Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I understand full the ref word in the .NET

Since using the same variable, would increase speed to use ref instead of making copy?

I find bottleneck to be in password general.

Here is my codes

protected internal string GetSecurePasswordString(string legalChars, int length)
{
    Random myRandom = new Random();
    string myString = "";
    for (int i = 0; i < length; i++)
    {
        int charPos = myRandom.Next(0, legalChars.Length - 1);
        myString = myString + legalChars[charPos].ToString();
    }
    return myString;
}

is better to ref before legalchars?

share|improve this question
1  
Your bottleneck is having to run this function several million times in succession before it generates a new password. And not using StringBuilder. –  Hans Passant Mar 1 '11 at 20:33
    
Is this function actually a bottleneck? You must have millions of users signing up every day, I envy you. But if so, you might want to consider creating your passwords out of process and make them available from a queue of some kind, so the function just has to get the next length characters from an already-created list. You can make passwords all night long or an another machine entirely so you have plenty when they're needed. –  Jamie Treworgy Mar 1 '11 at 20:39
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

No, you shouldn't pass the string reference by reference.

However, you are creating several strings pointlessly. If you're creating long passwords, that could be why it's a bottleneck. Here's a faster implementation:

protected internal string GetSecurePasswordString(string legalChars, int length)
{
    Random myRandom = new Random();
    char[] chars = new char[length];
    for (int i = 0; i < length; i++)
    {
        int charPos = myRandom.Next(0, legalChars.Length - 1);
        chars[i] = legalChars[charPos];
    }
    return new string(chars);
}

However, it still has three big flaws:

  • It creates a new instance of Random each time. If you call this method twice in quick succession, you'll get the same password twice. Bad idea.
  • The upper bound specified in a Random.Next() call is exclusive - so you'll never use the last character of legalChars.
  • It uses System.Random, which is not meant to be in any way cryptographically secure. Given that this is meant to be for a "secure password" you should consider using something like System.Security.Cryptography.RandomNumberGenerator. It's more work to do so because the API is harder, but you'll end up with a more secure system (if you do it properly).

You might also want to consider using SecureString, if you get really paranoid.

share|improve this answer
1  
Better yet, don't guess. Profile the code to see where the time is being spent. Don't trust anyone's prognostications unless they've profiled the code as well. (Even though using the alloc-char-array is most likely faster than using string concatenation, if most of your time is spent in Random.Next(), it won't matter much how fast you make the rest of the code - Amdahl's Law) –  typo.pl Mar 1 '11 at 20:32
1  
@typo.pl: Yes, that's a good point. Admittedly profilers can affect the performance as well - it ends up becoming a quantum problem :) By the time the OP is using a "real" random number generator (one which is appropriate for passwords) that probably will be the major performance killer. I'd still avoid the string concatenation though :) –  Jon Skeet Mar 1 '11 at 20:35
    
@typo.pl i am have never taking prognostications or solicitations !! is of poor character and much denigration ! why insult ?? –  PRASHANT P Mar 1 '11 at 20:57
    
how take in so many reps ? i am jealous :) –  PRASHANT P Mar 1 '11 at 20:59
add comment

Passing a string by value does not copy the string. It only copies the reference to the string. There's no performance benefit to passing the string by reference instead of by value.

share|improve this answer
    
in the .net string reference is string.. always has much of indirection,, i thought –  PRASHANT P Mar 1 '11 at 21:00
add comment

strings in .Net are immutable , so all modify operations on strings always result in creation ( and garbage collection) of new strings. No performance gain would be achieved by using ref in this case. Instead , use StringBuilder.

share|improve this answer
    
Why use StringBuilder when you know the final length? –  Jon Skeet Mar 1 '11 at 20:33
    
And what about the intermediate strings that get created and garbaged for so many iterations ? Using StringBuilder properly can avoid all the memory wasted otherwise. –  Bhaskar Mar 1 '11 at 20:41
    
I wasn't suggesting that the current way of creating the string is a good idea. I was suggesting that using StringBuilder isn't the best solution, given the situation. We know exactly how long the string needs to be - we can create a char array of the right size, write to it directly and then create a string from that. –  Jon Skeet Mar 1 '11 at 20:49
    
@Jon : You are right.Using char array would be better than StringBuilder. I was just trying to better the original code. –  Bhaskar Mar 1 '11 at 20:54
add comment

A word about the general performance gain of passing a string ByReference ("ref") instead of ByValue:

There is a performance gain, but it is very small!

Consider the program below where a function is called 10.000.0000 times with a string argument by value and by reference. The average time measured was

ByValue: 249 milliseconds

ByReference: 226 milliseconds

In general "ref" is a little faster, but often it's not worth worrying about it.

Here is my code:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace StringPerformanceTest
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            const int n = 10000000;
            int k;
            string time, s1;
            Stopwatch sw;

            // List for testing ("1", "2", "3" ...)
            List<string> list = new List<string>(n);
            for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
                list.Add(i.ToString());

            // Test ByVal
            k = 0;
            sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();

            foreach (string s in list)
            {
                s1 = s;
                if (StringTestSubVal(s1)) k++;
            }

            time = GetElapsedString(sw);
            Console.WriteLine("ByVal: " + time);
            Console.WriteLine("123 found " + k + " times.");


            // Test ByRef
            k = 0;
            sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();

            foreach (string s in list)
            {
                s1 = s;
                if (StringTestSubRef(ref s1)) k++;
            }

            time = GetElapsedString(sw);
            Console.WriteLine("Time ByRef: " + time);
            Console.WriteLine("123 found " + k + " times.");
        }

        static bool StringTestSubVal(string s)
        {
            if (s == "123")
                return true;
            else
                return false;
        }

        static bool StringTestSubRef(ref string s)
        {
            if (s == "123")
                return true;
            else
                return false;
        }

        static string GetElapsedString(Stopwatch sw)
        {
            if (sw.IsRunning) sw.Stop();
            TimeSpan ts = sw.Elapsed;
            return String.Format("{0:00}:{1:00}:{2:00}.{3:000}", ts.Hours, ts.Minutes, ts.Seconds, ts.Milliseconds);
        }

    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.