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I seem to be having problems communication the exact meaning of the following lambda expression to a developer with little understanding such expressions (where list is a .Net generic List):

list.Sort((x, y) => x.Name.CompareTo(y.Name));

How would you explain this statement to another developer? What would you tell him?

EDIT: I've since substituted Linq for lambda expression.

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3 Answers 3

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Read the statement as follows and the meaning will be clear -

Sort the list, such that for all x & y in the list, x.Name is compared to y.Name
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I would say the following:

  • It's not LINQ. Sort is a method defined in the List<T> class
  • The (x, y) => x.Name.CompareTo(y.Name) is a lambda expression which is a short-hand style of declading a delegate to an anonymous method. Think of part to the left of => as the method signature, and the part to the right as the method body. The method signature does not need to have the types of the parameters explicitly typed; the compiler figures it out based on the type of the List<T>.
  • Sort will call the method to which the delegate refers repeatedely for pairs of objects in the list in order to determine the sort order
  • In this particular case, it will compare the Name property of the objects.
  • The code will throw a NullReferenceException if there is an x passed to the sort method where Name is null.
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Thanks, I've edited the question to clarify that it is not Linq as such –  Carnotaurus Mar 1 '11 at 6:31

The Sort() method takes a delegate (a method) that accepts two parameters and returns an integer specifying how the first parameter compares to the second. The delegate is created from the lambda expression that has an operator =>, which has the parameters (x,y) on one side and an expression for the return value on the other side.

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Thanks, I've edited the question to clarify that it is not Linq as such –  Carnotaurus Mar 1 '11 at 6:30

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