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I have an integer value (ex: 723) and i want to add up all the values in this integer until i get a single value.

ex: 7 + 2 + 3 = 12
    1 + 2     = 3

I'm new to C#. please give me a good explanation of your answer as well :)

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Maybe a better title would be "How to split an integer into digits" –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Mar 1 '11 at 6:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 15 down vote accepted
int i = 723;
int acc;
do {
    acc = 0;
    while (i > 0)
    {
        acc += i % 10;
        i /= 10;
    }
    i = acc;
} while(acc>=10);

% 10 gives the final digit each time, so we add that into an accumulator. /= 10 performs integer division, essentially removing the final digit each time. Then we repeat until we have a small enough number.

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the answer i get (i) is 0 ... how do i display the final answer? –  megazoid Mar 1 '11 at 6:36
    
@megazoid did you refresh? both acc and i should end as 3 –  Marc Gravell Mar 1 '11 at 6:37
    
int i = 723; int acc; do { acc = 0; while (i > 0) { acc += i % 10; i /= 10; } i = acc; } while(acc>=10); int val = i; should this work ?? –  megazoid Mar 1 '11 at 6:43
    
@megazoid - yes; what do you get? I get 3. –  Marc Gravell Mar 1 '11 at 6:47
    
works great !! thanks a lot Marc !!! –  megazoid Mar 1 '11 at 7:10

Though the solutions where you pull out the bottom digit and divide by ten are correct and clearly implement the desired function, you can do this task in far less code if you know a trick. If you sum the digits as you describe until you get a single-digit number, the result you get is the remainder when you divide the original number by nine.

Try it. 789 --> 7 + 8 + 9 = 24 --> 2 + 4 --> 6, and 789 = 87 * 9 + 6

So you can solve your problem by just doing x % 9 if x is a positive integer. If you get zero, then the real result is nine, otherwise you get the repeated sum of the digits.

This trick leads to a way of checking arithmetic called "casting out nines". Suppose you have a sum and you want to check if it is correct:

  3147 
+ 5926
  ----
  9063  

Is that correct? Do your trick on the each line:

  3147 --> 3 + 1 + 4 + 7 = 15 --> 1 + 5 = 6
+ 5926 --> 5 + 9 + 2 + 6 = 22 --> 2 + 2 = 4
  ----
  9063 --> 9 + 0 + 6 + 3 = 18 --> 1 + 8 = 9

Now do the trick on the sum. 6 + 4 = 10 --> 1 + 0 = 1 If you did the original math right then the two checksums should be equal, but they are not, the first is 1 and the second is 9. And sure enough, there is an error in the tens place. The correct sum is

  3147 --> 3 + 1 + 4 + 7 = 15 --> 1 + 5 = 6
+ 5926 --> 5 + 9 + 2 + 6 = 22 --> 2 + 2 = 4
  ----
  9073 --> 9 + 0 + 7 + 3 = 19 --> 1 + 9 = 10 --> 1 + 0 = 1

And now the checksums are the same. 6 + 4 = 10 --> 1 + 0 = 1

It's called "casting out nines" because you can ignore any nines that are in the sum, because they don't make any difference:

9123 --> 9 + 1 + 2 + 3 = 15 --> 1 + 5 = 6, which is the same as just 1 + 2 + 3. You can "cast out" the nine and still get the same result.

Now, can you prove that the sum of the digits is the remainder when dividing by nine? Can you prove that casting out nines works for sums? Can you deduce and prove a similar rule for checking products for errors?

SPOILERS BELOW

Let's define a relation x≡c which means "x and c are non-negative integers and there exists a non-negative integer n such that x = 9n + c". That is, x and c are "congruent mod nine". Got it?

First thing to prove: if x≡c and y≡d then x+y≡c+d.

That's straightforward. By definition of the relation there exist non-negative integers m and n such that x = 9n + c and y = 9m + d. We must show that there exists a non-negative integer p such that x + y = 9p + c + d. That integer p is obviously m + n. Since there exists such an integer, the relation holds.

Second thing to prove: if x≡c and y≡d then xy≡cd.

Again, we must show that there exists an integer p such that xy = 9p + cd. By similar proof of the first theorem, p = 9nm + mc + nd works, so the relation holds.

Third thing to prove: 10n≡1 for any non-negative integer n.

The proof is easy by induction:

  • Clearly 100≡1
  • Clearly 101≡1
  • Make the inductive hypothesis: suppose 10k≡1 where k > 0.
  • 10k+1=10110k
  • 10110k≡(1)(1) by our second proof.
  • Therefore if 10k≡1 then 10k+1≡1
  • Therefore by induction 10n≡1 for all non-negative integers n.

From these three theorems you can now see that

a(102) + b(101) + c(100) ≡ a + b + c

So we have shown that a number in decimal notation is "congruent mod nine" to the sum of its digits.

The fact that "casting out nines" works as an arithmetic checksum now follows immediately from our first proof.

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Let rem(x,y) be the remainder of integer division of x by y. We want to prove that rem(n,9) + rem(m,9) = rem(n+m,9) for all integer n and m. We know that rem(x,y) = x - y*floor(x/y). Using this we get n - 9*floor(n/9) + m - 9*floor(m/9) = n+m - 9*floor((n+m)/9). Subtracting n+m from both sides and multiplying by -1/9 we're left with floor(n/9) + floor(m/9) = floor(n/9+m/9). Using some properties of the floor function we know that floor(n/9+m/9) = floor(n/9) + floor(m/9) or floor(n/9+m/9) = floor(n/9) + floor(m/9) + 1. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 2 '11 at 0:56
    
And now what? I'm so close... but my floor-fu fails me. I have to re-read the first part of TAOCP. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 2 '11 at 0:59
    
@Martinho: It strikes me as simpler to prove this by leveraging how decimal addition is done. E.g, 5+9: The ones place decreases by 1, the tens place increases by one. The tens place might decrease by 9 instead with the hundreds place increasing by 1 (etc.). –  Brian Mar 2 '11 at 15:08
    
@Martinho: rem(n,9) + rem(m,9) = rem(n+m,9) is not true. Try n=m=5. The correct is rem( rem(n,9)+rem(m,9) ,9) = rem(n+m,9). –  ypercube Mar 3 '11 at 20:27
    
But it's easier to prove the generalization: if n=a (mod 9) and m=b (mod 9) then n+m=a+b (mod 9). –  ypercube Mar 3 '11 at 20:27

Use Mod (%) recursively:

int AddUp(int number){
    if(number<10) return number;
    return AddUp(number/10) + number % 10;
}
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did you mean number<10 ? –  Ben Mar 1 '11 at 6:34
    
corrected. Stupid mistake :P –  xandy Mar 1 '11 at 6:34

hmm, a fast function come to my mind is

int number = 723;
double sum = number.ToString().Sum(s => Char.GetNumericValue(s));
string numString = number.ToString();

and for calculating all sums with LINQ use

double [] allSums = Enumerable.Range(1, numString.Length).Select(i =>numString.Substring(0, i).Sum(s => Char.GetNumericValue(s))).ToArray();
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1  
+1 Great use of Linq! –  xandy Mar 1 '11 at 6:33
    
+1. He'll need a while loop, and to terminate when it is only one digit/when the sum is the same as the input in order to do the numerology algorithm he's looking for. But this is a good idea :) –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Mar 1 '11 at 6:37
    
Inefficient because of uncessary ToString()s and Converts. I won't use it even it looks simple. –  Danny Chen Mar 1 '11 at 6:41
    
yes you are correct !!! –  megazoid Mar 1 '11 at 6:41
    
+1 (See those famous Knuth quotes for the reason) –  user166390 Mar 1 '11 at 7:30
int a=723;

if(a % 9 ==0){
   result = 9;
}
else if(a % 9 !=0){
   result = a % 9;
}
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