Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to convert an integer number in C into an array containing each of that number's digits

i.e. if I have

int number = 5400

how can I get to

int numberArray[4]

where

numberArray[0] = 0;
numberArray[1] = 0;
numberArray[2] = 4;
numberArray[3] = 5;

Any suggestions gratefully received

--dave

share|improve this question
add comment

7 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This would work for numbers >= 0

#include <math.h>

char * convertNumberIntoArray(unsigned int number) {
    int length = (int)floor(log10((float)number)) + 1;
    char * arr = new char[length];
    int i = 0;
    do {
    	arr[i] = number % 10;
    	number /= 10;
    	i++;
    } while (number != 0);
    return arr;
}

EDIT: Just a little bit more C style but more cryptic.

#include <math.h>

char * convertNumberIntoArray(unsigned int number) {
    unsigned int length = (int)(log10((float)number)) + 1;
    char * arr = (char *) malloc(length * sizeof(char)), * curr = arr;
    do {
    	*curr++ = number % 10;
    	number /= 10;
    } while (number != 0);
    return arr;
}
share|improve this answer
    
why is this function a char pointer ? And what does new char[length] do? It looks like a pointer to the first index of the array, but my compiler doesn't seem to like 'new char' –  droseman Feb 5 '09 at 15:36
    
'new char' is C++speak. The proper way to do it in C is the second bit of code. –  Chris Lutz Feb 5 '09 at 15:46
    
Also, it's important that, at the end of your program, you call free() on whatever array you got back from this function. Otherwise you leak memory. –  Chris Lutz Feb 5 '09 at 15:53
1  
Shouldn't this be returning int *? –  Nick Presta Feb 5 '09 at 15:53
    
It might but there's no reason to use 4 byte int to store 4 bit digit. Char is just more compact way to do that, although it could easily be substituted to ints. –  vava Feb 6 '09 at 0:25
add comment

Hint: Take a look at this earlier question "Sum of digits in C#". It explains how to extract the digits in the number using several methods, some relevant in C.

From Greg Hewgill's answer:

/* count number of digits */
int c = 0; /* digit position */
int n = number;

while (n != 0)
{
    n /= 10;
    c++;
}

int numberArray[c];

c = 0;    
n = number;

/* extract each digit */
while (n != 0)
{
    numberArray[c] = n % 10;
    n /= 10;
    c++;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

You could calculate the number of digits in an integer with logarithm rather than a loop. Thus,

int * toArray(int number)
{
    int n = log10(number) + 1;
    int i;
    int *numberArray = calloc(n, sizeof(int));
    for ( i = 0; i < n; ++i, number /= 10 )
    {
        numberArray[i] = number % 10;
    }
    return numberArray;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 This looks good to me –  Mark Pim Feb 5 '09 at 14:55
add comment

If you need to take negative numbers into account, you might need some extra logic. In fact, when playing around with arrays you don't know the size of upfront, you may want to do some more safety checking, and adding an API for handling the structure of the data is quite handy too.

// returns the number of digits converted
// stores the digits in reverse order (smalles digit first)
// precondition: outputdigits is big enough to store all digits.
//
int convert( int number, int* outputdigits, int* signdigit ) {

  int* workingdigits = outputdigits;

  int sign = 1;
  if( number < 0 ) { *signdigit = -1; number *= -1; }
  ++workingdigits;

  for ( ; number > 0; ++ workingdigits ) {
    *workingdigits = number % 10;
    number = number / 10;
  }

  return workingdigits - outputdigits;
}

void printdigits( int* digits, int size, int signdigit ) {
  if( signdigit < 0 ) printf( "-" );

  for( int* digit = digits+size-1; digit >= digits; --digit ){
    printf( "%d", *digit );
  }
}

int main() {
   int digits[10];
   int signdigit;
   printdigits( digits, convert( 10, digits, &signdigit ), signdigit );
   printdigits( digits, convert( -10, digits, &signdigit ), signdigit );
   printdigits( digits, convert( 1005, digits, &signdigit ), signdigit );

}
share|improve this answer
    
no negative numbers required, fortunately. Its an upcounting hours counter. It is possible that this number could get quite large, though. –  droseman Feb 5 '09 at 13:50
add comment

Figuring out the number of digits is tricky, but assuming it's always 4 digits you can do:

for (i = 0; i < 4; i++) {
  numberArray[i] = number%10;
  number = number div 10;
}
share|improve this answer
    
In C, it's called /, not div. –  David Hanak Feb 5 '09 at 12:11
    
No, numbers of digits is easy. Just use log10(a) + 1. –  vava Feb 5 '09 at 12:20
    
in some cases, surely this would evaluate to the incorrect value ? e.g. log10(50)+1 = 2.70 = 3 as an integer. –  droseman Feb 5 '09 at 12:32
    
its not going to be always 4 digits - its an incremental counter –  droseman Feb 5 '09 at 12:33
    
It's always would work by definition of logarithm. But you have to floor() result as conversion to (int) does. –  vava Feb 5 '09 at 12:35
show 2 more comments

C code:

/* one decimal digit takes a few more than 3 bits. (2^3=8, 2^4=16) */
int digits[(sizeof (int) * CHAR_BIT) / 3 + 1], 
    *digitsp = digits;
do {
    *digitsp++ = number % 10;
    number /= 10;
} while(number > 0);

You will see how many digits you converted by taking the difference

digitsp - digits

If you want to put it into a function:

#define MIN_DIGITS_IN_INT ((sizeof (int) * CHAR_BIT) / 3 + 1)

int to_array(int number, int *digits) {
    int *digitsp = digits;
    do {
        *digitsp++ = number % 10;
        number /= 10;
    } while(number > 0);
    return digitsp - digits;
}

int main() {
    int number = rand();
    int digits[MIN_DIGITS_IN_INT];
    int n = to_array(number, digits);

    /* test whether we're right */
    while(n-- > 0) 
        printf("%d", digits[n]);
    }
    printf(" = %d\n", number);
}

I prefer automatic arrays to dynamic memory allocation in this case, since it's easier to do it right and not leak accidentally.

share|improve this answer
    
"A bit more than 3 bits?" I think you just won some kind of phrasing prize. –  unwind Feb 5 '09 at 12:34
    
yeah, i figure it sounds strange oO let me change it –  Johannes Schaub - litb Feb 5 '09 at 12:35
    
Awesome how different logic path produces the same results :) 32 / 3 + 1 is almost the same as log10(2 ** 32) + 1 == log2(2 ** 32) / log2(10) + 1 == 32 / log2(10) + 1 < 32 / 3 + 1 –  vava Feb 5 '09 at 13:06
    
can u explain MIN_DIGITS_IN_INT ((sizeof (int) * CHAR_BIT) / 3 + 1) ? –  yesraaj Feb 5 '09 at 15:42
    
rajKumar, it needs to be a compile time constant. so i didn't use log10. you need 3.32193 bits to store one decimal place (ld(10)) - ten binary decisions. that means, that you cannot store more than (sizeof (int) * CHAR_BIT)/3.32193 places in an int, which is 9.63296 –  Johannes Schaub - litb Feb 5 '09 at 19:09
show 1 more comment

using vadim's code, I came up with this test program:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <math.h>

char * convertNumberIntoArray(unsigned int number) {
    unsigned int length = (int)(log10((float)number)) + 1;
    char * arr = (char *) malloc(length * sizeof(char)), * curr = arr;
    do {
        *curr++ = number % 10;
        number /= 10;
    } while (number != 0);
    return arr;
}



int main(void)
{
    int InputNumber;
    int arr[5];

    printf("enter number: \n");
    scanf("%d", &InputNumber);

    convertNumberIntoArray(InputNumber);

    printf("The number components are: %d %d %d\n", arr[0],arr[1],arr[2]);

    system("PAUSE");    
    return 0;
}

but the output is garbage. Can anyone advise if I have done something stupid here?

/***** output *****/
enter number:
501
The number components are: 2009291924 2009145456 -1
Press any key to continue . . .

--dave

share|improve this answer
    
The function returns an array. You need this: char *arr; arr = convertNumberIntoArray(InputNumber); Note that arr should be a char *, not an int []. If you want it to be an int *, you should change the function to return int *, not char *. –  Chris Lutz Feb 5 '09 at 15:56
    
thanks Chris, it now works –  droseman Feb 5 '09 at 16:25
    
don't forget to free(arr) after you are done with it. Alternatively, you can use @litb approach and create static array with length (32/3 + 1) == 11 and just fill it in then. –  vava Feb 6 '09 at 0:31
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.