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char fname[256];
printf("Enter file name\n");
scanf("%123s",fname);
strcat(fname,".txt");

FILE *inputf;
inputf=fopen(fname,"w");

if (inputf!=NULL)
    printf("found");
else
    printf("not found");

Mow the problem is that no matter what file name i enter i get a non null pointer.can any one explain why??

share|improve this question
    
What is the question? –  Gorgen Mar 1 '11 at 6:18
    
In what environment do you run this code? Your own computer? A shared terminal, possibly a school pc? Ssh access to somewhere else? If you are running linux, what is the output of "ls -l"? Because it seems you lack the permissions for writing to filesystem. –  junjanes Mar 1 '11 at 6:42
    
You code compiles fine on my system. It creates file if doesn't exit with "w" parameter. You have to check what @junjanes suggested. –  Mahesh Mar 1 '11 at 6:43
    
what if i lack permission?? can i throw an appropriate error message? –  samir rai Mar 1 '11 at 7:00
    
Is this a linux box? If so #include <unistd.h> and query access(fname, W_OK). It returns 0 if file is writable. Different non-zero return values mean different problems. Google "unistd access" for more info. –  junjanes Mar 1 '11 at 8:25

2 Answers 2

fopen(filename,"w") will create a new file. Therefore, if you're entering a legal file name and have proper file system permissions, it should succeed.

If you're trying to open an existing file, use:

fopen(filename, "r")

(Notice the "r" mode, instead of "w".)

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but the new file is not to be found anywhere??? –  samir rai Mar 1 '11 at 6:22
    
@samir - Then the parameter should be "r+". This specifies an already existing file to both read and write. The file must exist. –  Mahesh Mar 1 '11 at 6:27
    
no i mean that if i want to create a completely new text file on the hard disk??? –  samir rai Mar 1 '11 at 6:29
    
"w" creates a new file whether there is an existing one or not. Any existing file by that name is discarded. ...back to your question in your original post: why do you want a NULL pointer? [edited to change "r" to "w"] –  dappawit Mar 1 '11 at 6:33
    
@dappawit - No, for "r" the file must exist. Though the link I give isn't standard, you can check- cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdio/fopen –  Mahesh Mar 1 '11 at 6:36

Not this:

char fname[256]; 
printf("Enter file name\n"); 
scanf("%123s",fname); 
strcat(fname,".txt"); F
FILE *inputf; inputf=fopen(fname,"w");  // <--!!!
if (inputf!=NULL) printf("found"); 
else printf("not found");

but this instead:

char fname[256]; FILE *inputf;

inputf=fopen(fname,"w");
printf("Enter file name\n");

// you know that you can't ever, EVER use scanf( ) so // remove this time bomb and use something else scanf("%123s",fname);

strcat(fname,".txt"); inputf=fopen(fname,"w"); if (inputf!=NULL) { printf("found"); } else { printf("not found"); }

Now, what pointer was not NULL? You could not have compiled the code as you had it, so how do you know what was or was not NULL?

--pete

share|improve this answer
    
inputf should be null if file was not found on the system..so it is not NULL even if i enter an invalid file name. –  samir rai Mar 1 '11 at 6:33
    
and could you tell me better option than scanf?? –  samir rai Mar 1 '11 at 6:33
    
@Pete: I must be missing something. Why shouldn't his original code compile? –  dappawit Mar 1 '11 at 6:36
    
google.com/… –  Pete Wilson Mar 1 '11 at 6:39
    
dappawit, it can't compile because of the attempt to allocate FILE *inputf in the middle of executable code. It has to be at the top, before any code. –  Pete Wilson Mar 1 '11 at 6:42

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