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This was prompted by How to compare TFunc/TProc containing function/procedure of object?, specifically by David's comment to Barry's question. Since I don't have a Blog to post this to I'm going to ask this question here, and answer it.

Question: When and how are variables referenced in Delphi's anonymous methods captured?

Example:

procedure ProcedureThatUsesAnonymousMethods;
var V: string;
    F1: TFunc<string>;
    F2: TFunc<string>;
begin
  F1 := function: string
        begin
          Result := V; // references local variable
        end
  V := '1';
  F2 := function: string
        begin
          Result := V;
        end
 V := '2';
 ShowMessage(F1);
 ShowMessage(F2);
end;

Both ShowMessage are going to show 2. Why? How does V get captured and when?

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2  
Posting at SO is also more helpful to the community. (And, of course, you get a lot more rep by posting here! :) ) –  Andreas Rejbrand Mar 1 '11 at 13:13
1  
Hm... Are functions/procedures called "methods" if they do not belong to an object? –  Andreas Rejbrand Mar 1 '11 at 13:15
    
which delphi version are you using? –  kiw Mar 1 '11 at 13:18
    
@Andreas, I call them "methods" only if they belong to a class. I just re-read both the question and the answer, and if I did mix the two, I can't spot the mixup :-( –  Cosmin Prund Mar 1 '11 at 13:20
    
I was thinking about ProcedureThatUsesAnonymousMethods; I have never thought about this until now, but even if F1 and F2 are anonymous, are they methods? –  Andreas Rejbrand Mar 1 '11 at 13:20

1 Answer 1

When you have a function like the one in the question, where you have an anonymous method accessing a local variable, Delphi appears to create one TInterfacedObject descendant that captures all the stack based variables as it's own public variables. Using Barry's trick to get to the implementing TObject and a bit of RTTI we can see this whole thing in action.

The magic code behind the implementation probably looks like this:

// Magic object that holds what would normally be Stack variables and implements
// anonymous methods.
type ProcedureThatUsesAnonymousMethods$ActRec = class(TInterfacedObject)
public
  V: string;
  function AnonMethodImp: string;
end;

// The procedure with all the magic brought to light
procedure ProcedureThatUsesAnonymousMethods;
var MagicInterface: IUnknown;
    F1: TFunc<string>;
    F2: TFunc<string>;
begin
  MagicInterface := ProcedureThatUsesAnonymousMethods$ActRec.Create;
  try
    F1 := MagicInterface.AnonMethod;
    MagicInterface.V := '1';
    F2 := MagicInterface.SomeOtherAnonMethod;
    MagicInterface.V := '2';
    ShowMessage(F1);
    ShowMessage(F2);
  finally MagicInterface := nil;
  end;
end;

Of course this code doesn't compile. I'm magic-less :-) But the idea here is that an "Magic" object is created behind the scenes and local variables that are referenced from the anonymous method are transformed in public fields of the magic object. That object is uses as an interface (IUnkown) so it gets reference-counted. Apparently the same object captures all used variables AND defines all the anonymous methods.

This should answer both "When" and "How".

Here's the code I used to investigate. Put a TButton on a blank form, this should be the whole unit. When you press the button you'll see the following on screen, in sequence:

  • 000000 (bogus number)
  • 000000 (the same number): This proofs both anonymous methods are actually implemented as methods of the same object!
  • TForm25.Button1Click$ActRec: TInterfacedObject : This shows the object behind the implementation, it's derived from TInterfacedObject
  • OnStack:string: RTTI discovers this field on that object.
  • Self: TForm25: RTTI discovers this field on that object. It's used to get the value of ClasVar
  • FRefCount:Integer - this comes from TInterfacedObject
  • Class Var - result of ShowMessage.
  • On Stack - result of ShowMessage.

Here's the code:

unit Unit25;

interface

uses
  Windows, Messages, SysUtils, Variants, Classes, Graphics, Controls, Forms,
  Dialogs, StdCtrls, Rtti;

type
  TForm25 = class(TForm)
    Button1: TButton;
    procedure Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
  private
    ClassVar: string;
  public
  end;

var
  Form25: TForm25;

implementation

{$R *.dfm}

procedure TForm25.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
var F1: TFunc<string>;
    F2: TFunc<string>;

    OnStack: string;

    i: IInterface;
    o: TObject;

    RC: TRttiContext;
    R: TRttiType;
    RF: TRttiField;

begin
  // This anonymous method references a member field of the TForm class
  F1 := function :string
        begin
          Result := ClassVar;
        end;

  i := PUnknown(@F1)^;
  o := i as TObject;
  ShowMessage(IntToStr(Integer(o))); // I'm looking at the pointer to see if it's the same instance as the one for the other Anonymous method

  // This anonymous method references a stack variable
  F2 := function :string
        begin
          Result := OnStack;
        end;

  i := PUnknown(@F2)^;
  o := i as TObject;
  ShowMessage(IntToStr(Integer(o)));

  ShowMessage(o.ClassName + ': ' + o.ClassType.ClassParent.ClassName);

  RC.Create;
  try
    R := RC.GetType(o.ClassType);
    for RF in R.GetFields do
      ShowMessage(RF.Name + ':' + RF.FieldType.Name);
  finally RC.Free;
  end;

  ClassVar := 'Class Var';
  OnStack := 'On Stack';

  ShowMessage(F1);
  ShowMessage(F2);
end;

end.
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