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I have a textBox that needs to be "transformed" into a DatePicker under certain circumstances.

easily done with template:

<TextBox.Style>
    <Style TargetType="{x:Type TextBox}">
        <Style.Triggers>
            <Trigger Property="local:MyTextBox.IsDate" Value="True">
                <Setter Property="Template" Value="{StaticResource DateTextBoxTemplate}" />
            </Trigger>
        </Style.Triggers>
    </Style>
</TextBox.Style>

and then:

<ControlTemplate x:Key="DateTextBoxTemplate" TargetType="TextBox">
    <DatePicker x:Name="DateContent"
                Text="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource AncestorType=TextBox}, Path=Text, Mode=TwoWay}" />
</ControlTemplate>

the trouble is: the focus is not "transferred" to the datepicker when I click on it.

i.e: if I click on the control, the datePicker does not get the focus. I have to click on it once again for this to happen.

I know I can do in my code behind:

protected override void OnGotFocus(RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    base.OnGotFocus(e);

    if (IsDate)
    {
        DatePicker dateContent = Template.FindName("DateContent", this) as DatePicker;
        if (dateContent != null) dateContent.Focus();
    }
}

but this does not really satisfy me as I'm pretty sure there is a way to do it all in xaml and I just don't know about it.

I found an other question mentioning the FocusManager.FocusedElement="{Binding ElementName=DateContent}" option, but I have no clue as to where I could put this piece of code: it cannot be added to the controlTemplate (as I suspected), and if I put it on a grid encapsulating the datePicker in the template, it is basically useless.

so can I do this in xaml only? and if yes, how?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I've used this in the past and it has worked

<ControlTemplate x:Key="DateTextBoxTemplate" TargetType="TextBox">
    <DatePicker x:Name="DateContent" Text="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource AncestorType=TextBox}, Path=Text, Mode=TwoWay}"/>
    <ControlTemplate.Triggers>
        <Trigger Property="IsFocused" Value="True">
            <Setter TargetName="DateContent"
                    Property="FocusManager.FocusedElement"
                    Value="{Binding ElementName=DateContent}" />
        </Trigger>
    </ControlTemplate.Triggers>
</ControlTemplate>
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, this is the kind of thing I was looking for. This did not work as is, but with a little tweak I was able to have it behave as wanted: the trigger looks like this in the end: <Trigger Property="IsFocused" Value="True"> (you can edit your answer for future reference) –  David Mar 1 '11 at 10:15
    
@David: Updated my answer with your addition –  Fredrik Hedblad Mar 1 '11 at 10:23
    
perfect, works a treat. I wonder why the TargetName="DateContent" is needed though, since setting the FocusManager.FocusedElement attached property's value directly on the templated object should not make any difference. But I tried removing it and it breaks the behaviour, so I guess it's necessary in a way I can't understand. –  David Mar 1 '11 at 14:16

You can achieve the desired behavior by telling the DatePicker that it should be focused by default when loaded. To do this you can create an Attached Behavior like this:

public static class FocusExtensions
{
    public static bool GetIsDefaultFocusElement(DependencyObject obj) 
    {
        return (bool)obj.GetValue(IsDefaultFocusElementProperty);
    }

    public static void SetIsDefaultFocusElement(DependencyObject obj, bool value) 
    {
        obj.SetValue(IsDefaultFocusElementProperty, value);
    }

    public static readonly DependencyProperty IsDefaultFocusElementProperty =
        DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached("IsDefaultFocusElement", typeof(bool), typeof(FocusExtensions), new UIPropertyMetadata(false, OnIsDefaultFocusElementChanged));

    private static void OnIsDefaultFocusElementChanged(DependencyObject d, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e) 
    {
        var fe = (FrameworkElement)d;

        if (!(bool)e.NewValue) 
        {
            return;
        }

        if (fe.IsLoaded) 
        {
            SetFocus(fe);
        }
        else 
        {
            fe.Loaded += OnDefaultFocusElementLoaded;
        }
    }

    private static void OnDefaultFocusElementLoaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) 
    {
        var fe = (FrameworkElement) sender;

        fe.Loaded -= OnDefaultFocusElementLoaded;

        SetFocus(fe);
    }

    private static void SetFocus(FrameworkElement element) 
    {
        element.Focus();
    }
}

Then you can set the IsDefaultFocusElement attached property on the DatePicker and every time the DatePicker is loaded it will receive focus:

<ControlTemplate x:Key="DateTextBoxTemplate" TargetType="TextBox">
    <DatePicker x:Name="DateContent"
                Text="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource AncestorType=TextBox}, Path=Text, Mode=TwoWay}"
                my:FocusExtensions.IsDefaultFocusElement="True" />
</ControlTemplate>

This behavior can be used in any other places in your application where you need to specify an element that has to be focused by default (e.g. when you open a dialog and you want the first field to be focused right away).

share|improve this answer
    
hmm, thanks, but this is slightly overkill for my case. It is indeed better than the OnGotFocus override as it preserve the MVVM pattern, but I prefer the simpler solution explain by meleak in this case. –  David Mar 1 '11 at 10:10
    
@David - if you are not planning to extend your application and you are sure that you will not need to set default focus anywhere anymore, then, yes, the solution provided my @Meleak is definitely simpler. –  Pavlo Glazkov Mar 1 '11 at 10:15
    
yes, this really is for just this case and I don't need to overdo it, so I'll stick with simple. But I'll keep your suggestion in mind for future reference as it definitely has some good ideas in it –  David Mar 1 '11 at 10:18

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