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How do I count the number of records returned by a group by query,

For eg:

select count(*) 
from temptable
group by column_1, column_2, column_3, column_4

Gives me,

1
1
2

I need to count the above records to get 1+1+1 = 3.

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1  
Just remove the groupby??? –  LorenVS Feb 28 '11 at 20:07
    
@LorenVS: But that would give me a count of the number of records in the table. I need number of records after the group by happens. –  Chris Feb 28 '11 at 20:08
1  
The group by doesn't change the number of rows though. 1 + 1 + 2 (in your example) will be the number of rows in the table. Are you looking for 3? The number of distinct groups? –  LorenVS Feb 28 '11 at 20:10

9 Answers 9

up vote 37 down vote accepted

You can do both in one query using the OVER clause on another COUNT

select
    count(*) RecordsPerGroup,
    COUNT(*) OVER () AS TotalRecords
from temptable
group by column_1, column_2, column_3, column_4
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I know this is a SQL-Server question, but for reference: This does not work on DB/2 (in my case on IBM iSeries). See my comment at Thomas´s answer –  Bjinse Dec 13 '12 at 8:05
    
How would I echo that counted number? –  McDan Garrett Nov 18 '13 at 11:38
    
@McDanGarrett: what do you mean sorry? –  gbn Nov 18 '13 at 13:18
    
It's okay @gbn, I worked it out :) –  McDan Garrett Nov 24 '13 at 21:52

The simplest solution is to use a derived table:

Select Count(*)
From    (
        Select ...
        From TempTable
        Group By column_1, column_2, column_3, column_4
        ) As Z

Another solution is to use a Count Distinct:

Select ...
    , ( Select Count( Distinct column_1, column_2, column_3, column_4 )
        From TempTable ) As CountOfItems
From TempTable
Group By column_1, column_2, column_3, column_4
share|improve this answer
    
The first answer also works on DB/2, but for some reason it needs the addition AS TMP to work (like troutinator added) –  Bjinse Dec 13 '12 at 8:08
1  
@Bjinse - Some DBMS will require that all derived tables have an alias. They all will accept it so it won't hurt to include it. I'll add it to my answer. –  Thomas Dec 13 '12 at 19:34

I know it's rather late, but nobody's suggested this:

select count ( distinct column_1, column_2, column_3, column_4) 
from   temptable

This works in Oracle at least - I don't currently have other databases to test it out on, and I'm not so familiar with T-Sql and MySQL syntax.

Also, I'm not entirely sure whether it's more efficient in the parser to do it this way, or whether everyone else's solution of nesting the select statement is better. But I find this one to be more elegant from a coding perspective.

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1  
Of course, this doesn't work if you have a HAVING clause :-) –  cartbeforehorse May 14 '12 at 16:14

How about:

SELECT count(column_1)
FROM
    (SELECT *
    FROM temptable

    GROUB BY column_1, column_2, column_3, column_4)
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You could do:

select sum(counts) total_records from (
    select count(*) as counts
    from temptable
    group by column_1, column_2, column_3, column_4
) as tmp
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In PostgreSQL this works for me:

select count(count.counts) 
from 
    (select count(*) as counts 
     from table 
     group by concept) as count;
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A CTE worked for me:

with cte as (
  select 1 col1
  from temptable
  group by column_1
)

select COUNT(col1)
from cte;
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I was trying to achieve the same without subquery and was able to get the required result as below

SELECT DISTINCT COUNT(*) OVER () AS TotalRecords
FROM temptable
GROUP BY column_1, column_2, column_3, column_4
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Can you execute the following code below. It worked in Oracle.

SELECT COUNT(COUNT(*))
FROM temptable
GROUP BY column_1, column_2, column_3, column_4
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