked (SQL Server 2008 R2). –  Andriy M Feb 28 '11 at 19:32
    
...yet you did not test the OP ALTER TABLE [?]. Both sp_help and sp_columns are stored procedures, and the ? replacement is not going to work because sp_help [foo].[bar] is invalid syntax. But sp_help [[foo]].[bar]]] is correct syntax and due to how parameters are handled, it actually ends up working. ALTER TABLE [[foo]].[bar]]] though does not work. Too keep a long story short: the code you posted does not pass basic syntax checks, and this can be verified by anybody. –  Remus Rusanu Feb 28 '11 at 20:05
    
@Remus Rusanu: And I'm not arguing. I posted my test example for two reasons: to provide the cause of my delusion and to possibly have someone explain me why I was deluded (beside the obvious reason of my being ignorant). So, in the end, thanks. :) –  Andriy M Feb 28 '11 at 20:16
    
Oh, sry, then I misinterpreted your comments. The fact that sp_help [?] works the way it is at least mystifying for me as well. –  Remus Rusanu Feb 28 '11 at 20:59

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