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I have an MSSQL 2005 database with GBs of orphaned useless data. This bad data causes the database to be hard to work with, taking 4 hours to back up and 7 hours to restore. All the bad data is in one table.

I have decided to import the data into another table and delete the records I believe are bad. So I am running a simple sql query like this:

Insert databaseB.dbo.table (col1,col2) 
select col1,col2  from databaseA.dbo.table

My last attempt to run the above query ran for 12 hours without completing before I had to cancel and restart the sql services because any application that used any database on that server would not respond.

After this operation completes I will be running simple delete “delete databaseA.dbo.table where condition=1” which the last time I tried it locked the server as well.

I do not need any locks on the table I am trying to update.

Any suggestions on how I can limit this query to not affect this or other production systems? Are there any flags or options I can set to make this run quicker or smoother? (like changing the recovery model) It can run for days if necessary I just need to somehow throttle the resources used. Thanks in advance for any advice and let me know if I have provided enough information.

It has occured to me to backup and restore the database to another location. Truncate the table and then import the good data back to the table in question. But since it would take a minimum of 11 hours to complete step 1, and step 2 is an unknown length, I do not like this option.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The easiest way to do this without affecting other operations, is to transfer the information using a cursor and insert one row at a time or loop through the rows manually.

For a cursor see here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms180169.aspx

Looping:

  1. Select 10 rows
  2. Import them into the new table
  3. Delete those 10 rows

    WHILE (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM YOUR_BAD_RECORDS) > 0
    BEGIN
        INSERT INTO TABLE...SELECT TOP 10 * FROM BAD_RECORDS
    END
    

Do this until the job completes. It will take longer, but it won't lock the server resources and allow other systems to access the db.

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Thats looks like it might work. Should I put the insert and delete into a transaction so that both statements are rolled back if there is a problem? I also assume if the query is stopped I can just fire it up and keep going that way. I also need to ensure the same 10 records are imported and deleted. I don't know if "top" would be consistent unless I add an order by clause, which would realy probably slow it down, although I have an idea using the keys available, let me try it and I will mark this as the answer, Thanks –  Matthew Bierman Mar 1 '11 at 20:38
    
You should be able to embed it in a transaction just in case. You should be able to resume where you left off as well since you are incrementally deleting the records. –  Kevin Mar 1 '11 at 22:00
    
I like the incremental approach as it is more likely to be able to process "in the background" and not impact the application users. –  Ross Bradbury Mar 1 '11 at 22:11
    
I ended creating a view of the bad record ids (I have to use two keys to get what I need) and then doing a while "count of records in view" > 0. I tried to use the OUTPUT clause but it did not seem to play well with the join I needed to identify my records, so I am putting the insert and delete statements in a transaction. It is running now and not impacting my users at all, so I think it will work. Wish me luck, I have been not fixing this problem for almost 6 months now. –  Matthew Bierman Mar 2 '11 at 0:39
    
Good luck. If you run into problems don't hesitate to ask –  Kevin Mar 2 '11 at 0:58

Because you mention this is blocking other database activity, it sounds to me that the problem you are encountering is that your insert into the archive table is locking the records that are being selected and blocking other users. Your statement may also be getting blocked by other activity if it is running during production hours.

I suggest an incremental process to move these records. Your tags indicate you are using SQL Server 2005, which supports the OUTPUT clause, so you can delete the old records and insert them into the archive table in one shot. Choose a number of records that seems reasonable to do at a time, and if you use the READPAST locking hint, you won't get blocked on records locked by other users. Just run your batch as many times as necessary, perhaps as a scheduled task. Of course make sure your WHERE clause only selects records you want to archive.

DELETE TOP (10000) FROM dbo.Valid_Date WITH (READPAST)
OUTPUT 
    DELETED.valid_date, DELETED.valid_date_KEY
    INTO dbo.Archive_Of_Valid_Date(valid_date, valid_date_KEY)
WHERE 
    valid_date < '19800101'

Edited to expand on Matthew's comment to my answer


Using a COUNT(*) to determine if there is any work to do is not free, so most of the time you can either use EXISTS (which short-circuits as soon as any record that matches is found) or use the @@rowcount after the statements

WHILE (SELECT COUNT() FROM DatabaseA.dbo.table WHERE Condition=1) > 0 
BEGIN 
    DELETE TOP (100) FROM DatabaseA.dbo.table WITH (READPAST)
    OUTPUT 
        DELETED.x, DELETED.y
        INTO ArchiveDB.dbo.table(x, y)
    WHERE 
        condition = 1
END

Try:

WHILE (1 = 1)
BEGIN 
    DELETE TOP (100) FROM DatabaseA.dbo.table WITH (READPAST)
    OUTPUT 
        DELETED.x, DELETED.y
        INTO ArchiveDB.dbo.table(x, y)
    WHERE 
        condition = 1

    IF(@@rowcount <= 0)
        break;
END

or

WHILE (EXISTS(SELECT * FROM DatabaseA.dbo.table WHERE Condition=1)) 
BEGIN 
    DELETE TOP (100) FROM DatabaseA.dbo.table WITH (READPAST)
    OUTPUT 
        DELETED.x, DELETED.y
        INTO ArchiveDB.dbo.table(x, y)
    WHERE 
        condition = 1
END
share|improve this answer
    
I do need to handle locking, so thanks for the readpast hint, but completly unrelated databases where not responding eithier. –  Matthew Bierman Mar 1 '11 at 23:24
    
So if i put yours and Kevins solutions together I get: WHILE (SELECT COUNT() FROM DatabaseA.dbo.table WHERE Condition=1) > 0 BEGIN DELETE TOP (100) FROM DatabaseA.dbo.table WITH (READPAST) OUTPUT DELETED. INTO DatabaseB.dbo.table WHERE Condition=1 END –  Matthew Bierman Mar 1 '11 at 23:25
    
I an also new to the OUTPUT command so thanks for pointing that out to me –  Matthew Bierman Mar 1 '11 at 23:28
    
I want to give both you and Kevin credit, but I can only mark one answer. Thanks for the quick help. –  Matthew Bierman Mar 2 '11 at 0:41

Remove all indexes and foreign keys from the destination table. Recreate after the table is cleaned.

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Thanks for answering but I created the destination table with no indexes or foriegn keys so I do not believe that is the issue, I would not be comfortable removing them from the source table as it is part of a third pary app which I am trying to keep running during this process. Also some of the indexes would be part of my query that determines which records to insert and delete, so it might hurt performance in that respect. –  Matthew Bierman Mar 1 '11 at 20:27

In instead of deleting after, just don't insert what will be deleted.

Insert databaseB.dbo.table (col1,col2) 
select col1,col2  from databaseA.dbo.table
where condition <> 1
share|improve this answer
    
The records already exist in database a, I am trying to copy them to database b before I delete them so I have a backup of them in case I screw something up, even the raw delete statement takes days to run and locks up my server. –  Matthew Bierman Mar 1 '11 at 21:52
    
@Matthew database b will be the production one and database a will be the backup. Just rename them after you are sure everything is OK. –  Clodoaldo Neto Mar 1 '11 at 22:15
    
I see, that makes more sense, but I am dealing with issues in one table. I would have to move all the other tables (which is information I did not give you) and then have to make them current, (figuring out what changes were made while I was moving data). The third party app is extremely picky and I doubt it would ever accept the new database, as there is also tons of metadata I would have to find and update. Remember the backup and restore process takes a minimum of 11 hours –  Matthew Bierman Mar 1 '11 at 23:15
    
I don’t want to mention the name of the app but I can think you could figure out a lot of additional information if you look at my question here stackoverflow.com/questions/4196601/… –  Matthew Bierman Mar 1 '11 at 23:15

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