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I'm wondering what's better for my server (speed, etc), considering CPU, bandwidth and diskspace usage.

Currently my server is about to explode, too much MySQL/PHP requests, and so on, that's why I'm optimizing my application (discussed in this question: Best way to scale data, decrease loading time, make my webhost happy).

Now, what's the best solution to decrease CPU, bandwidth and diskspace usage?

1) Fetch a single big record from a table (100.000+ records, let's say 20kb/record) and handle the fetch with PHP => only 1 request, but the result may cause a heavy server load?

2) Fetch multiple small records from a table (1.000.000+ records, let's say 1kb/record) => significant more MySQL requests needed to get the same result as the result in method 1

Method 1 will cause the database to become lots of GBs (10+). Using method 2 the database will be smaller, but I'm not sure about the effect of running a lot of queries on the performance of my application?

Returning a mysql_result() from a table of 1.000.000+ records takes more time, because it needs to scan all the rows for a specific records?

Hope you can tell me what method is better to decrease CPU, bandwidth and diskspace usage!

Edit

I currently have one table: facebook_id, friends_json. In friends_json, the uid AND name of every friend of this facebook_id user is stored. Using this method, every record is about 10kb. Once this record is requested, I don't have to do extra requests to fetch the name of a friend: this is already included in the friends_json.

My question is whether it is better to only store the friends' uids in the friends_json, so that for each friend I have to run a query to another table (friends_names) to fetch the name of this friend from this table (if not available, request it from Facebook). This second method saves diskspace, but I really have to do a large amount of requests before I can show the user a result.

The goal is that I have to compare the list of friends in my database with a current list of friends. If a user deleted his/her Facebook profile, I can't request the corresponding name anymore, that's why I have to save the names in my database.

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It depends on how the data is being used, but multiple connections means connection overhead you can't recoup (as well as concurrency concerns). –  OMG Ponies Feb 28 '11 at 19:52
2  
Since this is MYSQL-PHP, I am assuming it is an online request kind of application instead of something that runs over night..like a batch process. Where would you come across the need to query 100000 records? –  Rajesh Chamarthi Feb 28 '11 at 19:55
    
I'm confused as to why the amount of data stored would change based on how you plan to query it... use an appropriate JOIN to get what you need. –  Ben L. Feb 28 '11 at 20:21
    
Indeed, an online request by a user, not a batch process. I can link a uid to a name using json {"uid":name","uid":"name"}, but I can also store the names in another table. The first json method creates a single big request, the second method of the extra table of names creates multiple small requests: for each uid searching through all the records for the corresponding name. –  Robin Feb 28 '11 at 20:27
    
Is upgrading your hosting cheaper than your time spent optimizing? –  James Hall Feb 28 '11 at 21:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since the question is not clear enough (or I cant understand it correctly) I would assume that you have 1 table having 2 columns : facebook_id, friends_json and you are requesting all the friends of friends. This is the worst case I can ever think of. still all you have to do is 2 simple query :

  1. get the subject's with 1 index hit, then get uid's from json decoding it
  2. get all friend's friend list with an "in" query using the ids, then push them all into a map to get rid of duplicates.

none of the queries above needs to scan whole table (and its the worst case)

if you can give more info about your table structure and your goal (what you want to retrieve from that data) we can help more.

Edit: Nothing can save your server if you have to do a table scan in every hit.

Edit:

I currently have one table: facebook_id, friends_json. In friends_json, the uid AND name of every friend of this facebook_id user is stored. Using this method, every record is about 10kb. Once this record is requested, I don't have to do extra requests to fetch the name of a friend: this is already included in the friends_json.

My question is whether it is better to only store the friends' uids in the friends_json, so that for each friend I have to run a query to another table (friends_names) to fetch the name of this friend from this table (if not available, request it from Facebook). This second method saves diskspace, but I really have to do a large amount of requests before I can show the user a result.

The goal is that I have to compare the list of friends in my database with a current list of friends. If a user deleted his/her Facebook profile, I can't request the corresponding name anymore, that's why I have to save the names in my database.

As long as you get the result with hitting index the size of table or the row wouldn't affect as much as you think. And a join just to get names when you keep uid's normalized is not the way to go. Eighter you keep a "users" table with "uid, name" columns and friendship table "uid1, uid2" or you have normalized data including both uid and name. And about the new and old friendlist comparison, you should do it in php anyway using uid's (not the names). get friendlist from facebook, compare it with current friendlist, find the differences and apply to database. In this case you shouldn't have to table scan at any point of your application.

Here is the normal way to do it (without json):

fb_users table : uid, name, is_app_user (PK: uid) fb_friends table : uid1, uid2 (PK: uid1, uid2)

get friends sql query :

SELECT ff.uid1, fu.name FROM fb_friends ff
LEFT JOIN fb_users fu ON ff.uid1 = fu.uid
WHERE ff.uid2 = $FBID 
UNION
SELECT ff.uid2, fu.name FROM fb_friends ff
LEFT JOIN fb_users fu ON ff.uid2 = fu.uid
WHERE ff.uid1 = $FBID

and to add users you can do a neat trick to update the name everytime for name changes (which is used most of the time) :

INSERT INTO fb_users(uid,name) 
VALUES 
($FBUD1, $FBNAME1), 
($FBUD2, $FBNAME2) 
...
ON DUPLICATE KEY name = VALUES(name)

and to add friends you can do a trick aswell so you don't have to worry about having A B and B A at the same time :

INSERT IGNORE INTO fb_friends(uid, uid1) VALUES(" . min($uid, $uid1) . ", " . max($uid, $uid1) . ");

these are just tricks if you decide to keep your data relational, but I would suggest keeping it normalized anyway. your json method is what is used in most cases, and don't worry about space alot, since the data size is usually not the thing that blocks the servers, its the way you request data (code) and the way you grab it(sql queries) is where you should tune.

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I just edited my question with more information, hope you can give me advice! –  Robin Mar 1 '11 at 9:38
    
I also edited the answer according to your edits, hope it would be useful. –  frail Mar 1 '11 at 10:29
    
Hey frail, I'm implementing your ON DUPLICATE method, but mysql returns an error: mysql_query('INSERT INTO friend_names (uid,name) VALUES ("'.$uid.'","'.$name.'") ON DUPLICATE KEY name = VALUES(name)'); Any idea what's wrong with this code? Thanks! –  Robin Mar 5 '11 at 16:08
    
Fixed! mysql_query('INSERT INTO friends_names (uid,name) VALUES ("'.$uid.'","'.$name.'") ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE name = VALUES(name)'); => the UPDATE term was missing! –  Robin Mar 5 '11 at 16:21

Always request what you need, in small portions. User may interrupt the script execution just by hitting ESC on his keyboard [unless you have ignore_user_abort() in place]. So go slow and steady.

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So, it's better to make 300 small requests - each request searching through a table containing 1.000.000+ rows for a specific record - instead of making 1 big request? –  Robin Feb 28 '11 at 20:21
    
I would say yes, if it is Internet app of course. If things run within the Intranet and/or it is a scheduled task, keep the workload at max capacity, but try not to overload the server. –  Shehi Feb 28 '11 at 20:46

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