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I have a Custom UITableViewCell that has a couple buttons. When the code was all under one view controller, my button was declared like this:

myButton = [UIButton buttonWithType:UIButtonTypeRoundedRect];
[myButton addTarget:self
             action:@selector(myButtonAction:)
   forControlEvents:UIControlEventTouchUpInside];
[myButton setTitle:@"Action" forState:UIControlStateNormal];
myButton.frame = CGRectMake(20, 80, 72, 37);
[self addSubview:myButton];

Last night I subclassed UITableViewCell, so the code became this:

myButton = [UIButton buttonWithType:UIButtonTypeRoundedRect];
[myButton addTarget:viewController
             action:@selector(myButtonAction:)
   forControlEvents:UIControlEventTouchUpInside];
[myButton setTitle:@"Action" forState:UIControlStateNormal];
myButton.frame = CGRectMake(20, 80, 72, 37);
[self addSubview:damageButton];

Since doing this, however, pushing the button on any cell causes the action to only effect the first row in the table, and I'm not sure why.

Action code:

UIButton *button = (UIButton *)sender;
UIView *contentView = [button superview];
UITableViewCell *cell = (UITableViewCell *)[contentView superview];
NSIndexPath *indexPath = [[self tableView] indexPathForCell:cell];

//do something with objectAtIndex:indexPath.row

I understand it's common to set the Tag Property to indexPath.row for using a UIButton in a table view. However, I'm using two separate arrays in the data source to populate two different sections of the TableView, so I don't think that will work.

share|improve this question
    
maybe it's just me but the code for the button looks exactly the same. –  Matthias Bauch Mar 1 '11 at 13:03
    
Maybe your code isn't really like that, but you're not adding the same button you're creating (myButton vs damageButton). –  jv42 Mar 1 '11 at 13:24
    
@fluchtpunkt - The only difference is the target is a view controller I'm passing as a property –  DVG Mar 1 '11 at 14:23
    
@jv42 was renaming things to make it generic, missed that one. –  DVG Mar 1 '11 at 14:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The problem, in the end, was that I was adding the subview to the cell object and not the contentview of the cell object. I changed the button code to this and it was resolved:

UIButton *button = (UIButton *)sender;
UITableViewCell *cell = (UITableViewCell *)[button superview];
NSIndexPath *indexPath = [[self tableView] indexPathForCell:cell];
share|improve this answer

Don't subclass UITableViewCell (or UITableView), it's usually unnecessary and can cause problems. Table cells have a contentView which is a great place for customization.

Recommended reading:

http://cocoawithlove.com/2009/04/easy-custom-uitableview-drawing.html

and then:

http://cocoawithlove.com/2010/12/uitableview-construction-drawing-and.html

share|improve this answer
    
Hmmm. I was subclassing UITableViewCell to deal with a problem with scrolling performance I was having. Perhaps there is a better way. –  DVG Mar 1 '11 at 14:26
2  
I'm subclassing UITableViewCell all the time to avoid putting lots of presentation code in ViewControllers, putting it in isolated cell classes instead. –  jv42 Mar 1 '11 at 15:20
    
But I agree with the article you've linked: do not abuse subclassing, and specifically, do not use it for the wrong reasons. –  jv42 Mar 1 '11 at 15:23
    
Actual drawing is sometimes better done in the contentView of a UITableViewCell (which you can have a rendering object for), rather than by the UITableViewCell itself. –  occulus Mar 2 '11 at 12:04

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