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I'm getting an error "cannot find symbol method add(java.util.Date)", although what I'm passing it was declared a Date. What am I missing?

import java.util.*;
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.text.*;


class Entry {
    Date date;

    Entry(Date aDate) {
        date = aDate;
    }
}

public class td {
    public static void main(String[] args) { 

        List<Entry> entries = new ArrayList<Entry>();

        DateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd");
        Date aDate = df.parse("2011-02-27"); // Date aDate = new Date() also fails

        entries.add(aDate);

        System.out.println(entries.get(0));
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Are you sure you want not entries.add(new Entry(aDate)); ? It seems to be the purpose of Entry class.

And generally speaking, if you declare list as List<Entry>, you should store Entry instances in it, not Date.

Also, your error says "cannot find symbol method add(java.util.Date)" . So, it's not Date class that's missing. It's add(java.util.Date) method.

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Sigh. You're right. The compiler also insists that I wrap the df.parse statement with try & catch. While I'm at it, I should have entries.get() return something sensible. –  foosion Feb 28 '11 at 19:30
    
@foosion Instead of wrapping, it might be easier to add throws Exception to the main method declaration. Since you can't do anything useful with error, it's better to just let it pass. –  Nikita Rybak Feb 28 '11 at 19:32
    
That is easier. It also prevents "not initialized" errors if I don't declare and initialize aDate outside the try/catch –  foosion Feb 28 '11 at 19:34

To re-iterate: List has add(Entry) method and doesn't have add(Date) method.

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