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How could I emulate the goto programming construct in this case?

$.fn.hierarchy = function(info, ret) {
    if (info.constructor !== Object) {
        info = {children: info};
        goto label1; // Illegal JavaScript
    }

    if (!info.children) {
        info.children = [];
        goto label2; // Illegal JavaScript
    }

    label1:
    if (info.children.constructor !== Array)
        info.children = [info.children];

    label2:
    /*
    // Forget this code. It's irrelevant to my specific problem
    // (which is that JS doens't allow non-nested conditionals)
    //  and caused much confusion.
    if (!info.tagc)
        info.tagc = info.tag || 'div';
    */

I know I could implement exactly ONE of these gotos as an else clause:

$.fn.hierarchy = function(info, ret) {
    if (info.constructor !== Object) {
        info = {children: info};
        //goto label1;
    }

    else if (!info.children) {
        info.children = [];
        goto label2; // Illegal JavaScript
    }

    //label1:
    if (info.children.constructor !== Array)
        info.children = [info.children];

    label2:
    /*
    // Forget this code. It's irrelevant to my specific problem
    // (which is that JS doens't allow non-nested conditionals)
    //  and caused much confusion.
    if (!info.tagc)
        info.tagc = info.tag || 'div';
    */

Or:

$.fn.hierarchy = function(info, ret) {
    if (info.constructor !== Object) {
        info = {children: info};
        goto label1; // Illegal JavaScript
    }

    if (!info.children) {
        info.children = [];
        //goto label2;
    }

    else {
        label1:
        if (info.children.constructor !== Array)
            info.children = [info.children];
    }

    //label2:
    /*
    // Forget this code. It's irrelevant to my specific problem
    // (which is that JS doens't allow non-nested conditionals)
    //  and caused much confusion.
    if (!info.tagc)
        info.tagc = info.tag || 'div';
    */

But I want to have both gotos. And, no, I don't want additional flags.


EDIT:

@Luis Espinal: Your proposed solution doesn't work. If info is {children: 'a'}, your program fails to convert info.children to [a].

$.fn.hierarchy = function(info, ret) {
    if (info.constructor !== Object) {
        info = {children: info};
        // goto label1; // Illegal JavaScript
        // label1:
        if (info.children.constructor !== Array){
            info.children = [info.children];
        }
    }
    else if (!info.children) {
        info.children = [];
        // goto label2; // Illegal JavaScript
        // label2:
        /*
        // Wrong. This has to be placed outside all of this.
        if (!info.tagc)
        {
            info.tagc = info.tag || 'div';
        }
        */
    }
    /* the following code is missing:

    else {
        // Handles the case when info.constructor === Object
        // from the beginning
        // AND
        // info.children isn't an array
        if (info.children.constructor !== Array)
            info.children = [info.children];
    }
    */

EDIT: Some of you seemed to think the fourth conditional is relevant to my problem. The problem is actually that I cannot do the following:

If condition1 Then action1
If !condition1 && condition2 Then action2
If !condition2 && condition3 && regardlessOf(condition1) Then action3

Without using flags (temporary boolean variables).

Basically if condition1 is true, I don't have to test for condition2, and, if condition2 is true, I don't have to test for condition3. But, if condition1 && !condition2, I might have to test for condition3.

share|improve this question
    
Why do you want to resurrect GOTO. Even in Assembly they tried to get rid of them by introducing IF, ELSE, ENDIF (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assembly_language). Structure == Less spaghetti code –  Brandon Boone Feb 28 '11 at 19:32
2  
There are legitimate uses for goto. Sometimes, avoiding goto doesn't make your program more clear. Sometimes, avoiding goto forces you to define additional flags which would be needless in a program with gotos. Sometimes, goto + comments explaining why goto is necessary > additional, needless flags. –  Eduardo León Feb 28 '11 at 19:47
    
There are definitely some legitimate uses for goto, but at least most of them are covered in JavaScript by functions as first-class objects, return, continue, break, break label, and try/finally. I've posted an answer below that uses break label to get what I think you want. –  Ed Bayiates Mar 21 '12 at 3:42

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your function has a non planar control flow graph, and as such cannot be implemented using structured programming logic. If you are concerned with speed, your best bet would be to duplicate label 1 and structure the code as follows:

$.fn.hierarchy = function(info, ret) {
    if (info.constructor !== Object) {
        info = {children: info};
        //goto label1; // Illegal JavaScript
        //label1:
        if (info.children.constructor !== Array)
        {info.children = [info.children];}
    }
    else{
        if (!info.children) {
            info.children = [];
            //goto label2; // Illegal JavaScript
        }
        else{
            //label1:
            if (info.children.constructor !== Array)
            {info.children = [info.children];}
        }
    }

    //label2:
    if (!info.tagc)
    {info.tagc = info.tag || 'div';}
};
share|improve this answer
    
Which is what I don't want to do. –  Eduardo León Feb 28 '11 at 21:54
    
Why not? I'm genuinely curious –  david Feb 28 '11 at 21:58
    
Because I'm a sloppy idiot and, when I have duplicate instances of the same code, I tend to modify one of the copies without updating the other one. And also, because it's inelegant. Code is meant to be both efficiently read by humans (avoid duplication of code) and efficiently executed by computers (avoid executing instructions that don't have to be executed). I don't like compromises. –  Eduardo León Feb 28 '11 at 22:00
1  
Yet you don't want to wrap the code in a function, or use a temporary boolean variable? I get the feeling you're not looking for an answer, you just want to complain that javascript has no goto statement. –  david Feb 28 '11 at 22:07
    
Kind of. I guess two lines of duplicated code won't hurt too much, so I'll take your suggestion, but right now, I'd kill Dijkstra if he weren't already dead. –  Eduardo León Feb 28 '11 at 22:15

Maybe change labels to functions, and gotos to setTimeout(functionname, 0)

For example, instead of:

label1:
    // do something
    goto label2

label2:
    // do something
    goto label1

try something like this:

function label1 () {
    // do something
    setTimeout(label2, 0);
    return; // may be needed if not at the end of function
}

function label2 () {
    // do something
    setTimeout(label1, 0);
    return; // may be needed if not at the end of function
}

(You have to use timeouts because first JavaScript doesn't optimize tail calls (yet) and second because you don't want to block the browser and timeout of 0 puts your callback at the end of the event loop)

share|improve this answer
1  
@Eduardo: Well, because goto statements are considered harmful. ;) –  rsp Feb 28 '11 at 19:36
1  
You trade-off maintainability for some space or function call overhead. The language designers thought that was reasonable. So do I. –  djna Feb 28 '11 at 19:36
2  
@Eduardo - can you quantify the overhead of adding those additional functions? If the overhead is such that justifies looking for goto structures, then either you are using the wrong language (or computing model), or there is something significantly wrong in the design. Even in real-time embedded development, gotos are typically not used unless you can quantify a reason for them or you have a very obscure (and legitimately needed) algorithm or structure. We are talking JavaScript here. –  luis.espinal Feb 28 '11 at 20:50
2  
This is 2011, not 1970. Modern virtual machines (like Rhino or Sun's JVM) with strict pass-by-value references to structures are built to handle that efficiently. This is not like making recursive calls passing entire structures in dumb copy pass-by-value fashion (as one would see in C or Pascal.) Again, you have to characterize the cost, even in highly recursive functions. You must have an idea on the average call weight specific to your app(s). –  luis.espinal Mar 1 '11 at 1:23
1  
And even if that wasn't possible (very unlikely), you have not much choice. Goto is not there, period. So all you can do is structure your code as cleanly as possible (as in this particular case either with flag variables or extra functions). There is an entire body of knowledge out there on how to do that. –  luis.espinal Mar 1 '11 at 1:25

Unless my eyes are failing me or I'm missing an obscure side-effect, the first goto-ridden example is equivalent to the following if-else based version (bless 1960's structured programming constructs):

$.fn.hierarchy = function(info, ret) {
    if (info.constructor !== Object) {
        info = {children: info};
        // goto label1; // Illegal JavaScript
        // label1:
        if (info.children.constructor !== Array){
            info.children = [info.children];
        }
    }
    else if (!info.children) {
        info.children = [];
        // goto label2; // Illegal JavaScript
        // label2:
        if (!info.tagc)
        {
            info.tagc = info.tag || 'div';
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
Your eyes are failing you, and there is no obscure side-effect. –  Eduardo León Feb 28 '11 at 21:09
    
Close, label 2 has to be run by both, so remove it from the else clause. (Oh, and Eduardo, try not to be such a wanker) –  david Feb 28 '11 at 21:12
    
What do you mean by "wanker"? Having conditionals that do not nest? –  Eduardo León Feb 28 '11 at 21:15
    
No, being a "wanker" by not explaining what I missed in my first pass (as david did.) Indeed, mea culpa, label 2 has to be run by both. In that case, just follow Böhm & Jacopini's theorem to its conclusion, and enclose the bloody label2 block into a function being called from both if blocks. The only time I've ever had a need for goto was when implementing inevitably nasty error handling code (think longjmp/setjmp) in C (or when coding in assembler). Only a couple of times in a HL in 17 years of practice. Sorry man, this is JavaScript, not some obscure C/asm code dealing with interrupts. –  luis.espinal Mar 1 '11 at 1:30

JavaScript does have a break label statement that can be used to exit any block of code early. I believe you would get the effect you are seeking considering your first code snippet if you did something like this:

var ft = function(info, ret) {
    label2: {
        label1: {
            if (info.constructor !== Object) {
                info = {children: info};
                break label1;
            }
            else if (!info.children) {
                info.children = [];
                break label2;
            }
        }
        //label1:
        if (info.children.constructor !== Array)
            info.children = [info.children];
    }
    // label2:
    /*
    // Forget this code. It's irrelevant to my specific problem
    // (which is that JS doens't allow non-nested conditionals)
    //  and caused much confusion.
    if (!info.tagc)
        info.tagc = info.tag || 'div';
    */
};

Break label is not really quite goto, and doesn't allow you to write the kind of spaghetti that goto would. It's somewhat structured in that it only exits its current block early, so you could not avoid the label2 processing after jumping to label1, but then your original code snippet didn't so this might fulfill what you are looking for.

share|improve this answer

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