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I have 2 libraries. Library A is compiled in C. Library B is compiled in C++, but it is mostly C code.

I need to call the following function in library A:

foo* c_func(int64_t (*ptr_to_func)(void));

The first thing this function does is:

if(!ptr_to_func)
  return NULL;

The ptr_to_func needs to point to a function in library B which is declared as:

int64_t bar(void);

I have a cpp file with a main function that calls another function, in there I do the following:

foo* f = c_func(bar);

Then I check if f is null. It is.

What am I doing wrong?

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I don't understand the question. foo is a type, not a variable. The result of c_func(bar) is based on whatever c_func does; you didn't provide its definition. It might work but be returning NULL for some reason. –  Jeremiah Willcock Mar 1 '11 at 3:41
    
@Jeremiah Presumably the OP means that f is checked, rather than foo. –  Jim Balter Mar 1 '11 at 3:48
    
@Jim Yes, that was my intention. Sorry for the confusion. It has been corrected. –  anio Mar 1 '11 at 3:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

What you are doing appears to be correct, with the caveat that your function bar() should be declared within an extern "C" { section.

c_func() is probably returning NULL for a different reason. Step through it in the debugger and see (set a breakpoint at the beginning of c_func()).

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Do I still need the extern if the header file containing the function bar also contains ifdef __cplusplus. –  anio Mar 1 '11 at 3:53
    
@anio: The function itself shouldn't be contained in the header file - only its declaration. If you are compiling that function as C++, then both the declaration and definition should be within extern "C" { }. The #ifdef __cplusplus is used to allow you to compile the same file as C, but you have said that you are compiling that library as C++, so this is probably not relevant. –  caf Mar 1 '11 at 4:21

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