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In PostgreSQL, I can do something like this:

ALTER SEQUENCE serial RESTART WITH 0;

Is there an Oracle equivalent?

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Have a look at "Sequence resets" here. –  gerikson Sep 9 '08 at 9:45
2  
WARNING: all of the code below is only valid for sequences that were initially created with "increment by 1". If the original sequence was created with an increment != 1; after applying any of the above procedures, the increment will have changed to 1! The correct increment value to use can be obtained from the user_sequences view. –  user705875 Apr 13 '11 at 10:54

11 Answers 11

up vote 82 down vote accepted

Here is a good procedure for resetting any sequence to 0 from Oracle guru Tom Kyte. Great discussion on the pros and cons in the links below too.

tkyte@TKYTE901.US.ORACLE.COM> 
create or replace
procedure reset_seq( p_seq_name in varchar2 )
is
    l_val number;
begin
    execute immediate
    'select ' || p_seq_name || '.nextval from dual' INTO l_val;

    execute immediate
    'alter sequence ' || p_seq_name || ' increment by -' || l_val || 
                                                          ' minvalue 0';

    execute immediate
    'select ' || p_seq_name || '.nextval from dual' INTO l_val;

    execute immediate
    'alter sequence ' || p_seq_name || ' increment by 1 minvalue 0';
end;
/

From this page: Dynamic SQL to reset sequence value
Another good discussion is also here: How to reset sequences?

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3  
Be careful when using this in concurrent environment. If two users are calling the above procedure at the same time, the sequence will be decremented twice, which will result in a negative value of the sequence. Since the sequence is defined is "min value 0", all calls to nextVal will fail. This includes the call to the reset_seq procedure (since it is using nextval) as first statement. Solution: use DBMS_LOCK to prevent simultanious execution of the above procedure. –  matra Jan 5 '13 at 10:50
    
@Dougman:hi 'm beginner....in the above answer why do u mention into clause in the last instead execute immediate 'select ' || p_seq_name || '.nextval INTO l_val from dual' ; –  Thiyagu ATR Feb 23 '13 at 8:48
    
@Thiyagu: In PL/SQL this is the syntax when using execute immediate to capture the output of a select returning at most 1 row. Here is the documentation on execute immediate: docs.oracle.com/cd/B28359_01/appdev.111/b28370/… –  Dougman Feb 26 '13 at 21:05
    
@matra I don't see a scenario in which one would need to reset a sequence and be in a concurrent environment woth other users of the same sequence. –  Ekevoo Sep 19 at 14:26

A true restart is not possible AFAIK. (Please correct me if I'm wrong!).

However, if you want to set it to 0, you can just delete and recreate it.

If you want to set it to a specific value, you can set the INCREMENT to a negative value and get the next value.

That is, if your sequence is at 500, you can set it to 100 via

ALTER SEQUENCE serial INCREMENT BY -400;
SELECT serial.NEXTVAL FROM foo;
ALTER SEQUENCE serial INCREMENT BY 1;
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2  
Just a note for people in PLSQL. Be sure to add "limit 1;" or "rownum =1" to the select statement otherwise you can end up running nextVal a couple of times and incrementing by -400 however many times. –  user830914 Mar 6 at 21:58

My approach is a teensy extension to Dougman's example.

Extensions are...

Pass in the seed value as a parameter. Why? I like to call the thing resetting the sequence back to the max ID used in some table. I end up calling this proc from another script which executes multiple calls for a whole bunch of sequences, resetting nextval back down to some level which is high enough to not cause primary key violations where I'm using the sequence's value for a unique identifier.

It also honors the previous minvalue. It may in fact push the next value ever higher if the desired p_val or existing minvalue are higher than the current or calculated next value.

Best of all, it can be called to reset to a specified value, and just wait until you see the wrapper "fix all my sequences" procedure at the end.

create or replace
procedure Reset_Sequence( p_seq_name in varchar2, p_val in number default 0)
is
  l_current number := 0;
  l_difference number := 0;
  l_minvalue user_sequences.min_value%type := 0;

begin

  select min_value
  into l_minvalue
  from user_sequences
  where sequence_name = p_seq_name;

  execute immediate
  'select ' || p_seq_name || '.nextval from dual' INTO l_current;

  if p_Val < l_minvalue then
    l_difference := l_minvalue - l_current;
  else
    l_difference := p_Val - l_current;
  end if;

  if l_difference = 0 then
    return;
  end if;

  execute immediate
    'alter sequence ' || p_seq_name || ' increment by ' || l_difference || 
       ' minvalue ' || l_minvalue;

  execute immediate
    'select ' || p_seq_name || '.nextval from dual' INTO l_difference;

  execute immediate
    'alter sequence ' || p_seq_name || ' increment by 1 minvalue ' || l_minvalue;
end Reset_Sequence;

That procedure is useful all by itself, but now let's add another one which calls it and specifies everything programmatically with a sequence naming convention and looking for the maximum value used in an existing table/field...

create or replace
procedure Reset_Sequence_to_Data(
  p_TableName varchar2,
  p_FieldName varchar2
)
is
  l_MaxUsed NUMBER;
BEGIN

  execute immediate
    'select coalesce(max(' || p_FieldName || '),0) from '|| p_TableName into l_MaxUsed;

  Reset_Sequence( p_TableName || '_' || p_Fieldname || '_SEQ', l_MaxUsed );

END Reset_Sequence_to_Data;

Now we're cooking with gas!

The procedure above will check for a field's max value in a table, builds a sequence name from the table/field pair and invokes *"Reset_Sequence"* with that sensed max value.

The final piece in this puzzle and the icing on the cake comes next...

create or replace
procedure Reset_All_Sequences
is
BEGIN

  Reset_Sequence_to_Data( 'ACTIVITYLOG', 'LOGID' );
  Reset_Sequence_to_Data( 'JOBSTATE', 'JOBID' );
  Reset_Sequence_to_Data( 'BATCH', 'BATCHID' );

END Reset_All_Sequences;

In my actual database there are around one hundred other sequences being reset through this mechanism, so there are 97 more calls to *Reset_Sequence_to_Data* in that procedure above.

Love it? Hate it? Indifferent?

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2  
I love it. I would add a variable to get and save the increment by value from the user_sequences table. (It might not be 1). Note: might need to use the all_sequences table instead. In this case you might want to pass in the sequence_owner as well. –  Harv Jul 22 '11 at 15:16
1  
Can't upvote you enough. This is a pretty common problem when you deal with data migration, and this is the best approach AFAIK if you're stuck with sequences. –  Dominique Eav Nov 27 '12 at 16:59
    
Upvoted because this is an excellent approach. Only downside is that it can result in unpredictable behaviour in a RAC system, where l_current may be one of various values, depending on which node the script is run; re-running the script can result in different results. I found if I ran it multiple times it eventually settled on a particular value. –  Jeffrey Kemp Aug 19 at 3:46

This is my approach:

  1. drop the sequence
  2. recreate it

Example:

--Drop sequence

DROP SEQUENCE MY_SEQ;

-- Create sequence 

create sequence MY_SEQ
minvalue 1
maxvalue 999999999999999999999
start with 1
increment by 1
cache 20;
share|improve this answer
13  
Just be aware that the drop will invalidate any objects that depend on that sequence and they will have to be recompiled. –  Dougman Dec 23 '11 at 18:57
6  
You'll also have to re-grant any grants that were given to select from the sequence. –  GreenGiant Jan 7 '13 at 23:37

The following script set the sequence to a desired value:

Given a freshly created sequence named PCS_PROJ_KEY_SEQ and table PCS_PROJ:

BEGIN
   DECLARE
      PROJ_KEY_MAX       NUMBER := 0;
      PROJ_KEY_CURRVAL   NUMBER := 0;
   BEGIN

    SELECT MAX (PROJ_KEY) INTO PROJ_KEY_MAX FROM PCS_PROJ;
    EXECUTE IMMEDIATE 'ALTER SEQUENCE PCS_PROJ_KEY_SEQ INCREMENT BY ' || PROJ_KEY_MAX;
    SELECT PCS_PROJ_KEY_SEQ.NEXTVAL INTO PROJ_KEY_CURRVAL FROM DUAL;
    EXECUTE IMMEDIATE 'ALTER SEQUENCE PCS_PROJ_KEY_SEQ INCREMENT BY 1';

END;
END;
/
share|improve this answer

This stored procedure restarts my sequence:

Create or Replace Procedure Reset_Sequence  
  is
  SeqNbr Number;
begin
   /*  Reset Sequence 'seqXRef_RowID' to 0    */
   Execute Immediate 'Select seqXRef.nextval from dual ' Into SeqNbr;
   Execute Immediate 'Alter sequence  seqXRef increment by - ' || TO_CHAR(SeqNbr) ;
   Execute Immediate 'Select seqXRef.nextval from dual ' Into SeqNbr;
   Execute Immediate 'Alter sequence  seqXRef increment by 1';
END;

/

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+1 - You could also parameterize it to pass in the sequence name. –  DCookie Feb 6 '13 at 4:49
alter sequence serial restart start with 0;

This feature is new in Oracle 12c. It is not included in the official documentation. I found it in scripts generated by the Oracle package DBMS_METADATA_DIFF.

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1) Suppose you create a SEQUENCE like shown below:

CREATE SEQUENCE TESTSEQ
INCREMENT BY 1
MINVALUE 1
MAXVALUE 500
NOCACHE
NOCYCLE
NOORDER

2) Now you fetch values from SEQUENCE. Lets say I have fetched four times as shown below.

SELECT TESTSEQ.NEXTVAL FROM dual
SELECT TESTSEQ.NEXTVAL FROM dual
SELECT TESTSEQ.NEXTVAL FROM dual
SELECT TESTSEQ.NEXTVAL FROM dual

3) After executing above four commands the value of the SEQUENCE will be 4. Now suppose I have reset the value of the SEQUENCE to 1 again. The follow the following steps. Follow all the steps in the same order as shown below:

  1. ALTER SEQUENCE TESTSEQ INCREMENT BY -3;
  2. SELECT TESTSEQ.NEXTVAL FROM dual
  3. ALTER SEQUENCE TESTSEQ INCREMENT BY 1;
  4. SELECT TESTSEQ.NEXTVAL FROM dual
share|improve this answer

Altering the sequence's INCREMENT value, incrementing it, and then altering it back is pretty painless, plus you have the added benefit of not having to re-establish all of the grants as you would had you dropped/recreated the sequence.

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There is another way to reset a sequence in Oracle: set the maxvalue and cycle properties. When the nextval of the sequence hits the maxvalue, if the cycle property is set then it will begin again from the minvalue of the sequence.

The advantage of this method compared to setting a negative increment by is the sequence can continue to be used while the reset process runs, reducing the chance you need to take some form of outage to do the reset.

The value for maxvalue has to be greater than the current nextval, so the procedure below includes an optional parameter allowing a buffer in case the sequence is accessed again between selecting the nextval in the procedure and setting the cycle property.

create sequence s start with 1 increment by 1;

select s.nextval from dual
connect by level <= 20;

   NEXTVAL
----------
         1 
...
        20

create or replace procedure reset_sequence ( i_buffer in pls_integer default 0)
as
  maxval pls_integer;
begin

  maxval := s.nextval + greatest(i_buffer, 0); --ensure we don't go backwards!
  execute immediate 'alter sequence s cycle minvalue 0 maxvalue ' || maxval;
  maxval := s.nextval;
  execute immediate 'alter sequence s nocycle maxvalue 99999999999999';

end;
/
show errors

exec reset_sequence;

select s.nextval from dual;

   NEXTVAL
----------
         1 

The procedure as stands still allows the possibility that another session will fetch the value 0, which may or may not be an issue for you. If it is, you could always:

  • Set minvalue 1 in the first alter
  • Exclude the second nextval fetch
  • Move the statement to set the nocycle property into another procedure, to be run at a later date (assuming you want to do this).
share|improve this answer

You can use the CYCLE option, shown below:

CREATE SEQUENCE test_seq
MINVALUE 0
MAXVALUE 100
START WITH 0
INCREMENT BY 1
CYCLE;

In this case, when the sequence reaches MAXVALUE (100), it will recycle to the MINVALUE (0).

In the case of a decremented sequence, the sequence would recycle to the MAXVALUE.

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