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I have a class which reads a properties file. Please see below. The method readProperties() is called many times when the application is running, does that mean there is a memory issue here?


public class PropertyReader {
    private static Properties   configKeyValuePairs         = null;
    private static String       configPropertiesFileName    = "Config.properties";

    static void readProperties() throws FileNotFoundException, IOException {    
        configKeyValuePairs = new Properties();
        InputStream input = ConfigReader.class
                .getResourceAsStream(configPropertiesFileName);

        configKeyValuePairs.load(input);

        input.close();
    }

   static String getUserName(){
       //return user name which is from the properties file.    
    }
}





share|improve this question
    
To whoever voted to close, maybe you think it is a silly question, but it is a question I don't know. So if you know the answer please put it up here, I will vote for it. –  sarahTheButterFly Feb 28 '11 at 23:25
    
Hard to say, it depends what you do with those Properties instances. In your snippet they are private and there is no way to get them out of your PropertyReader class - in this case calling readProperties() once will hold 1 instance in memory, calling it more times will throw away old instances generating garbage, but not consuming more "live" object space. –  fd. Feb 28 '11 at 23:26
    
@fd, thanks for replying. I forgot to add getters in to the PropertyReader. –  sarahTheButterFly Feb 28 '11 at 23:27
    
Adding getters and setters makes it more difficult to tell; if whoever gets the instances keeps hold of them then they will consume memory in addition to any extra instances that are created later by calling readProperties; and those instances will be out-of-date. If callers always discard the Properties instances shortly after getting them, then there will likely be no more than 1 or 2 instances in memory. Either way, I would think very carefully about the lifecycle of the Properties instances and what they are used for. –  fd. Feb 28 '11 at 23:32
    
Your getter implies that your won't let the Properties object itself be returned to callers, this would mean that there would only ever be 1 live instance, and no memory problems. However, beware thread-safety if it is important to your application; in fact, be sure that you don't call a getter before calling readProperties at least once. –  fd. Feb 28 '11 at 23:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assuming your properties file never changes, you can do the following:

public class MyApplicationConfiguration {
    private static Properties   configKeyValuePairs         = new Properties();
    private static String       configPropertiesFileName    = "Config.properties";

    static {
        InputStream input = null;
        try {
            input = MyApplicationConfiguration.class
                .getResourceAsStream(configPropertiesFileName);

            configKeyValuePairs.load(input);

        } catch (IOException e) {
            // Deal with not being able to load config, could be a fatal error!
        } finally {
            if (input != null) {
                input.close();
            }
        }
    }

    public static String getUsername() {
        // ...
    }

    // Implement getters for other configuration key-value pairs
    // DO NOT let configKeyValuePairs be returned to anyone
}
share|improve this answer
    
Any particular reason for the downvote? Help me improve my answer. :) –  fd. Mar 1 '11 at 1:20
    
Didn't downvote it, but you imho missed the most important part - the getter. If you just return the Properties as is everyone can change the data and everyone will see the changes. If possible you could return a unmodifiable map to counter that - but depends on what you want to do with it afterwards. –  Voo Mar 1 '11 at 1:53
    
@Voo Updated. I did cover that a couple of times in my question comments, but I understand it wasn't clear from my answer that the getters would be for values inside the Properties object, but not the object itself. –  fd. Mar 1 '11 at 8:59

Load the properties object once, and store it a class member.

I find it hard to believe that you will have memory issues because of it.

If you find out that you do, then you can always comeback and rethink it, but don't prematurely optimize a problem that probably doesn't exist.

share|improve this answer
    
like this comment "but don't prematurely optimize a problem that probably doesn't exist." BTW, the properties object was loaded as many times, so that is why I am not sure if there are memory issues. –  sarahTheButterFly Mar 1 '11 at 0:05
    
If you don't run out of memory or use unaccaptable amounts of memory (depending on specification) you don't have memory problems. And if you do, I have a hard time believing that it's a few dozen properties. –  Voo Mar 1 '11 at 1:55

Yes, there could be a very big memory problem, depending on whether or not there are calling classes that hold a reference to the newly created properties object.

Try something like this:

public class PropertyReader {
    private static       Properties   configKeyValuePairs         = null;
    private static final String       configPropertiesFileName    = "Config.properties";


    public static void readProperties() throws FileNotFoundException, IOException { 
        if(null == configKeyValuePairs){
            InputStream input;
            synchronized(PropertyReader.class){
                try{
                    configKeyValuePairs = new Properties();
                    input = PropertyReader.class
                        .getResourceAsStream(configPropertiesFileName);

                    configKeyValuePairs.load(input);
                }finally{
                    //this can still throw ioexception!
                    if(null != input){
                        input.close();
                    }
                }
          }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This isn't the best solution, and it's not synchronized, but it gets you on the right track. –  Kylar Feb 28 '11 at 23:30
    
you should always .close() in a finally block. –  MeBigFatGuy Feb 28 '11 at 23:52
    
Two antipatterns at once (not closing the file correctly and no kind of synchronization). Do not use in production code. –  Voo Mar 1 '11 at 1:56
    
Yeah, not so hot. Editing now. –  Kylar Mar 1 '11 at 17:21

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