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I have written a query which returns all records with some many-to-many joins correctly for the entire set or an individual article using WHERE a.id = ?

SELECT a.id, date_added, title, content, category_id, person_id, organization_id, c.name AS category_name, firstname, lastname, o.name AS organization_name

FROM articles AS a

LEFT OUTER JOIN articles_categories AS ac ON a.id=ac.article_id
LEFT OUTER JOIN categories AS c ON c.id=ac.category_id

LEFT OUTER JOIN articles_people AS ap ON a.id=ap.article_id
LEFT OUTER JOIN people AS p ON p.id=ap.person_id

LEFT OUTER JOIN articles_organizations AS ao ON a.id=ao.article_id
LEFT OUTER JOIN organizations AS o ON o.id=ao.organization_id

ORDER BY date_added

BUT!

I've hit a brick wall trying to work out how to limit the articles to a specific number of IDs, for working with pagination.

I'm ideally trying to use as simple and clear SQL statements as possible because I'm using the codeigniter framework with their active record class. http://codeigniter.com/user_guide/database/active_record.html

Would really appreciate some help as I don't want to revert to using multiple queries for this as I've tried to reduce it down to a single query for database efficiency.

Have search around and tried some alternatives but nothing seems to work. Many thanks!

For example the results I return are like this

---------------------------------------------------------------------
id     title        category_id       person_id       organization_id
---------------------------------------------------------------------
1      test              1                1                  1
1      test              2                1                  1
1      test              1                2                  1
1      test              1                1                  2
1      test              5                1                  1
1      test              8                1                  1
1      test              1                4                  1
1      test              1                4                  2
1      test              1                1                  1
2      test 2            2                1                  1
2      test 2            1                2                  1
2      test 2            1                1                  2
2      test 2            5                1                  1
2      test 2            8                1                  1
2      test 2            1                4                  1
2      test 2            1                4                  2

I need the results like this so that I can create sub-arrays in the php like this:


$articles = $query->result_array();

$output = array();

foreach ($articles as $article) {

    // set up article details   
    $article_id = $article['id'];

    // add article details
    $output[$article_id]['article_id'] = $article_id;
    $output[$article_id]['date_added'] = $article['date_added'];
    $output[$article_id]['title'] = $article['title'];
    $output[$article_id]['content'] = $article['content'];

    // set up people details and add people array with details if exists
    if (isset($article['person_id'])) {
        $person_id = $article['person_id'];

        $output[$article_id]['people'][$person_id]['person_id'] = $person_id;
        $output[$article_id]['people'][$person_id]['lastname'] = $article['lastname'];
        $output[$article_id]['people'][$person_id]['firstname'] = $article['firstname'];
    }

    // set up organizations details and add organizations array with details if exists
    if (isset($article['organization_id'])) {
        $organization_id = $article['organization_id'];

        $output[$article_id]['organizations'][$organization_id]['organization_id'] = $organization_id;
        $output[$article_id]['organizations'][$organization_id]['organization_name'] = $article['organization_name'];               
    }

    // set up categories details and add categories array with details if exists
    if (isset($article['category_id'])) {
        $category_id = $article['category_id'];

        $output[$article_id]['categories'][$category_id]['category_id'] = $category_id;
        $output[$article_id]['categories'][$category_id]['category_name'] = $article['category_name'];
    }       

}

But if I just use LIMIT (with offset etc) 1

the results I get are

---------------------------------------------------------------------
id     title        category_id       person_id       organization_id
---------------------------------------------------------------------
1      test              1                1                  1

instead of

---------------------------------------------------------------------
id     title        category_id       person_id       organization_id
---------------------------------------------------------------------
1      test              1                1                  1
1      test              2                1                  1
1      test              1                2                  1
1      test              1                1                  2
1      test              5                1                  1
1      test              8                1                  1
1      test              1                4                  1
1      test              1                4                  2
1      test              1                1                  1

which is my desired result.

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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

OK, so finally I worked out how it is possible.

Thought i'd include it here in case anyone else has the same problem.

Changing this line


FROM articles AS a

to this


FROM (SELECT * FROM articles LIMIT 5,3) AS a

does what I wanted.

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Glad you figured it out in the end. Your original question in no way hinted that this was the result you were after. –  Treffynnon Mar 1 '11 at 17:48
    
My apologies for not being clear enough originally Treffynnon and thanks for the effort you made in responding. I'm still learning but will try to be more precise with my questions in the future. :-) –  Chris Mar 2 '11 at 15:42
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So, why don't you use OFFSET 0,10 and LIMIT *number_of_results* in the SQL Query? (if I understood the question)

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Thanks Runeroniek, i've just updated my question to make it more clear. Hopefully that explains why using LIMIT alone doesn't return the result i'd like? –  Chris Mar 1 '11 at 15:40
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Specific number of IDs... WHERE ID IN (2,4,6,8)... ?

Are you using codeigniter's pagination? http://codeigniter.com/user_guide/libraries/pagination.html

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Hi i've updated my question to illustrate the point better. I can use WHERE to find the individual article details but I would like to be able to paginate using the codeigniter pagination you linked to which I think demands a limit and offset, or equivalent to function. Thanks for your help! –  Chris Mar 1 '11 at 15:34
    
Hello, you can use few selects instead of many joins, or if you want to use your query try sub-query: WHERE a.id IN (SELECT id FROM articles LIMIT 5) –  Marsio Mar 9 '11 at 15:39
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You can easily limit the number of records that are being returned using the MySQL LIMIT clause. This can be achieved like the following with your sample query.

SELECT a.id, date_added, title, content, category_id, person_id, organization_id, c.name AS category_name, firstname, lastname, o.name AS organization_name

FROM articles AS a

LEFT OUTER JOIN articles_categories AS ac ON a.id=ac.article_id LEFT OUTER JOIN categories AS c ON c.id=ac.category_id

LEFT OUTER JOIN articles_people AS ap ON a.id=ap.article_id LEFT OUTER JOIN people AS p ON p.id=ap.person_id

LEFT OUTER JOIN articles_organizations AS ao ON a.id=ao.article_id LEFT OUTER JOIN organizations AS o ON o.id=ao.organization_id

ORDER BY date_added
LIMIT 10

Where 10 is the number of records you wish to display. The MySQL LIMIT clause allows you to specify a limit of the number of records and an initial offset. Like so:

LIMIT <offset>,<limit>

In your case <offset> would be the current page * the number of records on a page. <limit> would be the number of records you would like to display per page.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, I've updated my question to make it a bit more clear. I am trying to limit the articles not just by the number of records exactly but the number of ids multiplied by the amount of results for each id. Hopefully that makes more sense? –  Chris Mar 1 '11 at 15:39
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