Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

if i dupe topic i really sorry, i searched for it with no result here. I have code

void split(char* str, char* splitstr)
{
     char* p;
     char splitbuf[32];
     int i=0;
     p = strtok(str,",");
     while(p!= NULL)
     {
               printf("%s", p);    
               sprintf(&splitstr[i],"%s",p);
               i++;
               p = strtok (NULL, ",");

     }
}

How can i use proper sprintf to put the splited words by strtok to string array? Can i somehow avoid breaklines created by strtok? I am programming in ANSI C. I declared array splitstr and str the same way.

char* splitstr;//in main char splitstr[32];

Thanks for help.


edit:

i would like do something like this:
INPUT (it is a string) > "aa,bbb,ccc,ddd"
I declare: char tab[33];
OUTPUT (save all items to array of strings if it is even possible) > 
tab[0] is "aa"
tab[1] is "bbb"
...
tab[3] is "ddd" but not "ddd(newline)"

edit2 [18:16]

I forgot add that the data string is from reading line of file. That's why i wrote about "ddd(newline)". I found after that the new line was also shown by strtok but as another item. By the way all answers are good to think over the problem. Few seconds ago my laptop has Broken (i dont know why the screen gone black) As soon as i take control over my pc i will check codes. :-)

share|improve this question
    
Not quite sure what you're trying to achieve. If you call split with the string "a,b,c", what do you expect splitstr to come back with? Are you wanting to create an array of C strings {"a", "b", "c"}? –  Tom Quarendon Mar 1 '11 at 14:59
    
Pay attention to the difference between arrays and pointers. They are not the same thing. –  pmg Mar 1 '11 at 15:02
    
strtok is a somewhat "difficult" function to work with. If you want, for example, to split the string "one two three" by the spaces, strtok changes that string (it cannot be a pointer to a literal string) to "one#two#three" where the '#' are in fact NUL characters ('\0'). –  pmg Mar 1 '11 at 15:06
    
As Kevin below says, if you're wanting to end up with an array of strings, then you'll need to declare splitstr as char[something][32]. Also as @pmg says, you need to be very careful you understand the difference between arrays and pointers. –  Tom Quarendon Mar 1 '11 at 15:42
    
The issue about the newline after the last value is the simplest issue to deal with. It's there because of the input method you've used has left it there (whatever that method may be). If you don't want it, you'd be best stripping it off before you even get to your split method. The reason you get "ddd(newline) is because you start with "aa,bbb,ccc,ddd(newline)". Neither strtok nor sprintf are putting that there for you. BTW you'd be better off using strcpy rather than sprintf. –  Tom Quarendon Mar 1 '11 at 15:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Give this a shot:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
...
void split(char *str, char **splitstr) 
{      
  char *p;      
  int i=0;      

  p = strtok(str,",");      
  while(p!= NULL)      
  {                
    printf("%s", p);
    splitsr[i] = malloc(strlen(p) + 1);
    if (splitstr[i])
      strcpy(splitstr[i], p);
    i++;
    p = strtok (NULL, ",");       
  } 
}

And then, in main:

#define MAX_LEN  ... // max allowed length of input string, including 0 terminator
#define MAX_STR  ... // max allowed number of substrings in input string

int main(void)
{
  char input[MAX_LEN]; 
  char *strs[MAX_STR] = {NULL}; 
  ...
  split(input, strs);
  ...
}

Some explanations.

strs is defined in main as an array of pointer to char. Each array element will point to a string extracted from the input string. In main, all that's allocated is the array of pointers, with each element initially NULL; the memory for each element will be allocated within the split function using malloc, based on the length of the substring. Somewhere after you are finished with strs you will need to deallocate those pointers using free:

for (i = 0; i < MAX_STR; i++)
  free(strs[i]);

Now, why is splitstr declared as char ** instead of char *[MAX_STR]? Except when it is the operand of the sizeof or & operators, or is a string literal being used to initialize another array in a declaration, an array expression will have its type implicitly converted from N-element array of T to pointer to T, and the value of the expression will be the location of the first element in the array.

When we call split:

split(input, strs);

the array expression input is implicitly converted from type char [MAX_LENGTH] to char * (T == char), and the array expression strs is implicitly converted from type char *[MAX_STRS] to char ** (T == char *). So splitstr receives pointer values for the two parameters, as opposed to array values.

share|improve this answer

If I understand correctly, you want to save the strings obtained by strtok. In that case you'll want to declare splitstr as char[MAX_LINES][32] and use strcpy, something like this:

strcpy(splitstr[i], p);

where i is the ith string read using strtok.

share|improve this answer

Note that I'm no ansi C expert, more C++ expert, but here's working code. It uses a fixed size array, which may or may not be an issue. To do anything else would require more complicated memory management:

/* Not sure about the declaration of splitstr here, and whether there's a better way.
   char** isn't sufficient. */
int split(char* str, char splitstr[256][32])
{
   char* p;
   int i=0;
   p = strtok(str,",");
   while(p) {
   strcpy(splitstr[i++], p);
       p = strtok (NULL, ",");
   }
   return i;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
 char input[256];
  char result[256][32];
  strcpy(input, "aa,bbb,ccc,ddd");
  int count = split(input, result);

  for (int i=0; i<count; i++) {
    printf("%s\n", result[i]);
  }
      printf("the end\n");
}

Note that I supply "aa,bbb,ccc,ddd" in and I get {"aa", "bbb", "ccc", "ddd" } out. No newlines on the result.

share|improve this answer
    
yes it's true, i see it clearly but what will happen if i read something like this: line1:aa,bb,cc(newline) line2:dd,ee,(newline) ?Result: aa bb cc (double space) dd ee. Right? –  deadfish Mar 1 '11 at 17:24
    
Hmm. Not sure what you mean. If you pass "aa,bb,cc(newline)" into split you'll get {"aa","bb","cc(newline)" }. The if you pass in "dd,ee,(newline)" you'll get {"dd","ee","(newline)"}. Not sure what you're expecting here or what you're expecting by "(double space)". If you don't want the newlines on the end of the output strings, you have to remove the newline from the end of the string after you've read it in and before you pass to split. –  Tom Quarendon Mar 1 '11 at 17:46
    
yes yes :) thanks :) –  deadfish Mar 1 '11 at 18:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.