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I've been playing around with generics and I've been seeing some weird stuff. I hope you guys have an explanation! To make everything easier I've put the "problem" into an example:

namespace Lab
{
    public class Animal
    {
        public Animal(string sound)
        {
            this.Sound = sound;
        }

        public string Sound { get; private set; }

        public void Kick()
        {
            Printer.Print(this, Sound);
        }
    }

    public class Dog : Animal
    {
        public Dog() : base("Bark, bark! I'll bite you!") { }
    }

    public class Printer
    {
        public static void Print<T>(T obj, string message)
        {
            System.Console.WriteLine("{0} says '{1}' \n", typeof(T).FullName.PadRight(10), message);
        }
    }

    public static class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Animal bird = new Animal("Tweet!");
            Dog dog = new Dog();

            System.Console.WriteLine("Kick bird:");
            bird.Kick();
            System.Console.WriteLine("Kick dog:");
            dog.Kick();
            System.Console.WriteLine("Print kick dog:");
            Printer.Print(dog, dog.Sound);

            System.Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}

So, I have two animals in my Lab: a dog and a bird. When I "kick" those animals they'll make a sound. The printer will print the sound and the type of animal. When I run the program it prints:

Kick bird: Lab.Animal says 'Tweet!'

Kick dog: Lab.Animal says 'Bark, bark! I'll bite you!'

Print kick dog: Lab.Dog says 'Bark, bark! I'll bite you!'

Why does the first kick of the dog tell me it is of the type Lab.Animal? And... how can I get it to return Lab.Dog?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The first kick of the dog tells you that the compile-time type of the type argument was Lab.Animal. In other words, your Animal.Kick method is effectively:

Printer.Print<Animal>(this, Sound);

Type arguments aren't determined polymorphically - they're determined at compile-time. It becomes more complicated when the type argument of one call is actually the type parameter of the calling context, but it's fundamentally the same kind of thing.

To make it say Lab.Dog, you'd have to get the actual execution-time type of the object, e.g. using

obj.GetType().FullName
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My problem with GetType() is that it is pretty expensive compared to typeof(). But that is besides the point of the example. Thanks for the explanation! –  Kees C. Bakker Mar 1 '11 at 22:52
    
@Kees: It's "expensive" precisely because it's doing something at execution time instead of at compile-time, effectively - but you use what you need :) (Is it really that expensive though?) –  Jon Skeet Mar 1 '11 at 22:53
    
Yeah, I was hoping the generic would give me the right type. I'm using it in my script-compiler. Basically I only need the full name of the runtime type to check if the script has already been compiled and present. GetType() provides a little bit more than the name :-). –  Kees C. Bakker Mar 1 '11 at 23:00

Normally, generics are determined at compile time, but they are also a runtime feature. In this case you are using generic type inference, which uses the variables etc to infer type.

In the method:

    public void Kick()
    {
        Printer.Print(this, Sound);
    } 

all that is known of this in this context is that it must be Animal so there is an implicit Anmial, i.e. Printer.Print<Animal>(this, Sound)

Other options:

  • use GetType() to find the actual type of the object
  • use dynamic to defer resolution to runtime (note; not an ideal use of dynamic, but it works)
share|improve this answer
    
How are generics a runtime feature? –  Kees C. Bakker Mar 1 '11 at 22:53
1  
@Kees in .Net, they are; they are very unlike c++ templates, for example. In fact, you can declare a type completely at runtime, then create a List<T> of that at runtime; Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(List<>).MakeGenericType(someType)) etc. This is also why you can use generics from libraries without needing source or headers - it is the runtime that supports generics. –  Marc Gravell Mar 1 '11 at 23:13

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