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Just a reality check before I refactor this code. It comes from someone who is otherwise competent, as far as I can tell. Here is a sample:

// remove line at the latest list
if($(".extra-space").length > 0) {
    $(".extra-space li:last").addClass("noborder");
}

// select all
if($(".extra-select-all").length > 0) {
    $(".extra-select-all").click(function() {
        if($(this).attr("checked") == true) $(".extra-select-item").attr("checked","checked");
        else $(".extra-select-item").removeAttr("checked");
    });
}

Does anyone know a rationale behind this pattern, or is it just ignorance that the if wrappers are needless?

// remove line at the latest list
$(".extra-space li:last").addClass("noborder");

// select all
$(".extra-select-all").click(function() {
    if($(this).attr("checked") == true) $(".extra-select-item").attr("checked","checked");
    else $(".extra-select-item").removeAttr("checked");
});
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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'd say you are right. No need for the checks.

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Since my question was about "these" statements, your answer is correct. But see also @Krtek's answer, which raised a valid point. –  harpo Feb 28 '11 at 22:31

Programmatically speaking it makes sense because those elements could not exist and the array returned could have a length of 0, but because jQuery is catered to designers and non-programmers, it automatically handles invocations on non-existing elements, meaning you don't really need those checks because jQuery is as dummy-proof as possible.

$('microsoft').addClass('sucks') is perfectly valid because the returned jquery obj has a addClass method it inherits and that method executes regardless whether or not there is an element.

Note: I only speak of pure jQuery methods. If a method is executed which is a custom plugin or even a UI plugin as specified in another answer, the behaviour may differ from the core and in that case, it may be wise to check the .length

Personally, I would always check the .length because that means less ambiguity and guess-work if refactoring happens later down the road, and if mysterious bugs start to crop up my error checking will save time during debugging.

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2  
+1 I see what you did there :) –  Frédéric Hamidi Feb 28 '11 at 21:42
    
This was indeed from a designer. –  harpo Feb 28 '11 at 22:24

Yesterday I would have said that these tests were totally useless, but I ran in a bug today which forces me to give a different answers.

In many cases, like said in the others answers, jQuery is written to handle calling methods on empty sets. But typically :

$('#myDatePicker').datepicker('getDate');

will raise an error (really raise a javascript error, not returning null) if the element with the #datePicker id doesn't exist in the page. So I've had to add a test exactly like the one you want to delete.

I think the overhead is really small, so why modify somethings that works and potentially have bug in the future ?

PS: The datepicker I'm talking about is the one from the jQuery ui package, not some random plugins found on a shady website ;)

edit : before someone asks, something like :

$('#myDatePicker').datepicker('option', 'minDate', new Date());

works just fine, the problem is only with getDate.

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+1. Right... ill-advised as it might be, the argument to a jQuery function can call imperative methods, so even when the result set is empty, the statement is not necessarily side-effect free. –  harpo Feb 28 '11 at 22:30

I'd say the developer who wrote this code in jQuery is probably just switching over from another framework like MooTools and doesn't know about the extent of convenience that jQuery provides. Example: The whole click handler could be shortened to

$(".extra-select-all").click(function() {
    $(".extra-select-item").attr("checked",$(this).attr("checked"));
});

Although I'd probably cache the $(".extra-select-item") in a closure scoped variable.

(
    function()
    {
        var $extraSelect = $(".extra-select-item");
        $(".extra-select-all")
            .click(
                function()
                {
                    $extraSelect.attr("checked", $(this).attr("checked"));
                }
            );
    }
)();

`

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Yeah, I had a feeling about that "checked" business. –  harpo Feb 28 '11 at 22:37

The problem with the way you are doing it is you are forcing the browser to look up the same thing two times in the row.

if($(".extra-space").length > 0) {  //Look up the elements and check length
    $(".extra-space li:last").addClass("noborder"); //Look up the same elements again and than look up the next part and add class
}

A better way is to do

var elems = $(".extra-space") //Look up the elements
if(elems.length > 0) {  //check length
    elems.find("li:last").addClass("noborder"); //find the element from the cached group and add class
}

But if really do not care about if you had matches, than jQuery does the checking for you. So you can just do

$(".extra-space li:last").addClass("noborder");
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IMO I don't think this is a reason to start putting a million if statements in your JS. @Krtek - There are likely to be some potentially serious flaws in an application if your application is relying on a date without first checking that the date is available... this falls into the category of design and logic of the application and should be handled differently to the process of intializing plugins.

The jQuery examples do not include if statements and no errors are raised by the browser if no elements exist. $("#myElement") can return anything from 0 to * number of matched elements - and as I always say - and empty list is still a list... the jQuery libraries are able to handle 0 matched results in the same way they are able to handle many matched results.

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actually, the code wasn't so simple, and actually the bugfix was made way higher in the source. It was for sure a mistake, but after that many code written without if, I didn't think this will raise an error ;) –  krtek Feb 28 '11 at 22:38

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