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I'm looking at quadratic relaxation of maximum independent set problem (p.22 here), and found that FindMaximum fails for every graph I try, unless I give it optimal solution as the starting point. These quadratic programmes have 10-20 variables, so I expect them to be solvable.

  1. Is there a way to make Mathematica solve such quadratic programmes?
  2. Is there some quadratic programming package that's easy to call from within Mathematica?

Here's an example of failing FindMaximum, followed by working FindMaximum initialized at the solution

setupQuadratic[g_Graph] := (
   Ag = AdjacencyMatrix[g];
   A = IdentityMatrix[Length@VertexList@g] - Ag;
   cons = And @@ Table[0 <= x[v] <= 1, {v, VertexList@g}];
   vars = x /@ VertexList[g];
   indSet = FindIndependentVertexSet@g;
   xOpt = Array[Boole[MemberQ[indSet, #]] &, {Length@VertexList@g}];
   );

g = GraphData[{"Cubic", {10, 11}}];
setupQuadratic[g];
FindMaximum[{vars.A.vars, cons}, vars]
FindMaximum[{vars.A.vars, cons}, Thread[{vars, xOpt}]]

Here are other graphs I tried

{"DodecahedralGraph", "FruchtGraph", "TruncatedPrismGraph", \
"TruncatedTetrahedralGraph", {"Cubic", {10, 2}}, {"Cubic", {10, 
   3}}, {"Cubic", {10, 4}}, {"Cubic", {10, 6}}, {"Cubic", {10, 
   7}}, {"Cubic", {10, 11}}, {"Cubic", {10, 12}}, {"Cubic", {12, 
   5}}, {"Cubic", {12, 6}}, {"Cubic", {12, 7}}, {"Cubic", {12, 
   9}}, {"Cubic", {12, 10}}}
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The paper you linked is very nice. Thanks! –  belisarius Mar 1 '11 at 12:19
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3 Answers

It seems that Maximize will serve you better. Here is a modified version of your function, which returns a list of 2 results - the "manual" one and the one obtained by Maximize:

Clear[findIVSet];
findIVSet[g_Graph] :=
Module[{Ag, A, cons, vars, indSet, indSetFromMaximize, xOpt},
  Ag = AdjacencyMatrix[g];
  A = IdentityMatrix[Length@VertexList@g] - Ag;
  cons = And @@ Table[0 <= x[v] <= 1, {v, VertexList@g}];
  vars = x /@ VertexList[g];
  indSet = FindIndependentVertexSet@g;
  xOpt = Array[Boole[MemberQ[indSet, #]] &, {Length@VertexList@g}];
  {indSet, DeleteCases[vars /. (Last@
    Maximize[{vars.A.vars, cons}, vars,Integers] /. (x[i_] -> 1) :> (x[i] -> i)), 0]}];

Here are the results:

In[32]:= graphs = GraphData /@ {"DodecahedralGraph", "FruchtGraph", 
"TruncatedPrismGraph", "TruncatedTetrahedralGraph", {"Cubic", {10, 2}}, {"Cubic", {10, 
  3}}, {"Cubic", {10, 4}}, {"Cubic", {10, 6}}, {"Cubic", {10, 
  7}}, {"Cubic", {10, 11}}, {"Cubic", {10, 12}}, {"Cubic", {12, 
  5}}, {"Cubic", {12, 6}}, {"Cubic", {12, 7}}, {"Cubic", {12, 
  9}}, {"Cubic", {12, 10}}};


In[33]:= sets = findIVSet /@ graphs

Out[33]= {{{1, 2, 3, 8, 10, 11, 17, 20}, {5, 6, 7, 8, 14, 15, 17, 18}},
{{2, 4, 6, 11, 12}, {2, 4, 6, 11, 12}}, {{2, 7, 10, 12, 16, 18}, {8, 11, 13, 16, 17, 18}}, 
{{1, 4, 7, 12}, {4, 7, 9, 12}}, {{2,3, 8, 9}, {2, 3, 8, 9}}, {{1, 4, 7, 10}, {2, 5, 8, 9}}, 
{{1, 4, 7, 10}, {2, 4, 7, 9}}, {{2, 4, 5, 8}, {3, 6, 7, 9}}, {{2, 5, 8, 9}, {2, 5, 8, 9}}, 
{{1, 3, 7, 10}, {4, 5, 8, 9}}, {{1, 6, 8, 9}, {2, 3, 6, 10}}, {{1, 6, 7, 12}, {4, 5, 9, 10}}, 
{{3, 4, 7, 8, 12}, {3, 4, 7, 8, 12}}, {{1, 5, 8, 9}, {4, 5, 10, 11}}, 
{{1, 5, 6, 9, 10}, {3, 4, 7, 8, 12}}, {{3, 4, 7, 9, 10}, {3, 4, 7, 9, 10}}}

They are not always the same for "manual" ones and those from Maximize, but then there is more than one solution for an independent set. The results from Maximize are all independent sets, which is easily verified:

In[34]:= MapThread[IndependentVertexSetQ, {graphs, sets[[All, 2]]}]

Out[34]= {True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, True, 
True, True,True}
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Well, I already have the independent set from FindIndependentVertexSet, which might internally use something like what you propose, I'm actually interested in finding maximum of the original quadratic, Real domain –  Yaroslav Bulatov Mar 1 '11 at 17:48
    
@Yaroslav Why are you interested in the real domain? As far as I could see, it is clearly stated in the paper you linked, that all variables can only have values 0 or 1 (that is, Integer domain). And, for that matter, what makes you think that the results for the real domain will have anything to do with the maximal independent set problem? It seems quite clear that we are not searching for local extrema here, so the constraints are important. Extrema found with continuous constraints can be quite different from those with discrete constraints. Or did I totally miss the point? –  Leonid Shifrin Mar 1 '11 at 18:04
    
Because solving it in Integer domain is NP-complete, whereas real-valued QP programming is tractable. Discarding integer constraints is known as a "relaxation", and it works surprisingly well for certain classes of graphs -- cstheory.stackexchange.com/questions/5170/… –  Yaroslav Bulatov Mar 1 '11 at 18:15
    
@Yaroslav It is tractable but maximizing is nonconvex (minimizing in this case is convex). So no guarantees of globality. –  Daniel Lichtblau Mar 1 '11 at 18:29
    
Interesting, I guess this QP is not as easy as I thought. Apparently such non-convex QP problems are known as "Box-QP" –  Yaroslav Bulatov Mar 1 '11 at 19:37
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Might try method shown in package located here. See problem 8

Daniel Lichtblau Wolfram Research

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interesting, thanks. BTW, I'm also getting good results by using SDP relaxation of the quadratic program -- mathematica-bits.blogspot.com/2011/03/… –  Yaroslav Bulatov Mar 3 '11 at 10:01
    
@Yaroslav Nice bit of work, that Python link and example. –  Daniel Lichtblau Mar 3 '11 at 16:28
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IMO, the reason FindMaximum doesn't work here is the wild nature of your function. I tried a grid with 1,048,576 samples in variable space and none achieve a higher value than zero. Your optimum starting value gets -20.

In[10]:= (x[1]^2 + x[2]^2 + x[3]^2 - 2 x[3] x[4] + x[4]^2 - 
  2 x[2] (x[3] + x[4]) + x[5]^2 - 2 x[3] x[6] - 2 x[5] x[6] + 
  x[6]^2 - 2 x[5] x[7] + x[7]^2 - 2 x[6] x[8] - 2 x[7] x[8] + 
  x[8]^2 - 2 x[7] x[9] + x[9]^2 - 2 x[1] (x[2] + x[5] + x[9]) - 
  2 x[4] x[10] - 2 x[8] x[10] - 2 x[9] x[10] + x[10]^2 /. 
 Thread[vars -> #]) & @@@ Tuples[{0.0, 0.333, 0.667, 1.0}, 10] // Max

Out[10]= 0.

In[11]:= (x[1]^2 + x[2]^2 + x[3]^2 - 2 x[3] x[4] + x[4]^2 - 
 2 x[2] (x[3] + x[4]) + x[5]^2 - 2 x[3] x[6] - 2 x[5] x[6] + 
 x[6]^2 - 2 x[5] x[7] + x[7]^2 - 2 x[6] x[8] - 2 x[7] x[8] + 
 x[8]^2 - 2 x[7] x[9] + x[9]^2 - 2 x[1] (x[2] + x[5] + x[9]) - 
 2 x[4] x[10] - 2 x[8] x[10] - 2 x[9] x[10] + x[10]^2 /. 
Thread[vars -> #]) & @@@ {xOpt}

Out[11]= {-20}
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The objective above simplifies to Times[-20,Power[Slot[1],2]] after ReplaceAll. One way to evaluate original objective is vars.A.vars /. Thread[vars -> xOpt] –  Yaroslav Bulatov Mar 1 '11 at 18:00
    
btw, above can be fixed if you replace @@@ with /@ or # with {##} (but not both at the same time!) –  Yaroslav Bulatov Mar 1 '11 at 18:09
    
I expanded vars.A.vars because it saves a factor of 2.3 in time on my machine. I am aware the 2nd part could have been written differently. I just did it this way to keep the structure of the code the same. –  Sjoerd C. de Vries Mar 1 '11 at 23:40
    
my point is that there's a bug, objective should be 4 at xOpt, not -20 –  Yaroslav Bulatov Mar 2 '11 at 0:59
    
You're right, I was too quick here. –  Sjoerd C. de Vries Mar 2 '11 at 8:58
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