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I converted a Subversion repository to Mercurial a few months back and I wound up leaving two meaningless gaps in my revision history. I'm trying to figure out if I can just splice over the gaps, but I haven't been able to get the tools to do precisely what I want.

I had reorganized the Subversion repo twice in the early days of the project: first to convert a single project root to trunk/branches/tags layout, and then to add a second related project in a second root folder with it's own trunk/branches/tags.

By the time I decided to switch to Mercurial there had been no significant development activity outside of the trunk of the first, original project. I was able to use the Mercurial conversion utilities and path mapping to reassemble a single sensible trunk in the new Mercurial repository, or so I thought.

Now I realize that I have two extra heads, each corresponding to where the change history essentially starts over:

r0 ... r16 | (r17) r18 ... r61 | (r62) r63 ... tip

The results of the two revisions after the breaks, r17 and r62, are identical in content to the corresponding revision before the breaks -- they consist entirely of file add operations with exactly the same contents as the previous revisions. Meaningful changes only start at the next revisions (r18 and r63 respectively).

I've messed with the Mercurial Transplant extension in an attempt to splice over r17 and r62, but it winds up concatenating the spliced changesets all the way at the tip of the default branch (r405 at this point).

These extra heads are not really hurting my development activities, so I've let it go for a while. What's pushing me to resolve this is that MercurialEclipse complains about these extra heads every time I pull from my remote repository.

Can anyone offer any advice on how to approach this? Am I just getting the command flags wrong, or am I using the wrong tool? Should I be using the Rebase extension instead? What about some sort of dump-edit dumpfile-reload process that we all used to do with Subversion?

While I've published the project to my development server, there are only a couple of clones out there, so destroying those copies and recloning shouldn't be a big deal.

share|improve this question
1  
I would suggest looking into reposurgeon: esr.ibiblio.org/?p=2718 – Paul Nathan Mar 1 '11 at 2:50
    
Thanks... I'll take a look. – bpanulla Mar 1 '11 at 20:12
    
Rebase might work, worth trying. – tonfa Mar 20 '11 at 23:11
up vote 5 down vote accepted
+50

The extension commands rebase and collapse should do the trick. Consider the following small repository as an example:

$ hg glog -p

o  changeset:   3:bc701d12d956
|  tag:         tip
|  summary:     hack
|
|  diff --git a/file b/file
|  --- a/file
|  +++ b/file
|  @@ -1,1 +1,1 @@
|  -hello world
|  +hello big world
|
o  changeset:   2:2bb8c95d978e
   parent:      -1:000000000000
   summary:     history breaking svn reorganization

   diff --git a/file b/file
   new file mode 100644
   --- /dev/null
   +++ b/file
   @@ -0,0 +1,1 @@
   +hello world

@  changeset:   1:b578b2ec776b
|  summary:     hack
|
|  diff --git a/file b/file
|  --- a/file
|  +++ b/file
|  @@ -1,1 +1,1 @@
|  -hello
|  +hello world
|
o  changeset:   0:c3d20f0b7072
   summary:     initial

   diff --git a/file b/file
   new file mode 100644
   --- /dev/null
   +++ b/file
   @@ -0,0 +1,1 @@
   +hello

It basically resembles your situation, i.e. there are two unrelated lines of history, where the first revision of the second line (r2) is a plain add of everything present at the last revision of the first line (r1).

You can put the second line onto the first one with rebase:

$ hg rebase -s 2 -d 1
$ hg glog

@  changeset:   3:020d1b20caa8
|  summary:     hack
|
o  changeset:   2:2a44eb4b74c3
|  summary:     history breaking svn reorganization (empty changeset now)
|
o  changeset:   1:b578b2ec776b
|  summary:     hack
|
o  changeset:   0:c3d20f0b7072
   summary:     initial

As you see, the two lines have been joined. Revision 2 now is an obsolete empty changeset. You can get rid of it by using the collapse command to combine revisions 1 and 2:

$ hg collapse -r 1:2
<edit commit message>
$ hg glog -p

@  changeset:   2:d283fe96a5e6
|  tag:         tip
|  summary:     hack
|
|  diff --git a/file b/file
|  --- a/file
|  +++ b/file
|  @@ -1,1 +1,1 @@
|  -hello world
|  +hello big world
|
o  changeset:   1:c486d8191bf0
|  summary:     hack
|
|  diff --git a/file b/file
|  --- a/file
|  +++ b/file
|  @@ -1,1 +1,1 @@
|  -hello
|  +hello world
|
o  changeset:   0:c3d20f0b7072
   summary:     initial

   diff --git a/file b/file
   new file mode 100644
   --- /dev/null
   +++ b/file
   @@ -0,0 +1,1 @@
   +hello

Now the unrelated lines of history are joined in a meaningful way.

share|improve this answer
    
When running the rebase command, I get prompted about which versions to keep of certain files, and I'm not sure what the context of this decision is: "local changed src/com/foo/bar/baz.txt which remote deleted use (c)hanged version or (d)elete?" I'm guessing it's working through the succeeding changesets, and at that point I'm not sure how I'm supposed to answer. – bpanulla Mar 22 '11 at 18:20
    
This message should go away if you clean your working copy before rebasing. Run hg update null. The message probably appeared because your working copy was at one of the unwanted head revisions (r16 or r61 in your example) and thus contained files which have been removed in a later revision in one of the subsequent but technically unrelated lines. – Oben Sonne Mar 22 '11 at 19:23
    
I've been working on a clean clone of my project, so that wasn't the issue. It might have something to do with file renames in some of the changesets. I think the merge logic doesn't (can't?) know which one to keep, so it prompts. – bpanulla Mar 22 '11 at 19:45
    
This looks like it's working... thank you for the detailed response! I had tried rebase previously, but the warnings made me think I was doing something wrong. – bpanulla Mar 22 '11 at 19:49
    
Glad I could help. Anyway, by clean working copy I mean an empty one, without any files, that's the hg update null for. In contrast a fresh clone has a working copy which contains the files of the repository tip. – Oben Sonne Mar 22 '11 at 20:02

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