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using System;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var a = new Derived();
            int x = 123;
            a.Foo(x);
        }
    }

    public class Base
    {
        public virtual void Foo(int x)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Base::Foo");
        }
    }

    public class Derived : Base
    {
        public override void Foo(int x)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Derived::Foo(int x)");
        }

        public void Foo(object o)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Derived::Foo(object o)");
        }
    }
}

Result: "Derived::Foo(object o)"

WHY???

share|improve this question
    
why should it not be called? –  Shamim Hafiz Mar 1 '11 at 7:08
1  
@gunner One would think that Devired.Foo(int) should be called instead of Derived.Foo(object). –  The Scrum Meister Mar 1 '11 at 7:10
    
One might assume that, given a set of function overloads that match a function call, the one which does not involve any casts and most closely matches the parameters would be the one called. However, in this case, it seems that is not the case. –  Sion Sheevok Mar 1 '11 at 8:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 20 down vote accepted

When the compiler tries to find candidate method signatures in preparation for overloading, it looks at the most derived type first, and removes overridden methods looking only at "freshly declared" signatures in that class.

If it finds an applicable method, it doesn't go any further up the inheritance chain to find other signatures. This is counterintuitive (at least counter to my intuition) in this sort of situation. It's designed to avoid the "brittle base class" problem, where changing the base class affects other code in unexpected ways - but when the method is actually overridden in the derived class, I can't see the benefit. (Admittedly ignoring that would mean seemingly-no-op methods which override a method just to call the base implementation weren't nearly as safely-removable as you might expect.)

I have a fairly long article going into overloading in a certain amount of detail about this situation and other corner cases - you may find it useful. See section 7.5.3 of the C# specification for more details.

Bottom line: be careful with overloading, particularly across inheritance boundaries.

share|improve this answer
1  
will it be the same behavior if we write public NEW void Foo(int x) in Derived class? –  Arseny Mar 1 '11 at 7:12
1  
@Arseny: No, because then it's a "new" method signature as far as the compiler is concerned, so it isn't removed from the candidate set. It's not overriding the base method, it's just hiding it. Of course then you get the problem that your code is unclear because of the hiding... –  Jon Skeet Mar 1 '11 at 7:16
    
That's rather disappointing. It's a shame the language doesn't demand that the method with the most fitting parameters be invoked. –  Sion Sheevok Mar 1 '11 at 8:03
    
@Sion: But as I mentioned, that leads to different problems (the brittle base class). Basically there's no perfect solution here. There are tweaks I'd make to change what we actually have, but it's worth being aware of the problem they're trying to avoid. –  Jon Skeet Mar 1 '11 at 8:15

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