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class One {
Two two() {
    return new Two() {
        Two(){}
        Two(String s) {
            System.out.println("s= "+s);
        }
    };
    }
}

class Ajay {
    public static void main(String ...strings ){
        One one=new One();
        System.out.println(one.two());
    }
}

The above sample code cannot be compiled.It says "Two cannot be resolved". What is the problem in this code??

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Is there any problem with the code?? –  Ajay Singh Mar 1 '11 at 10:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted
new Two() {
    Two(){}
    Two(String s) {
        System.out.println("s= "+s);
    }
};

An anonymous inner class is called anonymous because it doesn't have its own name and has to be referred to by the name of the base-class or interface it extends/implements.

In your example you create an anonymous subclass of Two so Two has to be declared somewhere either as a class or interface. If the class Two is already declared you either don't have it on your classpath or forgot to import it.

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Thanx.I forgot to declare the class Two.infact i did not know that the class Two should be declared because the book iam refering doesn't mention this.. –  Ajay Singh Mar 1 '11 at 11:45

you are creating

new Two() so there must be a valid class in classpath.

make it

class Two{

}

class One {
Two two() {
    return new Two() {
//        Two(){}
//        Two(String s) {
//            System.out.println("s= "+s);
//        }//you can't override constuctors
    };
    }
}

or on left side of new there must be super class or interface to make it working

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@jigar...no he is using next-generation-dynamic-class-generation which automatically creates any class that is not in the classpath and also creates sensible methods for it;) –  Suraj Chandran Mar 1 '11 at 10:32
    
Since`Two` is actually being implemented as an anonymous inner class, it might make more sense to declare it as an interface or abstract class rather than a class. –  MAK Mar 1 '11 at 10:38
    
@MAK being implemented as an anonymous inner class for the shown code only –  Jigar Joshi Mar 1 '11 at 10:41

You didn't declare the Two class. You declared class One and private member two, where two is object of Two class which you tried to initialize by anonymous construction.

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two is not declared private –  Alpine Mar 1 '11 at 11:12
    
Two(){} is the constructor where as Two two(){} is a method of class One. –  Alpine Mar 1 '11 at 11:15
    
Yes, you right. I interpreted your code incorrectly. Sorry. –  Nikolay Antipov Mar 1 '11 at 11:54

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