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I am trying to set the value of the output parameter thirdPartyId, but I am getting an error saying missing or invalid option at the set thirdPartyId statement.

PROCEDURE usp_insert_user(  userType VARCHAR2,
                                logonId VARCHAR2,
                                title VARCHAR2,
                                firstName VARCHAR2,
                                middleName VARCHAR2,
                                lastName VARCHAR2,
                                comments VARCHAR2,
                                thirdPartyId OUT number) AS
      begin
        set thirdPartyId := select max(third_party_id) + 1 from third_party_user_temp;
        insert into THIRD_PARTY_USER_TEMP
            (Third_party_id,web_logon_id,prsn_type_cd,prsn_title_nm,
            prsn_first_nm,prsn_mdl_nm,prsn_last_nm,addtnl_third_party_txt)
            VALUES(thirdPartyId,logonId,upper(userType),title,
            firstName,middleName,lastName,comments)
        ;
    end usp_insert_user;

What is the right way to do this?

Thanks!

Update: Is this any safer?

insert into THIRD_PARTY_USER_TEMP
        (Third_party_id,web_logon_id,prsn_type_cd,prsn_title_nm,
        prsn_first_nm,prsn_mdl_nm,prsn_last_nm,addtnl_third_party_txt)
        VALUES((select max(third_party_id) + 1 from third_party_user_temp),logonId,upper(userType),title,
        firstName,middleName,lastName,comments)
        returning third_party_id into thirdPartyId
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can do this:

select max(third_party_id) + 1 into thirdPartyId from third_party_user_temp;

This may be subject to contention problems if two people can run this at the same time - both could end up with the same new thirdPartyId. You can look at sequences to avoid this.


If you define a sequence called, say, thirdPartyIdSeq, you can do this:

PROCEDURE usp_insert_user(  userType VARCHAR2,
                                logonId VARCHAR2,
                                title VARCHAR2,
                                firstName VARCHAR2,
                                middleName VARCHAR2,
                                lastName VARCHAR2,
                                comments VARCHAR2,
                                thirdPartyId OUT number) AS
      begin
        insert into THIRD_PARTY_USER_TEMP
            (Third_party_id,web_logon_id,prsn_type_cd,prsn_title_nm,
            prsn_first_nm,prsn_mdl_nm,prsn_last_nm,addtnl_third_party_txt)
            VALUES(third_party_id_seq.nextval,logonId,upper(userType),title,
            firstName,middleName,lastName,comments)
        returning third_party_id into thirdPartyId;
    end usp_insert_user;

This uses the sequence to generate the next ID, and the returning clause populates your OUT parameter.

You can also avoid the procedure and do the ID generation in a trigger, again using the sequence. There are a lot of examples of this approach around, not least on this site.

CREATE OR REPLACE TRIGGER third_party_user_temp_bi
BEFORE INSERT ON third_party_user_temp
FOR EACH ROW
BEGIN
    SELECT thirdPartyIdSeq.NEXTVAL
    INTO   :new.third_party_id
    FROM   dual;
END;
/

Your insert then doesn't need to specify the ID to be used.

share|improve this answer
    
is there a way that I can lock the table at the beginning of the stored proc and unlock it at the end to avoid this? I think even if I used a indentity of some sort for the id I would have to return the new ID and I could run into the same issue, where if two people inserted a record and then it returned the id for both they would get the same id... –  kralco626 Mar 1 '11 at 12:18
    
Explicit locking probably isn't something you want to dive into. Sequences are the way to go with this. –  Alex Poole Mar 1 '11 at 12:20
    
sequences are oracles version of identities? –  kralco626 Mar 1 '11 at 12:21
    
As far as I understand what you mean by identities, then sort of. Oracle doesn't have auto-incrementing IDs for column values built in. A sequence is a counter that increments and won't return the same value to two sessions, so it can be used to generate the equivalent of an auto-incrementing ID, but requires a bit of code (usually in a trigger) to assign the next value to a column. –  Alex Poole Mar 1 '11 at 12:30
    
Oracle makes me sad :(. Anyways, I'm updating my question. is the new way any safer? –  kralco626 Mar 1 '11 at 12:34

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