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Ie. I want to code a class ADT that can be used like this:

myADT <type> objectA;

in the same way that someone would use a vector like:

vector <type> aVector;

I'm guessing maybe it has something to do with templates and overloading the <> operator, but how do I get it to take a data type as an argument?

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There's no such thing as a <> operator. What are you trying to achieve? –  Etienne de Martel Mar 1 '11 at 1:13
4  
template <class T> class MyContainer { T* storage; /*...*/ };? –  Vlad Mar 1 '11 at 1:15
    
@Vlad looks like that might be what I'm looking for. Don't really understand the syntax though. Could you post that as an answer, in more detail and with an explanation of how it works? –  Matt Munson Mar 1 '11 at 1:24
    
the other guys posted answers already, I cannot add really much. –  Vlad Mar 1 '11 at 1:41
    
@Vlad: Its all good man, thanks. –  Matt Munson Mar 1 '11 at 1:47

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Let's say you have a class that implements your ADT using a hard-coded typedef T:

class ADT
{
  public:
    typedef int T;

    ADT();
    T& operator[](size_t index);
    const T& operator[](size_t index) const;
    size_t size() const;
    ...
  private:
    T* p_;
    size_t size_;
};

(You have to work out the internal storage and member functions that are appropriate for your actual ADT).

To change this so that you can specify T as done for std::vector etc.:

template <typename T>    <-- specification of T moved to here
class ADT
{
  public:
                         <-- typedef for T removed from here
    ADT();
    T& operator[](size_t index);
    const T& operator[](size_t index) const;
    size_t size() const;
    ...
  private:
    T* p_;
    size_t size_;
};

Usage is then:

ADT<int> an_adt_int;
ADT<double> an_adt_double;
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a couple people used <class T> while you and someone else used <typename T>. What's the difference? –  Matt Munson Mar 1 '11 at 1:52
1  
@Matt: there's no difference at all in this context. More generally, typename is also used inside templates to let the compiler know something inside a class/struct parameter is itself a type (i.e. in template <typename T> class X { ... typename T::x ... };), otherwise the compiler can't know what x is until it's actually instantiating the template with a specific type for T. And you must use class to declare a new class (i.e. class X { ... };). –  Tony D Mar 1 '11 at 2:35
1  
@Matt: that said, some few programmers choose class or typename based on what the template parameter needs to be. If it's expected to be a class/struct (e.g. the template will try to use things inside the class, such as member functions, types or variables) then the class keyword's a little extra hint about that. If the template will only be used like any builtin value-semantic type (e.g. int, double), then typename can express this lesser expectation. Note that classes can support value-semantic use - just means sensible operator=, copy constructor... (e.g. std::string). –  Tony D Mar 1 '11 at 2:42
    
@Matt: (as you can see from Mahesh's comment, other programmers have yet other ways of choosing between class and typename...) –  Tony D Mar 1 '11 at 2:46

If ADT is abstract data type then you should use templates

template<class T>
struct myADT
{
    // implementation, for example, two variables of type T.
    T A;
    T B;
};

Using

myADT<int> objectA;

objectA.A = 3;
objectB.B = 4;

myADT<char> C;

C.A = 'A';

I would recommend you to read a book or articles about C++ templates. Google "C++ template".

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Templates help to adapt functionality for a type with out actually repeating code for each type, which is generic programming.

template < class T >
class foo
{
    T number ;
    public:
    foo( T a )
    {
        number = a; // This can be achieved through initializer lists too.
    }
};

In the above snippet, keyword template says that the following is a template. And the type is class, i.e., enclosed in <>. So, foo is a class template whose template parameter is T.

foo<int> obj(10);

The template parameter is of type int. So, the corresponding code is generated by the compiler on template intantiation. i.e.,

class foo
{
    int number ;
    public:
    foo( int a )
    {
        number = a; // This can be achieved through initializer lists too.
    }
};

Had if a different template parameter other than int is supplied, corresponding code would be generated by the compiler on template instantiation. For more info, MSDN Templates Tutorial. Hope it helps.

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can you tell me what is the difference between doing <typename T> and <class T> ? –  Matt Munson Mar 1 '11 at 2:03
    
Usually typename is used for function templates. Both does the same job, but for the sake of clarity between the class and function templates. –  Mahesh Mar 1 '11 at 2:04
    
@Matt Munson- Have a look at the std::vector api (i.e., its member functions prototypes) and that should give you an idea if you are trying to write a container. –  Mahesh Mar 1 '11 at 2:11

I hope it's what you are looking for

template <typename NodeType> class List;
template <typename NodeType>
class Node_List
{
    ...
    private:
      NodeType date;
      Node_List< NodeType > *next_Ptr;    
}

class List
{
   ...
   private:
     Node_List< NodeType > *first_Ptr;
     Node_List< NodeType > *last_Ptr;
 }

Using:

List < int > int_list; List < char > char_list;

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@Matt Munson, there is an answer to the question for Tony... from cplusplus:

The format for declaring function templates with type parameters is:

template <class identifier> function_declaration;
template <typename identifier> function_declaration;

The only difference between both prototypes is the use of either the keyword class or the keyword typename. Its use is indistinct, since both expressions have exactly the same meaning and behave exactly the same way.

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+1 / saw this after I'd commented back, but nice explanation. Cheers. –  Tony D Mar 1 '11 at 2:44

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