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I am trying to use the JavaScript Module Pattern and I run into a problem that I am unsure how to get around.

So I have 2 script files as I want to separate my code and make it easier to read.

// script 1

var abc = (function (my, $)
{
    my.events = function ()
   {
        // selectors is from my base file(not shown as I don't think it is needed to be shown)
        // my.selectors.createFrm = '#createFrm'
        var createSubmitFrmHandler = $(my.selectors.createFrm).live('submit', function (e)
        {
            e.preventDefault();
        });

   }

   return my;

} abc || {}, jQuery));

// script 2

var abc = (function (my, $)
{
     my.dialogs = {

        addDialog: function ()
        {
            var $dialog = $('<div></div>').dialog(
            {
                width: 580,
                height: 410,
                resizable: false,
                modal: true,
                autoOpen: false,
                title: 'Basic Dialog',
                buttons:
                    {
                        Cancel: function ()
                        {
                            $(this).dialog('close');
                        },
                        'Create': function ()
                        {

                            jQuery.validator.unobtrusive.parse(my.selectors.createFrm)
                            // this is undefined as page loadup no form was found so live did not kick in
                            my.createSubmitFrmHandler.validate().form();

                        }
                    }
            });

            return $dialog;
        },

    return my;
} abc || {}, jQuery));

So I am not sure how to make sure that createSubmitFrmHandler is defined and continue what I am doing.

Edit

I ended up doing something like this

   var abc = (function (my, $)
    {
        my.events = function ()
       {
            // some one time events here
       }

        my.test = function() 
        {
            var add = $(selectors.createFrm).live('submit', function (e)
            {
                e.preventDefault();
            });

            return add;
        };
    }

The only thing I am unsure is that if I call up this function over and over will it keep making this object or will it look and see that the live is already bound and won't do any more binding?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The point of the module pattern is that Javascript has function scope: variables defined with var are local to the function in which they are defined.

(function() {
    var foo = 'bar';
    // foo == 'bar'
})();
// foo == undefined

Since you define createSubmitFrmHandler in the function which you assign to my.events, you cannot refer to it outside the body of that function. There are several ways around this. The point of passing my to all modules is that they can share secrets through it: you can set my.events.handler = createSubmitFrmHandler in the first module, and my.events.handler will be visible in the other module since my is visible there. You could have my.events() return createSubmitFrmHandler and reference it that way. If the selector is not a costly one, you can simply calculate the value of createSubmitFrmHandler again, and use $(my.selectors.createFrm).validate().form(); in the dialog module instead of trying to reference createSubmitFrmHandler. Whatever suits you.

share|improve this answer
    
@Tgr - Sorry I don't understand what you just said. Don't I have that? $(my.selectors.createFrm).live('submit',..). This literally my first day using the module pattern... – chobo2 Feb 28 '11 at 22:54
    
Do you mean I should have this my.createSubmitFrmHandler.validate().form(); ? If so I tried that and got "my.createSubmitFrmHandler is undefined" – chobo2 Feb 28 '11 at 23:01
    
Updated the answer, hopefully it makes more sense now. – Tgr Mar 1 '11 at 0:28
    
@Tgr - See my edit. – chobo2 Mar 1 '11 at 16:45
    
@chobo2: calling my.test more than once will bind multiple event handlers, but then why would you do that? Since the event handler is live, there is no need to bind it again if e.g. a new form is added. – Tgr Mar 1 '11 at 20:24

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