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Following are two examples that do the same thing in different ways. I'm comparing them.

Version 1

For the sake of an example, define any method to create and return an ExpandoObject from an XElement based on business logic:

var ToExpando = new Func<XElement, ExpandoObject>(xClient =>
{
    dynamic o = new ExpandoObject();    
    o.OnlineDetails = new ExpandoObject();
    o.OnlineDetails.Password = xClient.Element(XKey.onlineDetails).Element(XKey.password).Value;
    o.OnlineDetails.Roles = xClient.Element(XKey.onlineDetails).Element(XKey.roles).Elements(XKey.roleId).Select(xroleid => xroleid.Value);
    // More fields TBD.
}

Call the above delegate from a LINQ to XML query:

var qClients =
    from client in xdoc.Root.Element(XKey.clients).Elements(XKey.client)
    select ToExpando(client);

Version 2

Do it all in the LINQ query, including creation and call to Func delegate.

var qClients =
from client in xdoc.Root.Element(XKey.clients).Elements(XKey.client)
select (new Func<ExpandoObject>(() =>
        {
            dynamic o = new ExpandoObject();
            o.OnlineDetails = new ExpandoObject();
            o.OnlineDetails.Password = client.Element(XKey.onlineDetails).Element(XKey.password).Value;
            o.OnlineDetails.Roles = client.Element(XKey.onlineDetails).Element(XKey.roles).Elements(XKey.roleId).Select(xroleid => xroleid.Value);
            // More fields TBD.
  return o;
  }))();

Considering delegate creation is in the select part, is Version 2 inefficient? Is it managed or optimized by either the C# compiler or runtime so it won't matter?

I like Version 2 for its tightness (keeping the object creation logic in the query), but am aware it might not be viable depending on what the compiler or runtime does.

share|improve this question
    
Why dynamic? Seems like the type of o is known just fine at compile time... – Billy ONeal Mar 1 '11 at 22:56
    
@Billy ONeal: You can't expand ExpandoObject without using dynamic as far as I know. – John K Mar 1 '11 at 23:10
    
Whoops -- I thought ExpandoObject was a type defined by you. – Billy ONeal Mar 1 '11 at 23:41
up vote 4 down vote accepted

The latter approach looks pretty horrible to me. I believe it will have to genuinely create a new delegate each time as you're capturing a different client each time, but personally I wouldn't do it that way at all. Given that you've got real statements in there, why not write a normal method?

private static ToExpando(XElement client)
{
    // Possibly use an object initializer instead?
    dynamic o = new ExpandoObject();    
    o.OnlineDetails = new ExpandoObject();
    o.OnlineDetails.Password = client.Element(XKey.onlineDetails)
                                     .Element(XKey.password).Value;
    o.OnlineDetails.Roles = client.Element(XKey.onlineDetails)
                                  .Element(XKey.roles)
                                  .Elements(XKey.roleId)
                                  .Select(xroleid => xroleid.Value);
    return o;
}

and then query it with:

var qClients = xdoc.Root.Element(XKey.clients)
                        .Elements(XKey.client)
                        .Select(ToExpando);

I would be much more concerned about the readability of the code than the performance of creating delegates, which is generally pretty quick. I don't think there's any need to use nearly as many lambdas as you currently seem keen to do. Think about when you come back to this code in a year's time. Are you really going to find the nested lambda easier to understand than a method?

(By the way, separating the conversion logic into a method makes that easy to test in isolation...)

EDIT: Even if you do want to do it all in the LINQ expression, why are you so keen to create another level of indirection? Just because query expressions don't allow statement lambdas? Given that you're doing nothing but a simple select, that's easy enough to cope with:

var qClients = xdoc.Root
           .Element(XKey.clients)
           .Elements(XKey.client)
           .Select(client => {
               dynamic o = new ExpandoObject();
               o.OnlineDetails = new ExpandoObject();
               o.OnlineDetails.Password = client.Element(XKey.onlineDetails)
                                                .Element(XKey.password).Value;
               o.OnlineDetails.Roles = client.Element(XKey.onlineDetails)
                                             .Element(XKey.roles)
                                             .Elements(XKey.roleId)
                                             .Select(xroleid => xroleid.Value);
               return o; 
           });
share|improve this answer
    
Could you please explain why is delegate created several times, I can't get it? – Andrey Mar 1 '11 at 22:45
    
@Andrey: It is translated to Select(new Func<..>(client => (new Func<..>(...)())) – Tomas Petricek Mar 1 '11 at 22:46
    
@Andrey: In the original code, a single delegate is created to pass into Select... but that delegate creates another delegate, and executes it to return the object. Seems pointless to me. – Jon Skeet Mar 1 '11 at 22:46
    
@Tomas Petricek thx! I see now! With old (non sql-like) syntax delegate creation can easily be avoided, but sql-like syntax doesn't allow multiline lambdas. – Andrey Mar 1 '11 at 22:48
    
@Jon Skeet for me it seems like abuse of sql-like syntax. If you replace reference to ToExpando with the actual code delegate would be created only one time. – Andrey Mar 1 '11 at 22:49

It is true that your second version creates new Func instance repeatedly - however, this just means allocating some small object (closure) and using pointer to a function. I don't think this is a large overhead compared to dynamic lookups that you need to perform in the body of the delegate (to work with dynamic objects).

Alternatively, you could declare a local lambda function like this:

Func<XElement, ExpandoObject> convert = client => {
    dynamic o = new ExpandoObject();
    o.OnlineDetails = new ExpandoObject();
    o.OnlineDetails.Password = 
       client.Element(XKey.onlineDetails).Element(XKey.password).Value;
    o.OnlineDetails.Roles = client.Element(XKey.onlineDetails).
       Element(XKey.roles).Elements(XKey.roleId).
       Select(xroleid => xroleid.Value);
    // More fields TBD.
    return o;
}

var qClients =
    from client in xdoc.Root.Element(XKey.clients).Elements(XKey.client)
    select convert(client);

This way, you can create just a single delegate, but keep the code that does the conversion close to the code that implements the query.

Another option would be to use anonymous types instead - what are the reasons for using ExpandoObject in your scenario? The only limitation of anonymous types would be that you may not be able to access them from other assemblies (they are internal), but working with them using dynamic should be fine...

Your select could look like:

select new { OnlineDetails = new { Password = ..., Roles = ... }}

Finally, you could also use Reflection to convert anonymous type to ExpandoObject, but that would probably be even more inefficient (i.e. very difficult to write efficiently)

share|improve this answer
    
P: Good question about why I'm not using anonymous types. It's because I'm crossing assembly boundaries with the calling code. My question omits that part, and also doesn't show that the given code is wrapped in a method of type IEnumerable<dynamic>. stackoverflow.com/questions/2993200 – John K Mar 1 '11 at 23:02

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