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I have base-class Base from which is derived Derived1, Derived2 and Derived3.

I have constructed an instance for one of the the derived classes which I store as Base* a. I now need to make a deep copy of the object which I will store as Base* b.

As far as I know, the normal way of copying a class is to use copy constructors and to overload operator=. However since I don't know whether a is of type Derived1, Derived2 or Derived3, I cannot think of a way of using either the copy constructor or operator=. The only way I can think of to cleanly make this work is to implement something like:

class Base
{
public:
  virtual Base* Clone() = 0;

};

and the implement Clone in in the derived class as in:

class Derivedn : public Base
{
public:
  Base* Clone() 
  {
    Derived1* ret = new Derived1;
    copy all the data members
  }
};

Java tends to use Clone quite a bit is there more of a C++ way of doing this?

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The optimal way to do this might depend on the bigger picture why and in which situation you are trying to do this... –  sth Feb 28 '11 at 23:18
    
I have a complex tree of different objects, some polymorphic. I want to duplicate the tree using a recursive algorithm. –  doron Feb 28 '11 at 23:25
    
Hope this helps: stackoverflow.com/questions/3831370/…. Follow the links in the sentence mentioned as "this, this and this" –  Nav Mar 1 '11 at 5:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 13 down vote accepted

This is still how we do stuff in C++ for polymorphic classes, but you don't need to do the explicit copy of members if you create a copy constructor (possibly implicit or private) for your objects.

class Base
{
public:
  virtual Base* Clone() = 0;
};

class Derivedn : public Base
{
public:
  //This is OK, its called covariant return type.
  Derivedn* Clone() 
  {
    return new Derivedn(*this);
  }
private:
  Derivedn(const Derivedn) : ... {}
};
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1  
Clone() doesn't have to be abstract. If the subclasses shared common data, there could be a copy constructor for the base class to copy the common parts, and a virtual copy constructor to handle copying the variant parts. Either way it's done, every derived class needs its own cloning method. –  Suncat2000 Feb 28 '11 at 23:41
    
Why use the covariant return type here? Doesn't Base* Derivedn::Clone() { return new Derivedn(*this); } work equally well? –  Robᵩ Mar 1 '11 at 0:19
1  
It does work just as well until you need access to the Derived for some reason - it costs nothing to use covariant return here and may be helpful later. (And I've certainly found it useful when using this kind of pattern) –  Michael Anderson Mar 1 '11 at 0:42
1  
This is alot of biolerplaite code. The Clone function has to be written out for every derived class. is there no way to allocate a new instance of a class that will be specified at run-time? –  Johannes Gerer Jun 8 '11 at 17:20

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