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I have a base class, A, which has a method that returns an instance of itself:

class A
{
    protected DateTime P { get; private set; }

    protected A()
    {
        P = DateTime.Now;
    }

    protected A GetOneA()
    {
        return new A();
    }
}

I need to create instance of child class B based on A object.

class B : A
{
    private B(A a)
    {
        //help
    }

    public B GetOneB()
    {
        A a = A.GetOneA();
        return new B(a);
    }
}

Is it possible?

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why do you want to do this? –  Rian Schmits Mar 1 '11 at 0:59
    
Can you give a little more context of why you need to do this? This seems like a bit of an odd patern. –  Justin Mar 1 '11 at 1:00

3 Answers 3

Yes it is possible. First create a "copy" constructor and pass a class instance of A. Inside this constructor you will need to copy all necessary attributes.

class A
{
  protected DateTime P { get; private set; }
  protected A(A copy){
      //copy all properties
      this.P = A.P;
  }
  protected A()
  {
    P = DateTime.Now;
  }

  protected A GetOneA()
  {
    return new A();
  }

}

Then just call the super classes copy constructor.

class B : A
{
  //help
  private B(A a) : base(a)
  {
  }

  public B GetOneB()
  {
    A a = A.GetOneA();
    return new B(a);
  }
}

Let me know if this is not what you are looking for.

Further reading on copy constructors: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173116.aspx

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1  
"super"? This is a C# question =D –  Ed S. Mar 1 '11 at 0:59
    
Sorry brain fart... concept still works. –  Nix Mar 1 '11 at 1:02
    
Yeah, I was just trolling. –  Ed S. Mar 1 '11 at 1:04
    
shouldn't that be: private B(A a): base(a)? –  Rian Schmits Mar 1 '11 at 1:04
1  
fixed your syntax - you can't call the base constructor from code, only with constructor chaining. –  Femaref Mar 1 '11 at 1:04

You made the constructor for A protected. B already contains an A because it is-an A. When the constructor for B is called, it will implicitly call the default constructor for A. What your GetOneB method is doing is calling GetOneA, which allocates an A, followed by allocating a B that is copy-constructed with A a as the parameter.

There's an issue of separation of concerns. There's initialization and there's allocation. If a B is-an A, and As can only be allocated a certain way, then B can not allocate only its A part a certain way and its B part another way. The whole B must be allocated in one manner, but the initialization of it can be done otherwise.

If A must be allocated in a manner different than the rest of B, then you must use containment and create a has-a relationship.

EDIT: We're talking C#, so most of that is irrelevant, because if you're working in C# you're probably not manually managing memory allocation. In any case, you don't need to call GetOneA, because B is-an A and A's constructor is called when B is constructed.

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It is not technically possile no. That is, if I understand your goal to be to set an instance of some class to have an independent "parent" instance. It's just quite logically wrong I suppose.

You'd do better explaning what you want to do. Perhaps you may just like to copy the properties of the object into your own; in that case it's quite straight foward ...

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