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I have an object which has a name and a score. I would like to sort a collection of such objects so that they are grouped by name and sorted by maximum score in each group (and within the group by descending score as well).

let me demonstrate what I intend to achieve. assume I have these objects(name, score):

(a, 3)
(a, 9)
(b, 7)
(b, 10)
(c, 8)
(c, 3)

then I would like them to be sorted like this:

(b, 10)
(b, 7)
(a, 9)
(a, 3)
(c, 8)
(c, 3)

is this feasible with a Comparator? I can't figure it out, so any hints would be appreciated.

share|improve this question
1  
As i understand it, you want sort of the equivalent of GROUP BY name ORDER BY MAX(score), score DESC, not ORDER BY name, score? –  Christoffer Hammarström Mar 1 '11 at 17:37
    
@user639755: Can you be more specific about what your intentions are? Like Christoffer writes. –  Marcus Mar 2 '11 at 8:10
    
@Marcus: He does provide example input with expected output, writing an assertEquals is trivial. –  Christoffer Hammarström Mar 3 '11 at 10:05

5 Answers 5

No, you can't do it with a single sort with a single comparator. You have to group them first.

Edit: Here is a really rough unit test that demonstrates one way to do it. I haven't cleaned it up as much as i would have liked.

Stuff like this is painful in Java, and i would normally use Google Guava for this.

import org.junit.Test;

import java.util.*;

import static java.util.Arrays.asList;
import static org.junit.Assert.assertEquals;

public class GroupSortTest {

    @Test
    public void testGroupSort() {
        List<Record> records = asList(
                new Record("a", 3),
                new Record("a", 9),
                new Record("b", 7),
                new Record("b", 10),
                new Record("c", 8),
                new Record("c", 3));

        List<SortedMap<Integer, Record>> recordsGroupedByName = groupRecordsByNameAndSortedByScoreDescending(records);
        Collections.sort(recordsGroupedByName, byHighestScoreInGroupDescending());
        List<Record> result = flattenGroups(recordsGroupedByName);

        List<Record> expected = asList(
                new Record("b", 10),
                new Record("b", 7),
                new Record("a", 9),
                new Record("a", 3),
                new Record("c", 8),
                new Record("c", 3));

        assertEquals(expected, result);
    }

    private List<Record> flattenGroups(List<SortedMap<Integer, Record>> recordGroups) {
        List<Record> result = new ArrayList<Record>();
        for (SortedMap<Integer, Record> group : recordGroups) {
            result.addAll(group.values());
        }
        return result;
    }

    private List<SortedMap<Integer, Record>> groupRecordsByNameAndSortedByScoreDescending(List<Record> records) {
        Map<String, SortedMap<Integer, Record>> groupsByName = new HashMap<String, SortedMap<Integer, Record>>();
        for (Record record : records) {
            SortedMap<Integer, Record> group = groupsByName.get(record.getName());
            if (null == group) {
                group = new TreeMap<Integer, Record>(descending());
                groupsByName.put(record.getName(), group);
            }
            group.put(record.getScore(), record);
        }
        return new ArrayList<SortedMap<Integer, Record>>(groupsByName.values());
    }

    private DescendingSortComparator descending() {
        return new DescendingSortComparator();
    }

    private ByFirstKeyDescending byHighestScoreInGroupDescending() {
        return new ByFirstKeyDescending();
    }

    static class Record {
        private final String name;
        private final Integer score;

        public Record(String name, Integer score) {
            this.name = name;
            this.score = score;
        }

        @Override
        public boolean equals(Object o) {
            return this == o || score.equals(((Record) o).score) && name.equals(((Record) o).name);
        }

        @Override
        public int hashCode() {
            int result = name.hashCode();
            result = 31 * result + score;
            return result;
        }

        @Override
        public String toString() {
            return "("+name+", "+score+")";
        }

        public String getName() {
            return name;
        }

        public Integer getScore() {
            return score;
        }
    }

    private static class ByFirstKeyDescending implements Comparator<SortedMap<Integer, Record>> {
        public int compare(SortedMap<Integer, Record> o1, SortedMap<Integer, Record> o2) {
            return o2.firstKey().compareTo(o1.firstKey());
        }
    }

    private static class DescendingSortComparator implements Comparator<Comparable> {
        public int compare(Comparable o1, Comparable o2) {
            return o2.compareTo(o1);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1 Looking at the answer here, I believe you are wrong. –  Amir Raminfar Mar 1 '11 at 17:22
    
@Amir: Except that none of the other answers actually read the question which asked about sorting names by the highest score for each name. The other answers only tell you how to sort individual records by score and name without grouping by name, which is not the same thing. –  Christoffer Hammarström Mar 1 '11 at 17:26
    
What are you talking about? It sorts by name first then by score. This works. I have tried it myself. –  Amir Raminfar Mar 1 '11 at 17:29
2  
@Amir: Which is not what the question was about. The question wants all the b:s sorted first because one of the b:s has the highest score overall, and then all the a:s after that because one of the a:s has the second score overall, and so on. If you know SQL, he wants GROUP BY name ORDER BY MAX(score), score DESC, not ORDER BY name, score (sort of). –  Christoffer Hammarström Mar 1 '11 at 17:35
    
+1 for reading the question. :-) –  David Victor Jun 18 '11 at 15:56

Foreach over the collection, and put the objects into a Map<String, SortedSet<YourObject>>, keyed by name, where the SortedSet is a TreeSet with a custom comparator that compares by score.

Then foreach over the map's values() collection, and put the groups into a SortedSet<SortedSet<YourObject>>, with a second custom comparator that compares SortedSets according to their largest element. Actually, instead of foreaching, you can simply use addAll().

Here's the code:

public class SortThings {

    static class Thing {
        public final String name;
        public final int score;
        public Thing(String name, int score) {
            this.name = name;
            this.score = score;
        }
        @Override
        public String toString() {
            return "(" + name + ", " + score + ")";
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Collection<Thing> things = Arrays.asList(
            new Thing("a", 3),
            new Thing("a", 9),
            new Thing("b", 7),
            new Thing("b", 10),
            new Thing("c", 8),
            new Thing("c", 3)
        );

        SortedSet<SortedSet<Thing>> sortedGroups = sortThings(things);

        System.out.println(sortedGroups);
    }

    private static SortedSet<SortedSet<Thing>> sortThings(Collection<Thing> things) {
        final Comparator<Thing> compareThings = new Comparator<Thing>() {
            public int compare(Thing a, Thing b) {
                Integer aScore = a.score;
                Integer bScore = b.score;
                return aScore.compareTo(bScore);
            }
        };

        // first pass
        Map<String, SortedSet<Thing>> groups = new HashMap<String, SortedSet<Thing>>();
        for (Thing obj: things) {
            SortedSet<Thing> group = groups.get(obj.name);
            if (group == null) {
                group = new TreeSet<Thing>(compareThings);
                groups.put(obj.name, group);
            }
            group.add(obj);
        }

        // second pass
        SortedSet<SortedSet<Thing>> sortedGroups = new TreeSet<SortedSet<Thing>>(new Comparator<SortedSet<Thing>>() {
            public int compare(SortedSet<Thing> a, SortedSet<Thing> b) {
                return compareThings.compare(a.last(), b.last());
            }
        });
        sortedGroups.addAll(groups.values());
        return sortedGroups;
    }

}

Note that the output is in smallest-to-largest order. That's the natural order with Java's collections; it would be trivial to modify this to sort the other way if that's what you need.

share|improve this answer
    
Either use SortedMap or you have to sort each set by both score and identity to handle duplicates. –  Christoffer Hammarström Mar 1 '11 at 18:37
    
@Christoffer Hammarström: as far as i can tell, my code handles duplicate Things (by deduplicating them). Could you expand on what you meant? –  Tom Anderson Mar 1 '11 at 18:47
    
Deduplicating them isn't really handling them though. If i put in two equal but not identical Thing, i want two equal but not identical Thing in the result.You just made me realize that i have the same bug myself though! D'oh! :) –  Christoffer Hammarström Mar 1 '11 at 19:00
1  
@Christoffer: We don't know for sure what the right thing to do with duplicates is. If the OP's goal is just to get the groups in order, deduplicating is fine. If not, then yes, this code is incorrect; the fix would be to change compareThings to break ties somehow (i think it would have to be arbitrary, eg by hashcode). And i still don't see how a SortedMap would help. –  Tom Anderson Mar 2 '11 at 10:46
    
You're right on both accounts, a SortedMap does not help. That was just a misthought on my part. Also, you're right that we don't know that the OP cares about duplicates. I just think it's usually more likely that you'd want a non-destructive algorithm, and since it's a slightly harder problem to solve, the solution would be more complete if it preserved duplicates. –  Christoffer Hammarström Mar 2 '11 at 11:24

I think you can do this. First check to see if the group is equal. If it is then compare on score. Otherwise return which group you want to be more on top. Let me code it up.

    class Item{
      String name;
      int score;
    }

   new Comparator<Item>(){

       @Override
       public int compare(Item o1, Item o2) {
            if (o1.name.equals(o2.name)) {
                return o1.score > o2.score ? 1 : -1; // might have to flip this. I didn't test
            }else {
                return o1.name.compareTo(o2.name);
            }
       }
    };
share|improve this answer
    
I downvoted, because this sorts by name and then score, which is not the same as grouping by name and sorting them by highest score within the group. –  Christoffer Hammarström Mar 1 '11 at 17:49
    
I must agree with you. I was unclear at first. But if he want the highest group score to be on top then indeed this is not possible. Sorry for the confusion. –  Amir Raminfar Mar 1 '11 at 19:10
public class ScoreComparator implements Comparator<Item>
{

  public int compare(Item a, Item b){

    if (a.name.equals(b.name){
      return a.score.compareTo(b.score);
    }

    return a.name.compareTo(b.Name);    

  }

}
share|improve this answer
1  
That's not even java! –  Amir Raminfar Mar 1 '11 at 17:23
    
@Amir: Thanks for the down vote. Good to know that people here on stackoverflow knows how to use them. –  Marcus Mar 1 '11 at 17:26
    
You are welcome, sarcasm. +1 for fixing. –  Amir Raminfar Mar 1 '11 at 17:27
    
And another down vote? What is happening to SO? –  Marcus Mar 1 '11 at 17:36
    
I downvoted, because this sorts by name and then score, which is not the same as grouping by name and sorting them by highest score within the group. –  Christoffer Hammarström Mar 1 '11 at 17:48

Yes Go for Comparator

Give first preference to name in comparison and then to score. it will be grouped up with sorted score also

    List<Score> scores = new ArrayList<Score>();
    scores.add(new Score("a", 58));
    scores.add(new Score("a", 10));
    scores.add(new Score("b", 165));
    scores.add(new Score("a", 1));
    scores.add(new Score("b", 1658));
    scores.add(new Score("c", 1));
    scores.add(new Score("c", 10));
    scores.add(new Score("c", 0));

    Collections.sort(scores, new Comparator<Score>() {

        public int compare(Score o1, Score o2) {
            if (o1.getName().compareTo(o2.getName()) == 0) {
                return o2.getScore() - o1.getScore();
            } else {
                return o1.getName().compareTo(o2.getName());
            }
        }
    });
    System.out.println(scores);

Update

As Chris pointed out.

import java.util.*;

/**
 *
 * @author Jigar
 */
class Score {

    private String name;
    private List<Integer> scores;

    public Score() {
    }

    public Score(String name, List<Integer> scores) {
        this.name = name;
        this.scores = scores;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public List<Integer> getScores() {
        return scores;
    }

    public void setScores(List<Integer> scores) {
        this.scores = scores;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return name + " , " + scores + "\n";
    }
}

public class ScoreDemo { 

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        List<Score> scores = new ArrayList<Score>();


        List<Integer> lstA = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        lstA.add(3);
        lstA.add(9);
        lstA.add(7);
        Collections.sort(lstA);
        Collections.reverse(lstA);

        List<Integer> lstB = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        lstB.add(10);
        lstB.add(8);
        lstB.add(3);
        Collections.sort(lstB);
        Collections.reverse(lstB);

        List<Integer> lstC = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        lstC.add(8);
        lstC.add(3);
        Collections.sort(lstC);
        Collections.reverse(lstC);


        scores.add(new Score("a", lstA));
        scores.add(new Score("b", lstB));
        scores.add(new Score("c", lstC));





        Collections.sort(scores, new Comparator<Score>() {

            public int compare(Score o1, Score o2) {
                return o2.getScores().get(0).compareTo(o1.getScores().get(0));
            }
        });
        System.out.println(scores);

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
why downvote..? –  Jigar Joshi Mar 1 '11 at 17:24
    
Someone is just going around and downvoting. It happened to my other post also. It is annoying. +1 for good answer though. I would have instead use the eqauls() function. –  Amir Raminfar Mar 1 '11 at 17:28
1  
Whoever downvoted this: why, and why didn't you also downvote Adam Batkin's answer, which is substantially the same? –  Tom Anderson Mar 1 '11 at 17:28
1  
flagged this activity. –  Jigar Joshi Mar 1 '11 at 17:30
2  
I downvoted, because this sorts by name and then score, which is not the same as grouping by name and sorting them by highest score within the group. –  Christoffer Hammarström Mar 1 '11 at 17:48

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