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Imagine a situation, I have PC with two lan cards, one is connected to internet another is connected to local network, how can I detect IP which is connected to internet with C# ?

share|improve this question
    
Worth remembering that you could have multiple connections as well. – Rowland Shaw Feb 5 '09 at 12:41
    
Yeah, but I need just one, the main one. :) – Lukas Šalkauskas Feb 5 '09 at 13:16
4  
You probably mean any one, since nothing defines the "main" one, except being the first in the route table. Even then, the OS can (does) choose to balance bandwidth utilization by using the second interface. – Hosam Aly Feb 5 '09 at 14:32

15 Answers 15

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Try this:

static IPAddress getInternetIPAddress()
{
    try
    {
        IPAddress[] addresses = Dns.GetHostAddresses(Dns.GetHostName());
        IPAddress gateway = IPAddress.Parse(getInternetGateway());
        return findMatch(addresses, gateway);
    }
    catch (FormatException e) { return null; }
}

static string getInternetGateway()
{
    using (Process tracert = new Process())
    {
        ProcessStartInfo startInfo = tracert.StartInfo;
        startInfo.FileName = "tracert.exe";
        startInfo.Arguments = "-h 1 208.77.188.166"; // www.example.com
        startInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
        startInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
        tracert.Start();

        using (StreamReader reader = tracert.StandardOutput)
        {
            string line = "";
            for (int i = 0; i < 9; ++i)
                line = reader.ReadLine();
            line = line.Trim();
            return line.Substring(line.LastIndexOf(' ') + 1);
        }
    }
}

static IPAddress findMatch(IPAddress[] addresses, IPAddress gateway)
{
    byte[] gatewayBytes = gateway.GetAddressBytes();
    foreach (IPAddress ip in addresses)
    {
        byte[] ipBytes = ip.GetAddressBytes();
        if (ipBytes[0] == gatewayBytes[0]
            && ipBytes[1] == gatewayBytes[1]
            && ipBytes[2] == gatewayBytes[2])
        {
            return ip;
        }
    }
    return null;
}

Note that this implementation of findMatch() relies on class C matching. If you want to support class B matching, just omit the check for ipBytes[2] == gatewayBytes[2].

Edit History:

  • Updated to use www.example.com.
  • Updated to include getInternetIPAddress(), to show how to use the other methods.
  • Updated to catch FormatException if getInternetGateway() failed to parse the gateway IP. (This can happen if the gateway router is configured such that it doesn't respond to traceroute requests.)
  • Cited Brian Rasmussen's comment.
  • Updated to use the IP for www.example.com, so that it works even when the DNS server is down.
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 ugly, but works. – Tamas Czinege Feb 5 '09 at 12:39
    
This depends on the resolution of www.example.com. If it resolves to a local host (e.g. from etc/hosts), the code above will not work as expected. – Brian Rasmussen Feb 5 '09 at 14:46
    
@Brian, thanks for the note. I have no idea why anyone would do that, but it's a valid point. – Hosam Aly Feb 5 '09 at 14:49
    
Thanks Hosam. I took the freedom to use your answer in this thread: stackoverflow.com/questions/19591675/…. Including the mentioning of you being the author. – Serv Oct 25 '13 at 17:49
    
@Serv Thanks for telling me. But you replaced example.com's IP with its domain, missing the point of the last note in my answer. – Hosam Aly Oct 26 '13 at 20:19

The internet connection must be on the same IP network as the default gateway.

There's really foolproof no way to tell from the IP address if you can reach the "internet" or not. Basically you can communicate with your own IP network. Everything else has to go through a gateway. So if you can't see the gateway, you're confined to the local IP network.

The gateway, however, depends on other gateways, so even if you can access the gateway, you may not be able to reach some other network. This can be due to e.g. filtering or lack of routes to the desired networks.

Actually, it makes little sense to talk about the internet in this sense, as you will probably never be able to reach the entire internet at any given moment. Therefore, find out what you need to be able to reach and verify connectivity for that network.

share|improve this answer
    
I believe it's "as the default gateway for the internet connection". I had a machine where the default (primary) NIC was connected to the data center, and the secondary NIC was the internet. So you should select the gateway that connects you to the internet. – Hosam Aly Feb 5 '09 at 12:02
1  
The point is there's really no way to be sure, but you at least have to be able to see the default gateway to get outside the local IP network. – Brian Rasmussen Feb 5 '09 at 12:06
    
I think there is a way to be sure. Take a look at my answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/515436#515607 – Hosam Aly Feb 5 '09 at 14:08
    
@Hosam - what I meant about "no way to be sure" was that it makes little sense to speak about the internet as something you either can or cannot access, cause even with outside access you may not be able to access the site IP addresses you need. – Brian Rasmussen Feb 5 '09 at 14:31
    
@Brian, you're right. I didn't think about this case. But the OP was asking about general internet connectivity, so I didn't think about blocked websites. Thanks for the clarification. – Hosam Aly Feb 5 '09 at 14:46

I suggest this simple code since tracert is not always effective and whatsmyip.com is not specially designed for that purpose :

private void GetIP()
{
    WebClient wc = new WebClient();
    string strIP = wc.DownloadString("http://checkip.dyndns.org");
    strIP = (new Regex(@"\b\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\b")).Match(strIP).Value;
    wc.Dispose();
    return strIP;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This will not work behind NAT – Esben Skov Pedersen Dec 7 '09 at 12:00
    
that's the internet address he want to get, why this won't work ? – Hassen Dec 7 '09 at 16:22
    
Just what I was looking for! +1 – Gerardo Grignoli Nov 28 '10 at 23:41
1  
tricky solution and depends upon 3rd party. so will not go with this. but +1 to give a way. – Romil Kumar Jain Jun 23 '14 at 14:26

This is my attempt to get the default IPv4 address without having to resort to DNS or external process calls to commands like ipconfig and route. Hopefully the next version of .Net will provide access to the Windows routing table.

public static IPAddress GetDefaultIPv4Address()
{
    var adapters = from adapter in NetworkInterface.GetAllNetworkInterfaces()
                   where adapter.OperationalStatus == OperationalStatus.Up &&
                    adapter.Supports(NetworkInterfaceComponent.IPv4)
                    && adapter.GetIPProperties().GatewayAddresses.Count > 0 &&
                    adapter.GetIPProperties().GatewayAddresses[0].Address.ToString() != "0.0.0.0"
                   select adapter;

     if (adapters.Count() > 1)
     {
          throw new ApplicationException("The default IPv4 address could not be determined as there are two interfaces with gateways.");
     }
     else
     {
         UnicastIPAddressInformationCollection localIPs = adapters.First().GetIPProperties().UnicastAddresses;
         foreach (UnicastIPAddressInformation localIP in localIPs)
         {
            if (localIP.Address.AddressFamily == AddressFamily.InterNetwork &&
                !localIP.Address.ToString().StartsWith(LINK_LOCAL_BLOCK_PREFIX) &&
                !IPAddress.IsLoopback(localIP.Address))
            {
                return localIP.Address;
            }
        }
    }

    return null;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Can you define LINK_LOCAL_BLOCK_PREFIX please? Is it "169."? – jocull Sep 10 '12 at 2:34
    
P.S. this is the best solution <3 – jocull Sep 10 '12 at 2:52
    
works great, tested with different scenarios and most recommended and preferred. – Jsinh Apr 24 '13 at 13:28

Not 100% accurate (some ISPs don't give you public IP addresses), but you can check if the IP address is on one of the ranges reserved for private addresses. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classful_network

share|improve this answer
    
I know of a network where all the computers are dual-homed. The NICs with Internet access are 172.22.x.x (private IPs), while the NICs on a private LAN are 126.x.x.x (public IPs). – Gabe Dec 17 '10 at 6:29

A hacky way is to fetch and scrape one of the many 'What Is My IP' type websites.

share|improve this answer
    
i know that, but this is not a good solution :) – Lukas Šalkauskas Feb 5 '09 at 11:11
1  
This is actually the only correct solution yet - if you want to do this the proper way, you need to set up a tiny web service that echoes the calling IP address back to the caller – Paul Betts Feb 5 '09 at 15:11
    
@Paul: your idea is nice, except that it wouldn't work behind NAT. – Hosam Aly Feb 7 '09 at 6:21

I found a solution:

IPGlobalProperties ipProperties = IPGlobalProperties.GetIPGlobalProperties();
Console.WriteLine(ipProperties.HostName);

        foreach (NetworkInterface networkCard in NetworkInterface.GetAllNetworkInterfaces())
        {
            foreach (GatewayIPAddressInformation gatewayAddr in networkCard.GetIPProperties().GatewayAddresses)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Information: ");
                Console.WriteLine("Interface type: {0}", networkCard.NetworkInterfaceType.ToString());
                Console.WriteLine("Name: {0}", networkCard.Name);
                Console.WriteLine("Id: {0}", networkCard.Id);
                Console.WriteLine("Description: {0}", networkCard.Description);
                Console.WriteLine("Gateway address: {0}", gatewayAddr.Address.ToString());
                Console.WriteLine("IP: {0}", System.Net.Dns.GetHostByName(System.Net.Dns.GetHostName()).AddressList[0].ToString());
                Console.WriteLine("Speed: {0}", networkCard.Speed);
                Console.WriteLine("MAC: {0}", networkCard.GetPhysicalAddress().ToString());
            }
        }
share|improve this answer
1  
That code doesn't return the IP associated with the specified network card -- For me it returns the IP of my Windows Mobile device (instead of my wired or Wi-Fi connection) – Rowland Shaw Feb 5 '09 at 12:38
    
Yeah sure, because I choose [0], but in other way you can choose it by network card ID, or name, or MAC, or gateway by network interface. – Lukas Šalkauskas Feb 5 '09 at 13:15
    
But the question was "how can I detect IP which is connected to internet with C# ?", and this code doesn't. – Rowland Shaw Feb 5 '09 at 20:53
    
but This code helps ;) – Lukas Šalkauskas Feb 6 '09 at 7:18

Here is an article which could be helpful:

How to Retrieve "Network Interfaces" in C#

The following code is used to retrieve the "network interfaces" in C#. You may recognize the "network interfaces" as "Network and Dial-up Connections": You can access them by using "Start > Setting > Network and Dial-up Connections". C# does not provide a simple way of retrieving this list.

share|improve this answer

I already search that, i found it in this codeplex project http://www.codeplex.com/xedus. It a none working P2P freeware but there is a class that use the right API to get the lan card witch has the internet ip

share|improve this answer
    
Which class is it? – Hosam Aly Feb 7 '09 at 6:24

Try to ping www.google.com on both interfaces.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, and how I will get my IP ? – Lukas Šalkauskas Feb 5 '09 at 11:13
    
Do you mean that you don't have access to the IP address of each ethernet card? Something similar to ifconfig? – mouviciel Feb 5 '09 at 11:25
    
How can you choose which interface the ping will go through? – Hosam Aly Feb 7 '09 at 6:22
    
You don't choose: you ping both and the one which gets a response is connected to internet. – mouviciel Feb 7 '09 at 13:10

For a quick hack (that will certainly become broken with elaborate LAN configurations or IPv6), get a list of all IPs the current machine has, and strip out all IP:s that match any of the following:

10.*
127.*          // <- Kudos to Brian for spotting the mistake
172.[16-31].*
192.168.*
share|improve this answer
    
Actually the loopback network is a 127.0.0.0/8 so it is not just one address. – Brian Rasmussen Feb 5 '09 at 11:12
    
...And this won't work if you're behind a NAT firewall – Rowland Shaw Feb 5 '09 at 12:32

Use tracert. The first hop should always be on the same subnet as your internet NIC.

example from command prompt.

tracert google.com

the first line is 10.0.0.254 and my nic has the ip of 10.0.2.48. Then it is a simple exercise of parsing the output from tracert.

share|improve this answer

An alternative solution (that is probably more accurate) is to use the Windows route command. Here is some code that works for me on Windows Vista:

static string getInternetConnectionIP()
{
    using (Process route = new Process())
    {
        ProcessStartInfo startInfo = route.StartInfo;
        startInfo.FileName = "route.exe";
        startInfo.Arguments = "print 0.0.0.0";
        startInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
        startInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
        route.Start();

        using (StreamReader reader = route.StandardOutput)
        {
            string line;
            do
            {
                line = reader.ReadLine();
            } while (!line.StartsWith("          0.0.0.0"));

            // the interface is the fourth entry in the line
            return line.Split(new char[] { ' ' },
                              StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries)[3];
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

in the same direction as Lukas Šalkauskas, a friend of mine and I wrote this code:

   /* digged, built and (here and there) copied "as is" from web, without paying attention to style.
    Please, do not shot us for this. 
   */
public static void DisplayIPAddresses() 
    { 

        Console.WriteLine("\r\n****************************"); 
        Console.WriteLine("     IPAddresses"); 
        Console.WriteLine("****************************"); 


        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(); 
        // Get a list of all network interfaces (usually one per network card, dialup, and VPN connection)      
        NetworkInterface[] networkInterfaces = NetworkInterface.GetAllNetworkInterfaces(); 

        foreach (NetworkInterface network in networkInterfaces) 
        { 

            if (network.OperationalStatus == OperationalStatus.Up ) 
            { 
                if (network.NetworkInterfaceType == NetworkInterfaceType.Tunnel) continue; 
                if (network.NetworkInterfaceType == NetworkInterfaceType.Tunnel) continue; 
                //GatewayIPAddressInformationCollection GATE = network.GetIPProperties().GatewayAddresses; 
                // Read the IP configuration for each network    

                IPInterfaceProperties properties = network.GetIPProperties(); 
                //discard those who do not have a real gateaway  
                if (properties.GatewayAddresses.Count > 0) 
                { 
                    bool good = false; 
                    foreach  (GatewayIPAddressInformation gInfo in properties.GatewayAddresses) 
                    { 
                        //not a true gateaway (VmWare Lan) 
                        if (!gInfo.Address.ToString().Equals("0.0.0.0")) 
                        { 
                            sb.AppendLine(" GATEAWAY "+ gInfo.Address.ToString()); 
                            good = true; 
                            break; 
                        } 
                    } 
                    if (!good) 
                    { 
                        continue; 
                    } 
                } 
                else { 
                    continue; 
                } 
                // Each network interface may have multiple IP addresses        
                foreach (IPAddressInformation address in properties.UnicastAddresses) 
                { 
                    // We're only interested in IPv4 addresses for now        
                    if (address.Address.AddressFamily != AddressFamily.InterNetwork) continue; 

                    // Ignore loopback addresses (e.g., 127.0.0.1)     
                    if (IPAddress.IsLoopback(address.Address)) continue; 

                    if (!address.IsDnsEligible) continue; 
                    if (address.IsTransient) continue;  

                    sb.AppendLine(address.Address.ToString() + " (" + network.Name + ") nType:" + network.NetworkInterfaceType.ToString()     ); 
                } 
            } 
        } 
        Console.WriteLine(sb.ToString()); 
    }
share|improve this answer

You could simply read http://myip.dnsomatic.com/

It's a reliable service by OpenDNS, and I use it to get the external IP all the time.

share|improve this answer
    
This shows '192.168.1.4' for me. Not so reliable, I guess. – Jan Jungnickel Mar 8 '09 at 15:25
    
What does whatismyip.com show? – Can Berk Güder Mar 8 '09 at 15:30
    
The 'correct' public Address. – Jan Jungnickel Mar 9 '09 at 6:03
    
Then you can use whatismyip.com's API. I think this kind of approach is more reliable and elegant than a local-only approach. – Can Berk Güder Mar 9 '09 at 11:24

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