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When to use If-else if-else over switch statments and vice versa

I'm sure they're fundamentally very different things, but in practical use I've never found a case where there's been any difference between

switch (value){
    case 1:
        //Do stuff
        break;
    case 2:
        //Do other stuff
        break;
}

and

if (value == true){
    //Do stuff
}
else{
    //Do other stuff
}

What are some example scenarios where one is more appropriate than the other? How, conceptually, are the different? Are there performance of semantics advantages?

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marked as duplicate by Oded, hvgotcodes, David Thornley, corsiKa, Linus Kleen Feb 28 '11 at 21:33

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
I'm pretty sure that this is a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/427760/…. –  quanticle Feb 28 '11 at 21:27
    
Switch statements allow you to fall through in a much more fluent manner. –  corsiKa Feb 28 '11 at 21:33

2 Answers 2

In conditionals you check against an expression to be true or false; in switch, you check an expression against a value. Depending on the language, you can check against an int or a String for example.

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They are analogous, but not equivalent. The switch/case statement is generally used when deciding what routine to invoke given a particular integer, and is commonly employed for checking an enum. For these cases, it may be more expressive and more readable to use a switch.

The if/else evaluates a boolean expression.

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