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Recently I've been thinking about securing some of my code. I'm curious how one could make sure an object can never be created directly, but only via some method of a factory class. Let us say I have some "business object" class and I want to make sure any instance of this class will have a valid internal state. In order to achieve this I will need to perform some check before creating an object, probably in its constructor. This is all okay until I decide I want to make this check be a part of the business logic. So, how can I arrange for a business object to be creatable only through some method in my business logic class but never directly? The first natural desire to use a good old "friend" keyword of C++ will fall short with C#. So we need other options...

Let's try some example:

public MyBusinessObjectClass
{
    public string MyProperty { get; private set; }

    public MyBoClass (string myProperty)
    {
        MyProperty = myProperty;
    }
}

public MyBusinessLogicClass
{
    public MyBusinessObjectClass CreateBusinessObject (string myProperty)
    {
        // Perform some check on myProperty

        if (true /* check is okay */)
            return new MyBusinessObjectClass (myProperty);

        return null;
    }
}

It's all okay until you remember you can still create MyBusinessObjectClass instance directly, without checking the input. I would like to exclude that technical possibility altogether.

So, what does the community think about this?

share|improve this question
    
is MyBoClass method misspelt? –  pradeeptp Feb 5 '09 at 11:17

13 Answers 13

up vote 33 down vote accepted

Looks like you just want to run some business logic before creating the object - so why dont you just create a static method inside the "BusinessClass" that does all the dirty "myProperty" checking work, and make the constructor private?

public BusinessClass
{
    public string MyProperty { get; private set; }

    private BusinessClass()
    {
    }

    private BusinessClass(string myProperty)
    {
        MyProperty = myProperty;
    }

    public static BusinessClass CreateObject(string myProperty)
    {
        // Perform some check on myProperty

        if (/* all ok */)
            return new BusinessClass(myProperty);

        return null;
    }
}

Calling it would be pretty straightforward:

BusinessClass objBusiness = BusinessClass.CreateObject(someProperty);
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4  
Ah, you could also throw an exception instead of returning null. –  Ricardo Nolde Nov 30 '10 at 15:03

You can make the constructor private, and the factory a nested type:

public class BusinessObject
{
    private BusinessObject(string property)
    {
    }

    public class Factory
    {
        public static BusinessObject CreateBusinessObject(string property)
        {
            return new BusinessObject(property);
        }
    }
}

This works because nested types have access to the private members of their enclosing types. I know it's a bit restrictive, but hopefully it'll help...

share|improve this answer
    
I thought about that but it effectively moves these checks into the business object itself, which I'm trying to avoid. –  User Feb 5 '09 at 10:58
    
@so-tester: You can still have the checks in the factory rather than the BusinessObject type. –  Jon Skeet Feb 5 '09 at 11:02
1  
@JonSkeet I know this question is really old, but I'm curious as to what the advantage is to putting the CreateBusinessObject method inside of a nested Factory class instead of having that static method be a method directly of the BusinessObject class... can you recall your motivation for doing so? –  Kiley Naro Sep 29 '11 at 3:03
    
@KileyNaro: Well, that's what the question was asking for :) It doesn't necessarily confer many advantages, but it answers the question... there can be times when this is useful though - the builder pattern springs to mind. (In that case the builder would be the nested class, and it would have an instance method called Build.) –  Jon Skeet Sep 29 '11 at 5:29

Or, if you want to go really fancy, invert control: Have the class return the factory, and instrument the factory with a delegate that can create the class.

public class BusinessObject
{
  public static BusinessObjectFactory GetFactory()
  {
    return new BusinessObjectFactory (p => new BusinessObject (p));
  }

  private BusinessObject(string property)
  {
  }
}

public class BusinessObjectFactory
{
  private Func<string, BusinessObject> _ctorCaller;

  public BusinessObjectFactory (Func<string, BusinessObject> ctorCaller)
  {
    _ctorCaller = ctorCaller;
  }

  public BusinessObject CreateBusinessObject(string myProperty)
  {
    if (...)
      return _ctorCaller (myProperty);
    else
      return null;
  }
}

:)

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, that one is good. I like it. But it's a really unusual one. –  User Feb 5 '09 at 11:01
    
Very nice piece of code. Object creation logic is in a separate class and object can be created only using the factory. –  Nikolai Samteladze Oct 24 '13 at 15:57

You could make the constructor on your MyBusinessObjectClass class internal, and move it and the factory into their own assembly. Now only the factory should be able to construct an instance of the class.

share|improve this answer

Apart from what Jon suggested, you could also either have the factory method (including the check) be a static method of BusinessObject in the first place. Then, have the constructor private, and everyone else will be forced to use the static method.

public class BusinessObject
{
  public static Create (string myProperty)
  {
    if (...)
      return new BusinessObject (myProperty);
    else
      return null;
  }
}

But the real question is - why do you have this requirement? Is it acceptable to move the factory or the factory method into the class?

share|improve this answer
    
This is hardly a requirement. I just want to have a clean separation of business object and logic. Just as it is inappropriate to have these checks in pages' code-behind, I deem it inappropriate to have these checks in objects themselves. Well, maybe basic validation, but not really business rules. –  User Feb 5 '09 at 10:57
    
If you want to separate the logic and the structure of a class only for reviewing convenience, you could always use a partial class and have both in separate files... –  Grx70 May 12 '13 at 9:03

Yet another (lightweight) option is to make a static factory method in the BusinessObject class and keep the constructor private.

public class BusinessObject
{
	public static BusinessObject NewBusinessObject(string property)
	{
		return new BusinessObject();
	}

	private BusinessObject()
	{
	}
}
share|improve this answer

In a case of good separation between interfaces and implementations the
protected-constructor-public-initializer pattern allows a very neat solution.

Given a business object:

public interface IBusinessObject { }

class BusinessObject : IBusinessObject
{
    public static IBusinessObject New() 
    {
        return new BusinessObject();
    }

    protected BusinessObject() 
    { ... }
}

and a business factory:

public interface IBusinessFactory { }

class BusinessFactory : IBusinessFactory
{
    public static IBusinessFactory New() 
    {
        return new BusinessFactory();
    }

    protected BusinessFactory() 
    { ... }
}

the following change to BusinessObject.New() initializer gives the solution:

class BusinessObject : IBusinessObject
{
    public static IBusinessObject New(BusinessFactory factory) 
    { ... }

    ...
}

Here a reference to concrete business factory is needed to call the BusinessObject.New() initializer. But the only one who has the required reference is business factory itself.

We got what we wanted: the only one who can create BusinessObject is BusinessFactory.

share|improve this answer
    
So you make sure the only working public constructor of the object requires a Factory, and that needed Factory parameter can only be instantiated by calling the Factory's static method? Seems like a working solution, but I get the feeling that snippets like public static IBusinessObject New(BusinessFactory factory) will raise many eyebrows if someone else maintains the code though. –  Flater Jan 22 at 9:27
    
@Flater Agreed. I would change the parameter name factory into asFriend. In my code base it would show then as public static IBusinessObject New(BusinessFactory asFriend) –  Reuven Bass Jan 26 at 8:14

So, it looks like what I want cannot be done in a "pure" way. It's always some kind of "call back" to the logic class.

Maybe I could do it in a simple way, just make a contructor method in the object class first call the logic class to check the input?

public MyBusinessObjectClass
{
    public string MyProperty { get; private set; }

    private MyBusinessObjectClass (string myProperty)
    {
        MyProperty  = myProperty;
    }

    pubilc static MyBusinessObjectClass CreateInstance (string myProperty)
    {
        if (MyBusinessLogicClass.ValidateBusinessObject (myProperty)) return new MyBusinessObjectClass (myProperty);

        return null;
    }
}

public MyBusinessLogicClass
{
    public static bool ValidateBusinessObject (string myProperty)
    {
        // Perform some check on myProperty

        return CheckResult;
    }
}

This way, the business object is not creatable directly and the public check method in business logic will do no harm either.

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I don't understand why you want to separate the "business logic" from the "business object". This sounds like a distortion of object orientation, and you'll end up tying yourself in knots by taking that approach.

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I don't understand this distinction either. Can someone explain why this is being done, and what code would be in the business object? –  pipTheGeek Feb 5 '09 at 12:27
    
It's just one approach that could be used. I want business object to be mainly data structures but not with all the field open for read/write. But the question really was about being able to instantiate an object only with the help of a factory method and not directly. –  User Feb 5 '09 at 12:33
    
@Jim: I personally agree with your point, but professionally, this is done constantly. My current project is a webservice that takes a HTML string, cleans it up according to some preset rules, then returns the cleaned up string. I am required to go through 7 layers of my own code "because all our projects must be built from the same project template". It stands to reason that most people asking these questions on SO don't get the freedom to change the entire flow of their code. –  Flater Jan 22 at 9:23

I'd put the factory in the same assembly as the domain class, and mark the domain class's constructor internal. This way any class in your domain may be able to create an instance, but you trust yourself not to, right? Anyone writing code outside of the domain layer will have to use your factory.

public class Person
{
  internal Person()
  {
  }
}

public class PersonFactory
{
  public Person Create()
  {
    return new Person();
  }  
}

However, I must question your approach :-)

I think that if you want your Person class to be valid upon creation you must put the code in the constructor.

public class Person
{
  public Person(string firstName, string lastName)
  {
    FirstName = firstName;
    LastName = lastName;
    Validate();
  }
}
share|improve this answer

I don't think there is a solution that's not worse than the problem , all he above require a public static factory which IMHO is a worse problem and wont stop people just calling the factory to use your object - it doesnt hide anything . Best to expose an interface and/or keep the constructor as internal if you can that's the best protection since the assembly is trusted code.

One option is to have a static constructor which registers a factory somewhere with something like an IOC container.

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This solution is based off munificents idea of using a token in the constructor. Done in this answer make sure object only created by factory (C#)

  public class BusinessObject
    {
        public BusinessObject(object instantiator)
        {
            if (instantiator.GetType() != typeof(Factory))
                throw new ArgumentException("Instantiator class must be Factory");
        }

    }

    public class Factory
    {
        public BusinessObject CreateBusinessObject()
        {
            return new BusinessObject(this);
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

Here is another solution in the vein of "just because you can doesn't mean you should" ...

It does meet the requirements of keeping the business object constructor private and putting the factory logic in another class. After that it gets a bit sketchy.

The factory class has a static method for creating business objects. It derives from the business object class in order to access a static protected construction method that invokes the private constructor.

The factory is abstract so you can't actually create an instance of it (because it would also be a business object, so that would be weird), and it has a private constructor so client code can't derive from it.

What's not prevented is client code also deriving from the business object class and calling the protected (but unvalidated) static construction method. Or worse, calling the protected default constructor we had to add to get the factory class to compile in the first place. (Which incidentally is likely to be a problem with any pattern that separates the factory class from the business object class.)

I'm not trying to suggest anyone in their right mind should do something like this, but it was an interesting exercise. FWIW, my preferred solution would be to use an internal constructor and the assembly boundary as the guard.

using System;

public class MyBusinessObjectClass
{
    public string MyProperty { get; private set; }

    private MyBusinessObjectClass(string myProperty)
    {
        MyProperty = myProperty;
    }

    // Need accesible default constructor, or else MyBusinessObjectFactory declaration will generate:
    // error CS0122: 'MyBusinessObjectClass.MyBusinessObjectClass(string)' is inaccessible due to its protection level
    protected MyBusinessObjectClass()
    {
    }

    protected static MyBusinessObjectClass Construct(string myProperty)
    {
        return new MyBusinessObjectClass(myProperty);
    }
}

public abstract class MyBusinessObjectFactory : MyBusinessObjectClass
{
    public static MyBusinessObjectClass CreateBusinessObject(string myProperty)
    {
        // Perform some check on myProperty

        if (true /* check is okay */)
            return Construct(myProperty);

        return null;
    }

    private MyBusinessObjectFactory()
    {
    }
}
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