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I know why this is happening but can somebody point me in the right direction of syntax?

Currently I have:

var expense = from e in db.I_ITEM
              where e.ExpenseId == expenseId
              select e;

return expense.Sum(x => x.Mileage ?? 0);

My problem is that x.Mileage is of type "double?" and has null values in the db.

The error I get is:

Exception Details: System.InvalidOperationException: The cast to value type 'Double' failed because the materialized value is null. Either the result type's generic parameter or the query must use a nullable type.

What would be the correct syntax?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

I'm surprised that fails, but an alternative which might work is simply to sum the nullable values and then use the null coalescing operator:

return expense.Sum(x => x.Mileage) ?? 0d;

Certainly in LINQ to Objects this would do the right thing, ignoring null values and giving you a null result (before the null coalescing operator) if there were no non-null values in the sequence.

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Isn't this really a bug in Linq to whatever? Type safety is broken. –  sinelaw Feb 1 '13 at 1:55
    
@sinelaw: It looks like it, yes. It's hard to say without more details though. –  Jon Skeet Feb 1 '13 at 6:45
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may give you an opinion...

    decimal depts = 0;

    var query = from p in dc.Payments
                where p.UserID == UserID
                select p.Amount;

    if (query.Count() > 0)
    {
        depts = query.Sum();
    }

    return depts;
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Is the if (query.Count() > 0) needed? –  Austin Henley Oct 29 '12 at 15:00
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What about excluding the nulls, ie

var expense = 
          from e in db.I_ITEM
          where (e.ExpenseId == expenseId) && (e.Mileage.HasValue)
          select e;

 return expense.Sum(x => x.Mileage);
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var expense = (from e in db.I_ITEM
              where e.ExpenseId == expenseId
              select e.Mileage??0D);
return expense.Sum();
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Which O/R mapper are you using, and which DB are you using? (Linq to SQL/Entity Framework/SQL Server)?

Since the expression is executed in the DB as a SQL statement, I would think it would work without the coalescing operator:

var expense = from e in db.I_ITEM where e.ExpenseId == expenseId select e;

return expense.Sum(x => x.Mileage);

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