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#include <functional>

int func(int x, int y)
{
    return x+y;
}

int main()
{
    typedef std::function<int(int, int)> Funcp;
    Funcp funcp = func;

    return 0;
}

But is it possible to point to a template function?

#include <functional>

template<class T>
T func(T x, T y)
{
    return x+y;
}

int main()
{
    typedef std::function<?(?, ?)> Funcp;
    Funcp funcp = func;

    return 0;
}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

No. A template function is exactly that, a template. It's not a real function. You can point a std::function to a specific instantiation of the template function, e.g. func<int,int>

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3  
+1. Really, the term "template function" is misleading, "function template" is more accurate. –  suszterpatt Mar 1 '11 at 10:27

There is no such thing as a template function in C++ — what people casually mention as "template functions" are actually function templates : templates which define functions.

As such, func in your second example above is not a function, it's a (function) template, and it cannot be used in the same way as a function can. In particular, std::function expects to be provided with a function.

How you can work around this depends on what you are trying to achieve. If you're trying to make the code that uses the function work with any type, you can simply place that code in a function or class template:

template <typename T>
void use_function(T t) {
  typedef std::function<T(T,T)> Funcp = func<T>;
  // use Funcp here
}

What you will not be able to do, however, is use late binding with universal type quantifiers ("can be applied to any type"), because "can be applied to any type" is necessarily resolved at compile-time in C++. That's just how it rolls.

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Is this what you want?

#include <functional>

template<class T>
T func(T x, T y)
{
    return x+y;
}

template<typename T> struct FunctionType
{
    typedef std::function<T(T, T)> Type ;
} ;

int main()
{
    FunctionType<int>::Type Funcp = func<int> ;
}
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As Erik points out, this is not possible directly. To achieve the effect you probably desire, you would have to make the code that uses the pointer a template.

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It is not possible to do this because std::function is not "polymorphic", it can only have a given return type and a given set of argument types). If you need to pass a generic function to an algorithm, you might do this:

 class func_functor {
    template<class T>
    T operator()(T x, T y) const
    {
       return func(x,y);
    }
 };

and pass an instance of it to the algorithm.

The difference with using std::function is that the function call is resolved statically at compile time and not at runtime.

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Just to make things clear: using func_functor means the function call is resolved at compile time. –  Victor Nicollet Mar 1 '11 at 12:42

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