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Let's say I have a namespace like that:

var myNamespace = {
    foo: function() {
    },
    bar: function() {
    }
};

What is the best way to split this code into files defining foo and bar separately?

I'm not worried about loading time - I'll concatenate it back into one file before deployment.

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3  
Vote up for an excellent question! Taught me something good. –  Rutwick Gangurde Jan 15 '13 at 7:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 26 down vote accepted

At the start of each file:

if(myNameSpace === undefined) {
  var myNameSpace = {};
}

File 1:

myNamespace.foo = function()...

File 2:

myNamespace.bar = function()...
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19  
I'm late to the party, but var myNameSpace = myNameSpace || {}; is a little cleaner. –  dmathisen Oct 10 '13 at 15:15
// File1:
// top level namespace here:
var myNamespace = myNamespace || {};

// File2:
myNamespace.foo = function() {
    // some code here...
}
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Simple define in seperate files like this:

File 1:

var myNamspace = {};

File 2:

myNamespace.foo = function()...

File 3:

myNamespace.boo = function()...

Just make sure you load the files in the right order.

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(function (NS) {
    NS.Uber = function Uber() {
        this.super = new NS.Super(); // yes, it works!
    }; //
}(NS = NS || {}));

// ------------- other file -----------------

(function (NS) {
    NS.Super = function Super() {
        this.uber = new NS.Uber(); // yes, it will also work!
    }; //
}(NS = NS || {}));

// -------------- application code ------------

var uber = new NS.Uber();
console.log(uber.super);

var super = new NS.Super();
console.log(super.uber);
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NS = NS || {} means that it sends NS as an argument, and if nonexistent, it assigns an empty object into NS. –  eavichay May 12 at 8:20

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