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I have the following viewmodel definition

public class AccessRequestViewModel
{
    public Request Request { get; private set; }
    public SelectList Buildings { get; private set; }
    public List<Person> Persons { get; private set; }
}

So in my application there must be at least 1 person for an access request. What approach might you use to validate? I don't want this validation to happen in my controller which would be simple to do. Is the only choice a custom validation attribute?

Edit: Currently performing this validation with FluentValidation (nice library!)

RuleFor(vm => vm.Persons)
                .Must((vm, person) => person.Count > 0)
                .WithMessage("At least one person is required");
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4 Answers 4

up vote 34 down vote accepted

If you are using Data Annotations to perform validation you might need a custom attribute:

public class EnsureOneElementAttribute : ValidationAttribute
{
    public override bool IsValid(object value)
    {
        var list = value as IList;
        if (list != null)
        {
            return list.Count > 0;
        }
        return false;
    }
}

and then:

[EnsureOneElement(ErrorMessage = "At least a person is required")]
public List<Person> Persons { get; private set; }

or to make it more generic:

public class EnsureMinimumElementsAttribute : ValidationAttribute
{
    private readonly int _minElements;
    public EnsureMinimumElementsAttribute(int minElements)
    {
        _minElements = minElements;
    }

    public override bool IsValid(object value)
    {
        var list = value as IList;
        if (list != null)
        {
            return list.Count >= _minElements;
        }
        return false;
    }
}

and then:

[EnsureMinimumElements(1, ErrorMessage = "At least a person is required")]
public List<Person> Persons { get; private set; }

Personally I use FluentValidation.NET instead of Data Annotations to perform validation because I prefer the imperative validation logic instead of the declarative. I think it is more powerful. So my validation rule would simply look like this:

RuleFor(x => x.Persons)
    .Must(x => x.Count > 0)
    .WithMessage("At least a person is required");
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It looks like I need to use the overload Must() to use persons.Count, please see my edit and let me know if you have a version that is friendlier :) –  ryan Mar 1 '11 at 13:45
1  
@ryan, indeed there are two overloads of this method as shown in the documentation. So my version is friendlier. Don't worry if Visual Studio underlines it as error. It should work if you try to compile. It's just that VS Intellisense is not advanced enough to understand it :-) So RuleFor(x => x.Persons).Must(x => x.Count > 0).WithMessage("At least a person is required"); will compile and work fine. –  Darin Dimitrov Mar 1 '11 at 13:47
    
Strange, now it isn't underlining. Thanks! –  ryan Mar 1 '11 at 14:11
    
Thank you Darin, you picked a cool attribute name (: Just curious if you are using any validation framework for client-side as well. Built-in data annotations provide the advantage of client side if one find useful. –  Zefnus Oct 15 '14 at 14:06

It would be very clean and elegant to have a custom validation. Something like this:

public class AccessRequestViewModel
{
    public Request Request { get; private set; }
    public SelectList Buildings { get; private set; }
    [AtLeastOneItem]
    public List<Person> Persons { get; private set; }
}

Or [MinimumItems(1)].

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One approach could be to use a private constructor and a static method to return an instance of the object.

public class AccessRequestViewModel
{
    private AccessRequesetViewModel() { };

    public static GetAccessRequestViewModel (List<Person> persons)
    {
            return new AccessRequestViewModel()
            {
                Persons = persons,
            };
    }

    public Request Request { get; private set; }
    public SelectList Buildings { get; private set; }
    public List<Person> Persons { get; private set; }
}

By always using the factory to instantiate your ViewModel, you can ensure that there will always be a person.

This probably isn't ideal for what you want, but it would likely work.

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You have two choices here, either create a Custom Validation Attribute and decorate the property with it, or you can make your ViewModel implement the IValidatableObject interface (which defines a Validate method)

Hope this helps :)

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